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    Does anyone know whether after a year of studying Education Studies full time at the OU I'll be able to transfer the credits onto a brick uni to continue my second and third year?
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    The answer is yes. The Open University gives you transferrable credits just like any other university. I studied my Masters degree with the Open University so I know this. After the first year you can receive a certificate of higher education in Education Studies. You can then use this to complete the final 2 years of your course at any university you choose.
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    (Original post by Powersymphonia)
    The answer is yes. The Open University gives you transferrable credits just like any other university. I studied my Masters degree with the Open University so I know this. After the first year you can receive a certificate of higher education in Education Studies. You can then use this to complete the final 2 years of your course at any university you choose.
    Thank you so much for answering. Definitely put me at ease.
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    (Original post by Sanaa101)
    Thank you so much for answering. Definitely put me at ease.
    You can also transfer from one brick uni to another, as long as you meet the entry requirements of the course they offer.
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    (Original post by Powersymphonia)
    The answer is yes. The Open University gives you transferrable credits just like any other university. I studied my Masters degree with the Open University so I know this. After the first year you can receive a certificate of higher education in Education Studies. You can then use this to complete the final 2 years of your course at any university you choose.
    This is wrong. If you don't know the answer to someone's question, you really shouldn't answer.

    (Original post by Sanaa101)
    snip
    Open University first year modules are generally not comparable with 'brick' university first year modules. It is highly unlikely that any university would let a student transfer into the second year of a degree with only OU first year modules. In order to transfer between universities, the university you're applying to must be confident that any modules you've already studied are compatible with their own and that you've studied exactly the same things as their own first year students. The problem is OU level 1 modules are designed for people without any qualifications, they introduce students to new subjects in a very broad way which makes it very unlikely that you will have the specific subject knowledge to enter the second year of a brick university Education Studies degree.

    You probably will be able to transfer into the first year of the degree (in effect, using OU modules as an alternative to A levels). I suggest you contact whichever universities you're interested in applying to and ask them what they think.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    This is wrong. If you don't know the answer to someone's question, you really shouldn't answer.



    Open University first year modules are generally not comparable with 'brick' university first year modules. It is highly unlikely that any university would let a student transfer into the second year of a degree with only OU first year modules. In order to transfer between universities, the university you're applying to must be confident that any modules you've already studied are compatible with their own and that you've studied exactly the same things as their own first year students. The problem is OU level 1 modules are designed for people without any qualifications, they introduce students to new subjects in a very broad way which makes it very unlikely that you will have the specific subject knowledge to enter the second year of a brick university Education Studies degree.

    You probably will be able to transfer into the first year of the degree (in effect, using OU modules as an alternative to A levels). I suggest you contact whichever universities you're interested in applying to and ask them what they think.

    I've contacted a few of the universities and they have all said to apply through UCAS for the second year.
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    According to your post history, you're still doing your A levels and you haven't even applied to the OU, so what exactly did you ask the admission tutors in your email? Unless you specifically said "I plan on doing these modules with the Open University, they are worth X number of credits at level 1" then nothing they said can be relied upon.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    According to your post history, you're still doing your A levels and you haven't even applied to the OU, so what exactly did you ask the admission tutors in your email? Unless you specifically said "I plan on doing these modules with the Open University, they are worth X number of credits at level 1" then nothing they said can be relied upon.
    I didn't tell them I'm still doing Alevels. This was the copy of of my emails

    'Hi, After my first year of education studies at The Open University would I be able to transfer the credits here to continue my second and third year? The two modules are: Learning and teaching in the primary years (E103) & Introduction to childhood studies and child psychology (E102).

    E103 includes:

    - knowledge of the nature of primary education today

    - insights into how children learn, and what adults can do to promote their learning

    - an understanding of the principles that underpin primary education policy and classroom practice

    - an awareness of some current theories and research that support primary education

    - insights into issues relating to race equality and social inclusion and the implications for practice

    - an appreciation of the complementary nature of home and school learning and the role of parents and the family in children’s education

    -skills related to academic reading and writing, including studying effectively online

    -the ability to plan for and review your own academic and professional learning.

    E102 includes:

    - introduces an interdisciplinary approach to the study of childhood by comparing the different perspectives from childhood studies and child psychology. The units will consider some of the complex influences that shape children’s lives and the role of educational research with children.

    - considers early social and emotional development with a focus on supporting the lives of children. There is a particular focus on policies around parenting and families, protecting and supporting children in a digital world and on promoting the welfare of children in today’s challenging society.

    - addresses issues around diversity and examines how children’s lives are shaped by particular social and cultural ideologies. These units will introduce you to a range of core issues which include ethnicity, religion, international childhoods and disability and how these factors can impact on the lives of children and young people.

    - discusses some of the tensions involved in becoming an adult and some of the obstacles that many children face during this transitional period. These units include the effects of commercialisation in the teenage years, issues around gender and sexuality; supporting young people’s mental health and psychological wellbeing; and the transition into adolescence.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    You explained that you had only done level 1 modules, and they were still happy to consider you for second year entry? I find that extremely hard to believe. Which universities told you this?
    I got offers when I applied to do that. I didn't end up going, but that was for personal reasons.

    And I know other people on TSR who have.
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    (Original post by Sanaa101)
    I didn't tell them I'm still doing Alevels. This was the copy of of my emails

    'Hi, After my first year of education studies at The Open University would I be able to transfer the credits here to continue my second and third year? The two modules are: Learning and teaching in the primary years (E103) & Introduction to childhood studies and child psychology (E102).
    I don't want to be obstinate, but I still think it very unlikely a university would accept OU transfer students with only level 1 modules. This was my experience and I must have spoken to about 25 universities, and I know many more people who had similar experiences. If this one university is prepared to accept you into second year then great, but I'm not convinced it is anywhere close to being common.

    (Original post by Juno)
    I got offers when I applied to do that. I didn't end up going, but that was for personal reasons.

    And I know other people on TSR who have.
    See above. Which people on TSR?

    Edit: Did you get more than one offer? I understood from previous posts that only NTU would accept you for a transfer?
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I don't want to be obstinate, but I still think it very unlikely a university would accept OU transfer students with only level 1 modules. This was my experience and I must have spoken to about 25 universities, and I know many more people who had similar experiences. If this one university is prepared to accept you into second year then great, but I'm not convinced it is anywhere close to being common.



    See above. Which people on TSR?
    Darling, I applied to 5 and I don't have to justify myself to you. You're on my ignore list for a reason and it isn't because you're right.

    But if you really want more proof you're wrong, look up gridiron gangster. I didn't learn how to spell his name but he did amazing things with OU modules. Because it is possible and the OU is not an inferior degree.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    Darling, I applied to 5 and I don't have to justify myself to you. You're on my ignore list for a reason and it isn't because you're right.

    But if you really want more proof you're wrong, look up gridiron gangster. I didn't learn how to spell his name but he did amazing things with OU modules. Because it is possible and the OU is not an inferior degree.
    I don't care if I'm on your ignore list. I suspect it was because I contradicted you somewhere and you don't like being contradicted. Boo hoo.

    The point is the vast majority of universities will not accept first year OU transfers. There may a couple of exceptions, especially if you have relevant work experience (which you had, but most people do not). The user you're talking about did an Open University degree (not modules) and used it to gain entry onto a postgrad degree at Oxford - not sure why you think that is relevant to the OP, all that proves is that OU degrees are respected, something which nobody here has denied. :rolleyes:
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    So an hour ago you knew it wasn't possible at all, and now you've decided that it was only possible because of work experience. Despite you not knowing what OU modules I'd done, what degree I was applying for, or even what work experience I had.

    I love how you've realised your argument has fallen apart so have just moved on to insulting me.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    So an hour ago you knew it wasn't possible at all, and now you've decided that it was only possible because of work experience. Despite you not knowing what OU modules I'd done, what degree I was applying for, or even what work experience I had.

    I love how you've realised your argument has fallen apart so have just moved on to insulting me.
    A lot of unis will allow some students to skip the first year of a degree if they have relevant work experience because the first year counts for almost nothing in the grand scheme of things.

    If you have a certHE from the OU and some relevant work experience of knowledge of the subject then I'm sure that it would be more than possible but for an 19-21 year old who has never had a real job, the likelihood is less so. It is going to be the sort of thing that is judged on a case by case basis and will almost certainly only apply to adult education.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    So an hour ago you knew it wasn't possible at all, and now you've decided that it was only possible because of work experience. Despite you not knowing what OU modules I'd done, what degree I was applying for, or even what work experience I had.

    I love how you've realised your argument has fallen apart so have just moved on to insulting me.
    Don’t put words in my mouth. I didn't say it was absolutely impossible and there are no exceptions; I said it is "highly unlikely" that a university would accept an OU first year transfer, and that's true. My argument hasn't fallen apart.

    Re work experience, I'm only quoting you - you said in another thread that you got into NTU with a 60 credit OU module and relevant work experience. Clearly that work experience was a factor in you getting in or you wouldn't have mentioned it.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Don’t put words in my mouth. I didn't say it was absolutely impossible and there are no exceptions; I said it is "highly unlikely" that a university would accept an OU first year transfer, and that's true. My argument hasn't fallen apart.

    Re work experience, I'm only quoting you - you said in another thread that you got into NTU with a 60 credit OU module and relevant work experience. Clearly that work experience was a factor in you getting in or you wouldn't have mentioned it.
    As someone who has actually studied with Open University, I can say that they are a brilliant institution and I highly recommend them. I got a lot of support from my tutors and access to both good quality printed and online materials, just like any other university. The OU is a highly respected University and because you do more independent study with OU, employers highly value an OU degree, because it shows that the applicant can work independently and use their initiative.

    As to your other comment Snufkin, I only answer threads that I know the answer to. It appears that other respondants to the OP agree with me. I may not be the best person in the world at arguing my opinion and providing evidence of this, but I am not a solicitor, I am just someone who wants to help others in the best way I can. I have studied with the OU and have helped 100s of students to get to university in my job, this is how I know I am right.

    The OP is wanting to study a Level 4-6 qualification, which is the same level as what the brick unis offer. All BAs are divided into 3 stages, with a few exceptions such as sandwich courses and medicine etc. A first year BA Open University course is equivalent to a Level 4 qualification and the 120 credits which are received for this can be exchanged for a qualification called Certificate of Higher Education, Education Studies (Open). This qualification will enable to OP to enter the second year of the course at a different institution. The OP has said that the University they want to go to will accept this, so she has had confirmation.

    Open University do offer introductory courses, but these are Pre-Degree courses. These are 60 credit modules which do not count towards a degree. The OU advise students who are not ready to study at degree level to study one of these introductory courses before embarking on a degree. The OP is studying a BA, not one of these courses.

    All level 4 courses, in other words the first year of any degree at any institution, is designed to prepare students for more intensive university study at years 2 and 3 or Levels 5 and 6. The OU calls these levels Stage 1, 2 and 3. 1= Level 4, 2= Level 5 and 3= Level 6.
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    (Original post by Powersymphonia)
    As someone who has actually studied with Open University, I can say that they are a brilliant institution and I highly recommend them. I got a lot of support from my tutors and access to both good quality printed and online materials, just like any other university. The OU is a highly respected University and because you do more independent study with OU, employers highly value an OU degree, because it shows that the applicant can work independently and use their initiative.

    As to your other comment Snufkin, I only answer threads that I know the answer to. It appears that other respondants to the OP agree with me. I may not be the best person in the world at arguing my opinion and providing evidence of this, but I am not a solicitor, I am just someone who wants to help others in the best way I can. I have studied with the OU and have helped 100s of students to get to university in my job, this is how I know I am right.

    The OP is wanting to study a Level 4-6 qualification, which is the same level as what the brick unis offer. All BAs are divided into 3 stages, with a few exceptions such as sandwich courses and medicine etc. A first year BA Open University course is equivalent to a Level 4 qualification and the 120 credits which are received for this can be exchanged for a qualification called Certificate of Higher Education, Education Studies (Open). This qualification will enable to OP to enter the second year of the course at a different institution. The OP has said that the University they want to go to will accept this, so she has had confirmation.

    Open University do offer introductory courses, but these are Pre-Degree courses. These are 60 credit modules which do not count towards a degree. The OU advise students who are not ready to study at degree level to study one of these introductory courses before embarking on a degree. The OP is studying a BA, not one of these courses.

    All level 4 courses, in other words the first year of any degree at any institution, is designed to prepare students for more intensive university study at years 2 and 3 or Levels 5 and 6. The OU calls these levels Stage 1, 2 and 3. 1= Level 4, 2= Level 5 and 3= Level 6.
    We're not debating whether the Open University is a good and respected university (I agree that it is), but whether level 1 modules are transferable to brick universities. I maintain that for the most part they aren't, you and Juno disagree - fair enough, you're wrong but you can believe what you like.

    I am familiar with how many credits an Open University CertHE has (I have done one myself), and I know that it is a level 4 qualification. But the level of the qualification is not the issue; the reason why most universities won't accept OU level 1 modules for a transfer into the second year is because the content of first year OU modules nearly always doesn't match the content of brick universities' first year modules.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    We're not debating whether the Open University is a good and respected university (I agree that it is), but whether level 1 modules are transferable to brick universities. I maintain that for the most part they aren't, you and Juno disagree - fair enough, you're wrong but you can believe what you like.

    I am familiar with how many credits an Open University CertHE has (I have done one myself), and I know that it is a level 4 qualification. But the level of the qualification is not the issue; the reason why most universities won't accept OU level 1 modules for a transfer into the second year is because the content of first year OU modules nearly always doesn't match the content of brick universities' first year modules.

    I completely agree with you but at the end of the day, almost all British universities don't really teach anything of relevance in the first year. First year's are mostly just designed to teach people the fundamentals of academic writing and the very basics of their chosen subject path plus hopefully encourage the students to get the partying and slacking off out of their system without doing any real lasting damage.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    We're not debating whether the Open University is a good and respected university (I agree that it is), but whether level 1 modules are transferable to brick universities. I maintain that for the most part they aren't, you and Juno disagree - fair enough, you're wrong but you can believe what you like.

    I am familiar with how many credits an Open University CertHE has (I have done one myself), and I know that it is a level 4 qualification. But the level of the qualification is not the issue; the reason why most universities won't accept OU level 1 modules for a transfer into the second year is because the content of first year OU modules nearly always doesn't match the content of brick universities' first year modules.
    I've looked at the OU first year modules for Education Studies and compared them to the modules offered at other universities and the content seems to be very similar and the OU is around the same difficulty as the other courses. The main difference is that the course offered by OU is divided into 2 60 credit modules and the brick unis mainly have courses divided into smaller 20 and 10 credit modules. The subject content that is learned by the student, and the amount of assessments that have to be completed are very similar. The only main difference really is how the course is divided into modules.

    The content of all unis differs in some respects, for example the course offered at Cardiff is different from that offered at Roehampton, but they generally cover topics such as child development, safeguarding children and child psychology.
 
 
 
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