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Job requires fluency in 2 languages, but I only know one Watch

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    I am British Born Chinese and having repeatedly rejected my parent's offer to send me to Chinese school when I was younger, I had a feeling that the decision would come back to drill me in the ass... and it did.

    I applied to quite a prestigious company for a graduate role with an option to work in various places like Asia or America. I had not initially applied to the Asia scheme but they called me after I finished an exam and I was intoxicated from the celebrations. When they had asked me if I was interested in the Asia scheme I said yes without thinking.

    Anyway, they accepted my application and I am through to the interview stage. Unfortunately from reading the graduate scheme description it says I should be fluent in English and Cantonese/Mandarin. I don't speak a word of Cantonese/Mandarin and my interview is in 2 days. I can't reach fluency in 2 days!! To think that I come from a Chinese background and not be able to speak the language is embarrassing.

    Should I just not bother turning up to save myself from embarrassment? They are bound to ask me questions in Mandarin... But the job sounds so good, I've always dreamed of working abroad but I don't think I'll get this job now...
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    You must know a bit surely? Did your parents speak it around you as a child?

    Don't flunk it, just try your luck. Learn the basics as much as you can from your parents. In the interview say that you haven't spoken it in a few years but you'll defo improve it before the role. That's the best chance you have i suppose...

    Ur one of my fav people on here btw
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    (Original post by donutellme)
    You must know a bit surely? Did your parents speak it around you as a child?

    Don't flunk it, just try your luck. Learn the basics as much as you can from your parents. In the interview say that you haven't spoken it in a few years but you'll defo improve it before the role. That's the best chance you have i suppose...

    Ur one of my fav people on here btw
    Hey! My Chinese is very limited. I know food and basic greetings but say I'm meeting with a client, I might need to know more than that.

    And thank you :hugs:
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    (Original post by UWS)
    Hey! My Chinese is very limited. I know food and basic greetings but say I'm meeting with a client, I might need to know more than that.

    And thank you :hugs:
    You'll have to learn enough to get by in the interview. Make it clear you haven't spoken it in a while though, and say you'll learn before going on the job
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    (Original post by UWS)
    I am British Born Chinese and having repeatedly rejected my parent's offer to send me to Chinese school when I was younger, I had a feeling that the decision would come back to drill me in the ass... and it did.

    I applied to quite a prestigious company for a graduate role with an option to work in various places like Asia or America. I had not initially applied to the Asia scheme but they called me after I finished an exam and I was intoxicated from the celebrations. When they had asked me if I was interested in the Asia scheme I said yes without thinking.

    Anyway, they accepted my application and I am through to the interview stage. Unfortunately from reading the graduate scheme description it says I should be fluent in English and Cantonese/Mandarin. I don't speak a word of Cantonese/Mandarin and my interview is in 2 days. I can't reach fluency in 2 days!! To think that I come from a Chinese background and not be able to speak the language is embarrassing.

    Should I just not bother turning up to save myself from embarrassment? They are bound to ask me questions in Mandarin... But the job sounds so good, I've always dreamed of working abroad but I don't think I'll get this job now...
    Yay another British Born Chinese (BBC, and so am I!). Anyway I too didn't bother with Chinese school when I was younger but after much persuasion from parents I eventually did and it was worth it!
    In my opinion it is a little bit embarrassing for you to not speak the language but its quite normal now...even my cousins and relatives doesn't speak a word of Cantonese (not even Mandarin, because our parents are from Hong Kong) and one of my cousins is ABC (American Born Chinese) so she didn't bother going to Chinese school.

    My parents (well my mum in particular) are bugging me to move to Hong Kong to get a job and to have a better life there (because Cameron doesn't believe people should have jobs here), but I'd rather live here and get the experience I can if I'm being honest.

    I would still go for the interview, but maybe state that you can develop the language there by studying? (Just an advice)? It still isn't too late.

    What language do your parents speak at home? (Hoping the answer is Cantonese!)
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    Yay another British Born Chinese (BBC, and so am I!). Anyway I too didn't bother with Chinese school when I was younger but after much persuasion from parents I eventually did and it was worth it!
    In my opinion it is a little bit embarrassing for you to not speak the language but its quite normal now...even my cousins and relatives doesn't speak a word of Cantonese (not even Mandarin, because our parents are from Hong Kong) and one of my cousins is ABC (American Born Chinese) so she didn't bother going to Chinese school.

    My parents (well my mum in particular) are bugging me to move to Hong Kong to get a job and to have a better life there (because Cameron doesn't believe people should have jobs here), but I'd rather live here and get the experience I can if I'm being honest.

    I would still go for the interview, but maybe state that you can develop the language there by studying? (Just an advice)? It still isn't too late.

    What language do your parents speak at home? (Hoping the answer is Cantonese!)
    Another BBC! Hi!

    Well I just had my interview and I told them I'm willing to learn. I said i was a beginner lol. Hopefully I get the job.

    Well my mum speaks Hokkien because she's from Malaysia and she knows a bit of Cantonese and Mandarin. I just don't pay attention when she's speaking to her friends lol
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    (Original post by UWS)
    Another BBC! Hi!

    Well I just had my interview and I told them I'm willing to learn. I said i was a beginner lol. Hopefully I get the job.

    Well my mum speaks Hokkien because she's from Malaysia and she knows a bit of Cantonese and Mandarin. I just don't pay attention when she's speaking to her friends lol
    That's how I pick up the language (obviously I pay attention)!
    My mum speaks Cantonese (because of my dad) and Hakka (she's from a remote farming village in rural area of Hong Kong) but mainly speaks Hakka to her friends so I do know that particular language a lot.

    I practically love speaking another language as its another talent I could use at work and my friends and work colleagues think its great (and they fail miserably when I teach them to speak it)!
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    Just emphasise that you're 'rusty' from not living at home for a while or something, blag your way through the interview using chinglish (say everything in chinese and use english for the technical words) and maybe it'll look convincing. These days when you watch chinese news and shows they use chinglish casually anyway
 
 
 
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