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    Hi,
    Does anyone know how to structure each question for the part A (1-4)
    I am doing Higher tier and aim to get an A/A*
    Any help would be appreciated!!!
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    (Original post by k1234j)
    Hi,
    Does anyone know how to structure each question for the part A (1-4)
    I am doing Higher tier and aim to get an A/A*
    Any help would be appreciated!!!
    Hey I'm going to move this to the English section for you! Best of luck with the exam

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    I’ve gotten A’s and A*s in previous mocks so here’s my advice!

    For each of the first three questions, do not include intros or conclusions. They will give you no extra marks and will waste time. Go straight into the content of your answer.

    Personally I find that reading time isn’t necessary, i am a fast reader and can factor reading time into my answer time. I spend 15 mins on 1, 2 and 3 each, 25 on question 4 and 5. And 40 on 6.

    Question 1:

    make sure to choose quotations from the whole article. Make sure the examiner know that you have fully understood the whole article. Look for a change in the article, or two different sides of an argument. There should be no more than 3/4 in depth points about the article. Do NOT analyse specific language techniques in the article. Refer to quotes from experts and interviewees used in the article. Do not refer to effect on the reader.

    Start off something like this:

    1st paragraph:

    Source 1 is an article explaining... (main points in the article including any quotes from experts/interviewees that were included in the article)

    2nd paragraph:

    Write about the opposing side to the story in the article, if there is one. If not, write about any contrast or change present in the article.

    3rd paragraph:

    The article also explains that... Write in some detail about any points not included in the 1st paragraph

    4th paragraph:

    If there is time, write a short paragraph citing what experts/interviewees thought about the information/story contained in the article. I doubt there wont be any included in the article.

    Question 2:

    this question is the only one out of the first three that needs language analysis. Take specific words or small phrases from the headline, sub headline, or caption and WALAAL them (Write A Lot About A Little). Make sure with each point you make about the headline, sub headline, or caption, you link this to the article. Do same with the picture, analysing how the picture relates to the article. You can refer to effect on the reader.

    Do something like this:

    The writer uses the word/phrase “ “ in the headline/sub headline/caption to suggest/convey/imply/create connotations of/etc. …….this links to “ “ in the article.

    Do this until you run out of things to write about.

    The pictured used in source 2 suggests/implies/conveys/creates connotations of/etc. …. This relates to “ “ in the article. It also makes the reader…..

    Question 3:

    question 3 is similar to question 1 in some ways. Although instead of facts and understanding the article, it is about emotions and feelings instead. You have to look for a change in feelings/emotions during the article. Don’t analyse language. You can write about what makes the writer/subject experience certain feelings. For example, steve felt happy because the sun was out. It may not say it in the article, but you can infer that he was happy because of the sun (not sure if that makes much sense??). Also write about more than one character if there is one (there usually is one). Don’t comment on effect on the reader.

    Do something like this:

    Source 3 is about (make this very short. No more than a sentence). The writer/character/subject of source 3 feels “ “ this is because …..

    Do this a few times for each character but do not write about the change yet (it will be a large change, from awe and happiness and excitement to sadness and despair and frightening or something)

    The writers/characters/subjects feelings change from “ “ and “ “ to “ “ and “ “. This is because…


    Question 4:

    the most difficult question, I would say, it is the most difficult to get top marks on. The mistakes most people make are, analysing the wrong types of language, rather than the really powerful stuff (as this is more difficult to do), only using comparisons or only using contrasts, rather than balancing it out and using both.

    Here’s my advice: make 4-5 comparisons AND contrasts. Similarities and differences. Use quotes from each article. WALAAL (Write A Lot About A Little). Define the purpose of language. Define the effect of language on the reader. If you can, define any key terms of language techniques used, but this isn’t too important.

    Heres the stuff you need to focus on analysing (lets call it stuff A)

    - Powerful/evocative words with rich connotations
    - Evocative/powerful imagery
    - Figurative language - similes and metaphors
    - Visual/sensual imagery
    - Sound/aural imagery

    Heres the stuff that you shouldn’t focus on so much, its less important (lets call it stuff B)

    - Presentation of speech/quotes
    - Presentation of numbers/statistics
    - Use of contrasts
    - Use of colloquialism/informality for effect (no more than 1 point on this

    Heres how I would structure the first paragraph:

    The writer of text … uses language powerfully (etc.) To convey... The use of the (word/simile/phrase/metaphor) creates connotations of/implies/suggests/creates a sense of/makes the reader think/feel... This is developed with the use of the word (etc.) Which suggests (etc.) And implies (etc.)... The word also suggests (etc.)

    Do a 1 or 2 of these on stuff A

    Then you need a comparison/contrasting paragraph (sticking with stuff A)

    The writer of text (opposite to first few paragraphs) … also uses language powerfully (etc.) But to convey (etc.) .... For example the use of the word (etc.) Implies (etc.) .... This is developed with ... Which also suggests (etc.) ....

    And (sticking with stuff A if possible)

    The writer of text (of last paragraph) also uses language powerfully (etc.) To convey (etc.) .. For example the use of the word (etc.) Implies (etc.) .... This is developed with ... Which also suggests (etc.) ....


    And then if there is time, do a couple of paragraphs like the ones above but with stuff B.

    Hope I helped! (and sorry this was so long but it helped me to revise!)
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    (Original post by epage)
    I’ve gotten A’s and A*s in previous mocks so here’s my advice!

    For each of the first three questions, do not include intros or conclusions. They will give you no extra marks and will waste time. Go straight into the content of your answer.

    Personally I find that reading time isn’t necessary, i am a fast reader and can factor reading time into my answer time. I spend 15 mins on 1, 2 and 3 each, 25 on question 4 and 5. And 40 on 6.

    Question 1:

    make sure to choose quotations from the whole article. Make sure the examiner know that you have fully understood the whole article. Look for a change in the article, or two different sides of an argument. There should be no more than 3/4 in depth points about the article. Do NOT analyse specific language techniques in the article. Refer to quotes from experts and interviewees used in the article. Do not refer to effect on the reader.

    Start off something like this:

    1st paragraph:

    Source 1 is an article explaining... (main points in the article including any quotes from experts/interviewees that were included in the article)

    2nd paragraph:

    Write about the opposing side to the story in the article, if there is one. If not, write about any contrast or change present in the article.

    3rd paragraph:

    The article also explains that... Write in some detail about any points not included in the 1st paragraph

    4th paragraph:

    If there is time, write a short paragraph citing what experts/interviewees thought about the information/story contained in the article. I doubt there wont be any included in the article.

    Question 2:

    this question is the only one out of the first three that needs language analysis. Take specific words or small phrases from the headline, sub headline, or caption and WALAAL them (Write A Lot About A Little). Make sure with each point you make about the headline, sub headline, or caption, you link this to the article. Do same with the picture, analysing how the picture relates to the article. You can refer to effect on the reader.

    Do something like this:

    The writer uses the word/phrase “ “ in the headline/sub headline/caption to suggest/convey/imply/create connotations of/etc. …….this links to “ “ in the article.

    Do this until you run out of things to write about.

    The pictured used in source 2 suggests/implies/conveys/creates connotations of/etc. …. This relates to “ “ in the article. It also makes the reader…..

    Question 3:

    question 3 is similar to question 1 in some ways. Although instead of facts and understanding the article, it is about emotions and feelings instead. You have to look for a change in feelings/emotions during the article. Don’t analyse language. You can write about what makes the writer/subject experience certain feelings. For example, steve felt happy because the sun was out. It may not say it in the article, but you can infer that he was happy because of the sun (not sure if that makes much sense??). Also write about more than one character if there is one (there usually is one). Don’t comment on effect on the reader.

    Do something like this:

    Source 3 is about (make this very short. No more than a sentence). The writer/character/subject of source 3 feels “ “ this is because …..

    Do this a few times for each character but do not write about the change yet (it will be a large change, from awe and happiness and excitement to sadness and despair and frightening or something)

    The writers/characters/subjects feelings change from “ “ and “ “ to “ “ and “ “. This is because…


    Question 4:

    the most difficult question, I would say, it is the most difficult to get top marks on. The mistakes most people make are, analysing the wrong types of language, rather than the really powerful stuff (as this is more difficult to do), only using comparisons or only using contrasts, rather than balancing it out and using both.

    Here’s my advice: make 4-5 comparisons AND contrasts. Similarities and differences. Use quotes from each article. WALAAL (Write A Lot About A Little). Define the purpose of language. Define the effect of language on the reader. If you can, define any key terms of language techniques used, but this isn’t too important.

    Heres the stuff you need to focus on analysing (lets call it stuff A)

    - Powerful/evocative words with rich connotations
    - Evocative/powerful imagery
    - Figurative language - similes and metaphors
    - Visual/sensual imagery
    - Sound/aural imagery

    Heres the stuff that you shouldn’t focus on so much, its less important (lets call it stuff B)

    - Presentation of speech/quotes
    - Presentation of numbers/statistics
    - Use of contrasts
    - Use of colloquialism/informality for effect (no more than 1 point on this

    Heres how I would structure the first paragraph:

    The writer of text … uses language powerfully (etc.) To convey... The use of the (word/simile/phrase/metaphor) creates connotations of/implies/suggests/creates a sense of/makes the reader think/feel... This is developed with the use of the word (etc.) Which suggests (etc.) And implies (etc.)... The word also suggests (etc.)

    Do a 1 or 2 of these on stuff A

    Then you need a comparison/contrasting paragraph (sticking with stuff A)

    The writer of text (opposite to first few paragraphs) … also uses language powerfully (etc.) But to convey (etc.) .... For example the use of the word (etc.) Implies (etc.) .... This is developed with ... Which also suggests (etc.) ....

    And (sticking with stuff A if possible)

    The writer of text (of last paragraph) also uses language powerfully (etc.) To convey (etc.) .. For example the use of the word (etc.) Implies (etc.) .... This is developed with ... Which also suggests (etc.) ....


    And then if there is time, do a couple of paragraphs like the ones above but with stuff B.

    Hope I helped! (and sorry this was so long but it helped me to revise!)
    OMG Thank you sooo much!!!!!
 
 
 
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