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What are your Top Tips to help your stress during exam season? Watch

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    Exam season is a very stressful time for most students, and it can have a big impact on Mental Health. What are your top tips to help your Mental Health during exam season?

    Mine would be setting aside time to see friends and having downtime. If you revise too much you're going to burn yourself out and it'll only have negative affects. Remember to reward yourself for getting work done - even if it's as simple as a sweet every x pages read or notes written :yum:

    Having others goals alongside academia is also a way to ensure not all of your focus is on one thing, for example fitness goals or reading a set amount of books in your leisure time :dumbells:

    Most importantly, remember you are worth more than a letter on a piece of paper, things have a funny way of working out, and academia does not define you!

    Have you got any inspirational quotes or images which help you?

    :grouphugs:
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    Make sure you're taking time out for yourself still, and having time to relax in some way - you're not a robot, you can't work 24/7, and no-one is expecting you to! Set aside an evening a week to spend with your friends, or family, and have some proper time away from your books.

    Don't try and compare your work levels to everyone else; everyone has their own pace, and trying to over commit yourself is a sure fire way to burn out, whereas doing less than you feel you can will make up feel stressed too.

    Most importantly: If you feel you're struggling too much, then talk to someone! It's best to do this sooner rather than later, as it gives more time for you to get the support you need. Whilst it isn't always easy to ask for help, it's better that than push yourself too hard, and your health is always more important than a grade.
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    Tbh i didn't do much, i am guilty of pushing it all to the back of my mind and thinking that basically nothing is going to stop me getting these grades.
    Resulted in numerous breakdowns, lots of crying and other erm things although the exams are now over and well i still feel bad for other reasons but i think the exams went well so dont do what i did but do it a bit because hard work pays off and i think it was worth all of the despair.
    That was probably the worst advice ever but meh
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    The biggest tip I can give is inform your school, college or uni about your mental health issues before your exams. It can be very hard opening up but if you suffer from things like anxiety and panic attacks, there's nothing worse than sitting in a dead silent exam room with about 50 other people and all you can feel and hear is your heart pounding and the walls closing in. That is not the right stance to take a test in and will only add extra tension and will add to your anxiety issues outside the exam room, let alone inside it. When you are in that state, you can't think about anything on that sheet of paper and that can affect your result.

    If you talk to your school, they can make arrangements for you to sit in a room with just you and an invigilator or maybe just a couple more students and that can make a huge difference. You might still panic during an exam in that situation but its a much calmer situation to be in a room with just a few people who know your anxiety issues than be with 50 people who don't know anything is wrong with you and that makes you feel even worse and you take an even tighter hold of yourself which only makes you more tense.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Tbh i didn't do much, i am guilty of pushing it all to the back of my mind and thinking that basically nothing is going to stop me getting these grades.
    Resulted in numerous breakdowns, lots of crying and other erm things although the exams are now over and well i still feel bad for other reasons but i think the exams went well so dont do what i did but do it a bit because hard work pays off and i think it was worth all of the despair.
    That was probably the worst advice ever but meh
    Sorry to hear this :hugs: So using this as a good experience to learn from, what would you want to do to help you in similar situations in the future?
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    For me personally, my anxiety during exams is triggered when I come across a difficult question which takes me ages to work out and then I start thinking "omg i've wasted 20 minutes on this 3 mark question, now i'm going to fail bla bla bla" and then I can't concentrate on the rest of the paper.
    I've recently realised that this can be overcome by just doing all of the questions that I am confident with first and by the time i've finished , I have about 30 minutes left to try the difficult questions and I feel a lot calmer doing them this way.
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    (Original post by jessyjellytot14)
    For me personally, my anxiety during exams is triggered when I come across a difficult question which takes me ages to work out and then I start thinking "omg i've wasted 20 minutes on this 3 mark question, now i'm going to fail bla bla bla" and then I can't concentrate on the rest of the paper.
    I've recently realised that this can be overcome by just doing all of the questions that I am confident with first and by the time i've finished , I have about 30 minutes left to try the difficult questions and I feel a lot calmer doing them this way.
    I was told to go through the paper first and do the questions I can do and then go back and do the harder ones. At least then, I've not wasted half my time on that 5 mark question whilst having 4 or 5 questions I need to do.

    I was told to revise for an hour or so and then take a break. Even if it's just to get some food, a drink or go for a walk. I tend to switch off or get bored if I revise for too long.
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    Looking after your health in general has to be the absolute top one for me- sleep, food, breaks, exercise etc. It might not seem that important but without this you can't do anything! As Shadow said, they're not worth making yourself ill over, however hard it might be not to sometimes.

    I wrote this thread for mental health awareness week which has a lot of more general stuff in too, mostly for the runup to exams but a bit on the day too.


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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Sorry to hear this :hugs: So using this as a good experience to learn from, what would you want to do to help you in similar situations in the future?
    In all honesty and I know this is bad, I can forsee myself in the same position next year, there was a few things that helped but I wouldn't advise them at all tbh.
    Apart from running that helped I guess because I took my revision book with me and read it as I ran along (don't do that in a heavy traffic area though..) I only do that cos I live in the middle of nowhere
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    Kalm Tablets. They are herbal non addictive. They do work, helped me through my driving test too.

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    Exercise, exercise and more exercise
    Works for me
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    We find that working out whether you’re a verbal or visual learner can help to identify which relaxation techniques which may be useful for you. Verbal learners tend to move their tongue and throat muscles when thinking. If this sounds like you, concentrate on relaxing those muscles.

    Visual learners often find their eyes move more frequently when they’re closed. If this is you, try concentrating on a spot in front of you, just below eye level. After a while, close your eyes completely while still visualising that spot. This should help you to feel more relaxed. Activities like yoga and tai chi can also help to reduce stress.

    Hope that helps! We've got some more expert advice here too: www.bcu.ac.uk/expert-exam-tips

    Good luck all, concentrate on your festival plans for the summer
 
 
 
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