Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

I think I've stumbled upon an idea which works. Anyone else noticed this before? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    So I'm not gonna go out on a limb and say I'm the first to discover this or that this is incredibly helpful because it will rarely come up. Upon doing a test yourself question for Aqa Pure Core 4 Chapter 5 (Cartesian/Parametric Equations) I discovered that; (a^2)((c+d)/a)^2=(c+d)^2. Does that make any sense? It's hard to type it out correctly but like I said this will rarely come up but I managed to find an alternative answer to the text book. Has anyone else noticed this before or this just really obvious? lol
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    Community Assistant
    Study Helper
    (Original post by WillFarndon)
    So I'm not gonna go out on a limb and say I'm the first to discover this or that this is incredibly helpful because it will rarely come up. Upon doing a test yourself question for Aqa Pure Core 4 Chapter 5 (Cartesian/Parametric Equations) I discovered that; (a^2)((c+d)/a)^2=(c+d)^2. Does that make any sense? It's hard to type it out correctly but like I said this will rarely come up but I managed to find an alternative answer to the text book. Has anyone else noticed this before or this just really obvious? lol
    \displaystyle a^2 \times \left(\frac{c+d}{a}\right)^2 = a^2 \times \frac{(c+d)^2}{a^2} = (c+d)^2

    I'm not sure what you mean when you say it's an alternative answer to your textbook.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    a^2 \left( \frac{(c+d)}{a} \right)^2 = a^2 \left (\frac{(c+d)^2}{a^2} \right) = (c+d)^2

    Edit: Second consecutive post I got ninjaed.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by notnek)
    \displaystyle a^2 \times \left(\frac{c+d}{a}\right)^2 = a^2 \times \frac{(c+d)^2}{a^2} = (c+d)^2

    I'm not sure what you mean when you say it's an alternative answer to your textbook.
    Basically he thinks that this is some exceedingly important and non-trivial result, when in fact it follows simply by basic algebra. WillFarndon, this result is indeed really obvious.

    (Original post by WillFarndon)
    So I'm not gonna go out on a limb and say I'm the first to discover this or that this is incredibly helpful because it will rarely come up. Upon doing a test yourself question for Aqa Pure Core 4 Chapter 5 (Cartesian/Parametric Equations) I discovered that; (a^2)((c+d)/a)^2=(c+d)^2. Does that make any sense? It's hard to type it out correctly but like I said this will rarely come up but I managed to find an alternative answer to the text book. Has anyone else noticed this before or this just really obvious? lol
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    So you discovered how powers and fractions work..
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    lol yer, Well hey, I was proud of myself when I figured it out :P Sorry if it seemed 'obvious'...(that really did hurt lol)
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    Community Assistant
    Study Helper
    (Original post by WillFarndon)
    lol yer, Well hey, I was proud of myself when I figured it out :P Sorry if it seemed 'obvious'...(that really did hurt lol)
    I remember coming up with stuff when I was doing maths at school. I used to wonder if I was the only one who had thought of it. It generally turned out that I wasn't!

    But don't let this put you off
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WillFarndon)
    lol yer, Well hey, I was proud of myself when I figured it out :P Sorry if it seemed 'obvious'...(that really did hurt lol)
    (Original post by notnek)
    I remember coming up with stuff when I was doing maths at school. I used to wonder if I was the only one who had thought of it. It generally turned out that I wasn't!

    But don't let this put you off
    I don't see what the problem with figuring out 'obvious things' is. The thing that matters is that you discovered them without guidance.

    Richard Feynman would use to draw lots of triangles for fun and by playing around with the angles, he ended up proving all the common trig identities himself, that the squares of the sine and cosine of the same angle in a triangle summed to 1, etc... just because they were obvious facts didn't make it any less impressible that you did it by yourself.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    Maths

    Maths Forum posting guidelines

    Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

    Equations

    How to use LaTex

    Writing equations the easy way

    Student revising

    Study habits of A* students

    Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

    Study Planner

    Create your own Study Planner

    Never miss a deadline again

    Polling station sign

    Thinking about a maths degree?

    Chat with other maths applicants

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.