GCSE History of Germany AQA Q&A Watch

nerdyminion
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I find it helpful to ask questions and answer them as a form of revision, so I was wondering if anyone would like to do it with me?

1. What was the Stauffenberg Bomb Plot, and what was its significance?

I hope this helps people!
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Changing Skies
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I find it helpful to ask questions and answer them as a form of revision, so I was wondering if anyone would like to do it with me?

1. What was the Stauffenberg Bomb Plot, and what was its significance?

I hope this helps people!
Hey I'll move this to the history forum for you, hope exams are going well

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Ranjeep
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I find it helpful to ask questions and answer them as a form of revision, so I was wondering if anyone would like to do it with me?

1. What was the Stauffenberg Bomb Plot, and what was its significance?

I hope this helps people!
The bombing was done after Hitler had gained power. It was done by Stauffenberg who placed a bomb at Hitler's side of the table, and this was to get rid of Hitler for once and for all. Stauffenberg was part of an operation called Operation Valkyrie, and the main objective was to kill Hitler and them take over Berlin with the army.

This was significant as it showed that there was opposition to the Nazi's, that people did object to their ideas. However, the aftermath of this was that Hitler executed around 5,000 people. This was an excuse for him to execute people who he knew/he thought opposed him, and so this was a way for him to make sure that no one would try and oppose him or even take away his power. It was a good and effective was to make sure that no one opposed him, and it was a good signal. As it was an example ton the people of what would happen to them if they opposed him - allowing Hitler to rule through terror
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by Ranjeep)
The bombing was done after Hitler had gained power. It was done by Stauffenberg who placed a bomb at Hitler's side of the table, and this was to get rid of Hitler for once and for all. Stauffenberg was part of an operation called Operation Valkyrie, and the main objective was to kill Hitler and them take over Berlin with the army.

This was significant as it showed that there was opposition to the Nazi's, that people did object to their ideas. However, the aftermath of this was that Hitler executed around 5,000 people. This was an excuse for him to execute people who he knew/he thought opposed him, and so this was a way for him to make sure that no one would try and oppose him or even take away his power. It was a good and effective was to make sure that no one opposed him, and it was a good signal. As it was an example ton the people of what would happen to them if they opposed him - allowing Hitler to rule through terror
It was also significant due to the fact that the plot's failure made the German Army become controlled by the SS.
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Ranjeep
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
It was also significant due to the fact that the plot's failure made the German Army become controlled by the SS.
Would you care to explain?
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by Ranjeep)
Would you care to explain?
I don't really have an explanation; it just says that in the book xD But I suppose it could be significant due to the fact that it would mean that the German Army would only be able to do what the Nazis told them to do (due to them being controlled by the SS). Although, the army had already sworn an oath to Hitler after Hindenburg's death in 1934, meaning they would have already been doing what Hitler wanted them to do.
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KieranPRTL
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finally I found a thread on the exam I'm taking!
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Ranjeep
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I don't really have an explanation; it just says that in the book xD But I suppose it could be significant due to the fact that it would mean that the German Army would only be able to do what the Nazis told them to do (due to them being controlled by the SS). Although, the army had already sworn an oath to Hitler after Hindenburg's death in 1934, meaning they would have already been doing what Hitler wanted them to do.
What was Streseman's role in Weimar Germany, and how did he help Germany?
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by KieranPRTL)
finally I found a thread on the exam I'm taking!
I couldn't find one either xD Welcome
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KieranPRTL
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I couldn't find one either xD Welcome
Cheers! Btw do you have or know any ideas about what will be coming up? Could really do with someone pointing me in the right direction, because I have no clue where to begin revising
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by Ranjeep)
What was Streseman's role in Weimar Germany, and how did he help Germany?
When he was the Chancellor, the first thing he did was to call off the passive resistance in the Ruhr, so that the government no longer needed to pay the workers. Then, in order to solve the hyper-inflation that was caused by the government paying the workers due to the Ruhr invasion, Stresemann recalled all of the old currency and replaced it with the Rentenmark; this stabilised the economy.

Then, when he was the Foreign Minister, he did various things: the Dawes Plan (1924), the Locarno Pact (1925), the League of Nations (1926) and the Young Plan (1929).

Dawes Plan: reduced and rescheduled the reparations. It also gave money to Germany in order to kick start German industry, but in doing so this made Germany dependent upon the USA.

Locarno Pact: Germany accepted the western borders that were in place due to the Treaty of Versailles (and therefore promised that German wouldn't invade France or Belgium).

The League of Nations: This regained Germany's international status. Although, some Germans didn't like this as the League of Nations was associated with the Treaty of Versailles.

Young Plan: Reduced the reparations by 67%, and also rescheduled them.

What happened during the power struggle between 1930 and 1933?
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by KieranPRTL)
Cheers! Btw do you have or know any ideas about what will be coming up? Could really do with someone pointing me in the right direction, because I have no clue where to begin revising
I'm afraid I don't know what's coming up, but I think that Munich Putsch came up last year if that helps
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KieranPRTL
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I'm afraid I don't know what's coming up, but I think that Munich Putsch came up last year if that helps
Ah OK I doubt that will come up, thank's for informing me! One thing I was wondering that has got me puzzled, question 1d in section A, how do you structure it?
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by KieranPRTL)
Ah OK I doubt that will come up, thank's for informing me! One thing I was wondering that has got me puzzled, question 1d in section A, how do you structure it?
I've been taught to write about the content, provenance (author, time), knowledge, and the limitations of the source
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KieranPRTL
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
I've been taught to write about the content, provenance (author, time), knowledge, and the limitations of the source
Thank's for all the info m8! Guess I'll just learn all the content from now, one thing I may struggle with is the timing, my teacher never taught me how long to spend on each question
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undercxver
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I got some exam style questions for you guys to answer. Miss out any that may be irrelevant to your specification. If you need help with any of them then give me a heads up.

Spoiler:
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How effectively did the Nazis control Germany in the years 1933–1945?

How did Hitler create a dictatorship?

How successful were the Nazis in rebuilding the German economy?

How successful were the Nazis in rebuilding the German economy?

How successful were the Nazis in influencing young people?

How successful were the Nazis in influencing young people?

How important in Germany were Nazis' ideas on race?

How did the Nazis change the cultural climate of Weimar Germany?

What were the weaknesses and strengths of Weimar democracy?

How was Hitler able to come to power?
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Ranjeep
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(Original post by nerdyminion)
What happened during the power struggle between 1930 and 1933?
There was a big power struggle between 1930 and 1933. At first, there was Bruning as the Chancellor. He convinced Hindenburg to use Article 48 to make decrees instead of using the Reichstag, and this resulted in over 109 decrees being passed between 1930 - 1932. This also resulted in Burning becoming unpopular, and so Hindenburg, after being convinced by an Army general called Von Schleich, Bruning was replaced with Von Papen as the chancellor.

Von Papen was the next chancellor, he was from the Central Party. However, he did not have enough support from the Reichstag. The Reichstag did a vote to see if he would stay as Chancellor, but he was taken down. Then Von Schleicher became the chancellor for only two months.

However, he didn't have that much support. Von Papen saw an opening, he still wanted power. So he made a secret deal with Hitler and Hindenburg and asked Hindenburg to make Hitler the next chancellor. Thier only mistake was that they believed that they could make Hitler their puppet.
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nerdyminion
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(Original post by Ranjeep)
There was a big power struggle between 1930 and 1933. At first, there was Bruning as the Chancellor. He convinced Hindenburg to use Article 48 to make decrees instead of using the Reichstag, and this resulted in over 109 decrees being passed between 1930 - 1932. This also resulted in Burning becoming unpopular, and so Hindenburg, after being convinced by an Army general called Von Schleich, Bruning was replaced with Von Papen as the chancellor.

Von Papen was the next chancellor, he was from the Central Party. However, he did not have enough support from the Reichstag. The Reichstag did a vote to see if he would stay as Chancellor, but he was taken down. Then Von Schleicher became the chancellor for only two months.

However, he didn't have that much support. Von Papen saw an opening, he still wanted power. So he made a secret deal with Hitler and Hindenburg and asked Hindenburg to make Hitler the next chancellor. Thier only mistake was that they believed that they could make Hitler their puppet.
I would also say that Bruning used Artice 48 to pass decrees to tax foreign food (making food more expensive for everyone) and to cut unemployment benefits, which led to him being unpopular. Additionally, Hitler was willing to accept the deal with Von Papen due to the fact that the Nazi party had lost a few votes in the November 1932 elections.
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jamestg
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A-level History student over here studying Germany 1918-89!!

Any questions just ask me! Studying this period of history for many years now from Y9 all the way until Y13!

Questions that could come up...
"To what extent was the work of Stresseman successful?"
"Did the Nazis rely on popular support in keeping hold of power?"
"Was the Treaty of Versailles the main reason for the Nazi's rise to power?"
"The Weimar Constituion was the main reason why Weimar Germany collapsed" Discuss.

I've only ever done Edexcel history, but most of the questions are transferable.
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jamestg
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(Original post by KieranPRTL)
Thank's for all the info m8! Guess I'll just learn all the content from now, one thing I may struggle with is the timing, my teacher never taught me how long to spend on each question
Treat it as roughly a mark per minute. Spend 20mins minimum on the essay question though. Planning is key, and always write dates and/or stats off your plan's points.
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