AnonymousAnswer
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Hi, I wanted to know how can you determine what direction a point on the wave is travelling when given a snapshot of the wave. my book says something about the displacement being greater on the left side of the point than the actual therefore moving up and if smaller then moving downwards but i don't really understand what it means by that. if you have any understanding please help
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Dowel
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(Original post by AnonymousAnswer)
Hi, I wanted to know how can you determine what direction a point on the wave is travelling when given a snapshot of the wave. my book says something about the displacement being greater on the left side of the point than the actual therefore moving up and if smaller then moving downwards but i don't really understand what it means by that. if you have any understanding please help
Firstly you need to know that the wave is moving horizontally but the particle is moving vertically as the amplitude in the same plane as it movement changes.
So if the amplitude of the wave to the left of the particle is larger the particle is about to go up, if the amplitude of the wave to the left of the particle is smaller then the particle is about to go down.
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AnonymousAnswer
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(Original post by Dowel)
Firstly you need to know that the wave is moving horizontally but the particle is moving vertically as the amplitude in the same plane as it movement changes.
So if the amplitude of the wave to the left of the particle is larger the particle is about to go up, if the amplitude of the wave to the left of the particle is smaller then the particle is about to go down.
Thanks that cleared quite a bit up, just wanted to know is it directly to the left of the particle, or half of the wavelength. any specific distance away from the particle
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Dowel
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(Original post by AnonymousAnswer)
Thanks that cleared quite a bit up, just wanted to know is it directly to the left of the particle, or half of the wavelength. any specific distance away from the particle
A question will give you a specific distance, it depends on the position of the particle to start with.

But if there is no specific distance then take it as directly left of the particle.
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AnonymousAnswer
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(Original post by Dowel)
A question will give you a specific distance, it depends on the position of the particle to start with.

But if there is no specific distance then take it as directly left of the particle.
ok thanks
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