Questions about Linux

Watch this thread
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
So I'm vaguely familiar with Linux being an alternate OS to Windows etc, and I want to try it using a Command Line Interface, as opposed to a Graphic User Interface, which is all I hear about when searching about getting started on Linux.

So my question is: How do I go about getting Linux and using it in CLI form? I don't want to replace it as the main OS on my computer, so is there some sort of way I can just have it on the side for whenever I feel like using it?
0
reply
Chrosson
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by longshot100)
So I'm vaguely familiar with Linux being an alternate OS to Windows etc, and I want to try it using a Command Line Interface, as opposed to a Graphic User Interface, which is all I hear about when searching about getting started on Linux.

So my question is: How do I go about getting Linux and using it in CLI form? I don't want to replace it as the main OS on my computer, so is there some sort of way I can just have it on the side for whenever I feel like using it?
If you've never used Linux before, my suggestions would be to install Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop) and install it on a virtual machine (virtualbox).

Safe for your computer and easy to get rid of if you don't like it.

Using it via the cli is just a matter of starting the 'terminal' application once you've booted up.
2
reply
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Chrosson)
If you've never used Linux before, my suggestions would be to install Ubuntu (http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop) and install it on a virtual machine (virtualbox).

Safe for your computer and easy to get rid of if you don't like it.

Using it via the cli is just a matter of starting the 'terminal' application once you've booted up.
Thanks!!!!
btw, Could you give me a brief explanation on what a Virtual Machine is, if possible?

And I assume that the Terminal application is within Ubuntu?
0
reply
username2653977
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by longshot100)
Thanks!!!!
btw, Could you give me a brief explanation on what a Virtual Machine is, if possible?

And I assume that the Terminal application is within Ubuntu?
Okay, so the Oracle Virtual Machine (VM) is in short; an application which allows you to run an immutable operating system, this means that if you ran Windows 7 on a VM, and you got infected with a virus, the VM could become absolutely ruined, but it would not affect your base OS. You will also need to partion (separate) your storage device so that a part of it can run on the separate OS. So if you want to have it as a near-replacement then you may want to dedicate 100gb+, along with the majority of your RAM.

Ubuntu is a flavour of Linux. There are lots and lots of flavours, the reason why Ubuntu is so popular, is that it uses the GNOME Command Line Interpreter, (CLI), you will find this under 'Terminal' on the stock Ubuntu software. This is an easy-to-learn command line which is much more favoured over the Windows CMD as Linux was initially Unix which was purely a command line interpreter, before GUI's came with OS's.

If you would like, as part of a GCSE assessment last year, I had to make a huge essay on the Ubuntu CLI, running on a Virtual Machine which would provide you with a good introduction into using the Ubuntu CLI in a immutable environment. The document is too large to attach here, so if you would like it then you'll need to pm me your email.

Lastly, what you want to do is a great idea. I have benefitted from it vastly. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. I've just done my best to answer what you asked. Also all this information is just done on knowledge and may not be solely accurate. If you need to re-use this information I advise you Google it to check!
1
reply
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by GaryIsASloth)
Okay, so the Oracle Virtual Machine (VM) is in short; an application which allows you to run an immutable operating system, this means that if you ran Windows 7 on a VM, and you got infected with a virus, the VM could become absolutely ruined, but it would not affect your base OS. You will also need to partion (separate) your storage device so that a part of it can run on the separate OS. So if you want to have it as a near-replacement then you may want to dedicate 100gb+, along with the majority of your RAM.

Ubuntu is a flavour of Linux. There are lots and lots of flavours, the reason why Ubuntu is so popular, is that it uses the GNOME Command Line Interpreter, (CLI), you will find this under 'Terminal' on the stock Ubuntu software. This is an easy-to-learn command line which is much more favoured over the Windows CMD as Linux was initially Unix which was purely a command line interpreter, before GUI's came with OS's.

If you would like, as part of a GCSE assessment last year, I had to make a huge essay on the Ubuntu CLI, running on a Virtual Machine which would provide you with a good introduction into using the Ubuntu CLI in a immutable environment. The document is too large to attach here, so if you would like it then you'll need to pm me your email.

Lastly, what you want to do is a great idea. I have benefitted from it vastly. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. I've just done my best to answer what you asked. Also all this information is just done on knowledge and may not be solely accurate. If you need to re-use this information I advise you Google it to check!
Thank you so much!!! I'll PM you an email you can send it to later, when I get the chance
0
reply
username2653977
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by longshot100)
Thank you so much!!! I'll PM you an email you can send it to later, when I get the chance
I've not got much life so I'm always around to answer things
0
reply
drogon
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
judging by your profile pic im guessing you're aiming to use kali
0
reply
ChaoticButterfly
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by longshot100)
So I'm vaguely familiar with Linux being an alternate OS to Windows etc, and I want to try it using a Command Line Interface, as opposed to a Graphic User Interface, which is all I hear about when searching about getting started on Linux.

So my question is: How do I go about getting Linux and using it in CLI form? I don't want to replace it as the main OS on my computer, so is there some sort of way I can just have it on the side for whenever I feel like using it?
You can do this thing called a duel boot where when you PC starts it will give an option for which OS you want to use.

There are different version of linux. Ubuntu is a GUI (like windows you can do most things via clicking on button and dragging windows etc) version of the OS. You also get access to the command prompt when using Ubuntu.
1
reply
username2653977
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
This website literally covers everything so I highly recommend using this as your guide or at least scanning through it, if you decide to dual boot your pc like ChaoticButterfly explained.
http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/201...alongside.html
0
reply
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by drogon)
judging by your profile pic im guessing you're aiming to use kali
Is Kali another type of Linux? If so, what benefits are there to it? Is it suitable for beginners?
0
reply
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
You can do this thing called a duel boot where when you PC starts it will give an option for which OS you want to use.

There are different version of linux. Ubuntu is a GUI (like windows you can do most things via clicking on button and dragging windows etc) version of the OS. You also get access to the command prompt when using Ubuntu.
(Original post by GaryIsASloth)
This website literally covers everything so I highly recommend using this as your guide or at least scanning through it, if you decide to dual boot your pc like ChaoticButterfly explained.
http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/201...alongside.html
Thank you!!!
0
reply
drogon
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by longshot100)
Is Kali another type of Linux? If so, what benefits are there to it? Is it suitable for beginners?
yes it's primarily used by hackers and no, it isnt suitable for beginners since it doesnt have a GUI and is very complex.
1
reply
longshot100
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by drogon)
yes it's primarily used by hackers and no, it isnt suitable for beginners since it doesnt have a GUI and is very complex.
Ah, gotcha. Guess I'll have to try that out one day XD
0
reply
GiantKiwi
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 6 years ago
#14
(Original post by drogon)
yes it's primarily used by hackers and no, it isnt suitable for beginners since it doesnt have a GUI
Actually this is wrong, the GUI is a selectable option on install, it just depends on the intended use. Also I object to your definition of it being for hackers. It's primarily for penetration testing.
1
reply
drogon
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 6 years ago
#15
(Original post by iainvg)
Actually this is wrong, the GUI is a selectable option on install, it just depends on the intended use. Also I object to your definition of it being for hackers. It's primarily for penetration testing.
Im no expert but im sure most of the little programs in the softwares are done with command lines and require knowledge of networking.

And yh, pen testers are also called ethical hackers.
0
reply
1420787
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 6 years ago
#16
I'm more a casual user rather than computing-minded, but tried Ubuntu out on an old laptop that was struggling with Windows 8. I found it quick and clean, nice and straightforward.

I couldn't use it for my main PC though, as a Linux isn't heavily supported enough for some of the things I mainly use my PC for. Working from home would be an issue too, as fantastic as Libre Office is.
1
reply
GiantKiwi
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 6 years ago
#17
(Original post by offhegoes)
I couldn't use it for my main PC though, as a Linux isn't heavily supported enough for some of the things I mainly use my PC for.
Like?

Games - Linux does it. (Steam)
Design Applications - yup. (GIMP/Scribus/Draw/OpenShot/Blender/Apache Flex)
Media - with ease. (VLC)
Office - Of course. (WPS Office)

Struggling to see the issue.
0
reply
1420787
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 6 years ago
#18
(Original post by iainvg)
Like?

Games - Linux does it. (Steam)
Design Applications - yup. (GIMP/Scribus/Draw/OpenShot/Blender/Apache Flex)
Media - with ease. (VLC)
Office - Of course. (WPS Office)

Struggling to see the issue.
Smart Notebook (for work) and Pro Tools would be the main things I couldn't do without, not to mention the myriad of associated pieces of software I use. I've also heard of issues with getting ASIO drivers to work with some of the audio interfaces I use.

If it was just me I would happily use one of the Ubuntu-friendly DAWs, but when collaborating with others it's a HUGE advantage to all use the same software. Plus all studios pretty much use Pro Tools.
0
reply
NX172
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report 6 years ago
#19
(Original post by iainvg)
Like?

Games - Linux does it. (Steam)
Design Applications - yup. (GIMP/Scribus/Draw/OpenShot/Blender/Apache Flex)
Media - with ease. (VLC)
Office - Of course. (WPS Office)

Struggling to see the issue.
I believe in using the right tools for the job. Just because it can, doesn't mean it should.

Yeah, I can use Gimp instead of Photoshop, I could use OpenOffice instead of MS Office. But gimp isn't going to cut the ice for professional designers, for tablet drawing Corel Painter is usually better than Photoshop - neither of which are on Linux. Personally, I don't even use Steam that much, rather, I play a lot of MMOs that require a Windows environment to run. You can try to WINE some simpler applications but things like Photoshop under WINE are pretty buggy.

We would use Windows servers for server dashboards at work. Whereas the services themselves obviously run on RHEL machines, where it would be easier to diagnose problems, log errors and automate than Windows. Everything has a use case.

Personally I don't try to replace my life with linux, rather, I integrate its features. If I need a dev environment I boot into Ubuntu. If I need a test server, I bootstrap a CentOS VM running scripts to automatically install all the software I need in a matter of minutes, with profiles, ENV variables and SDKs ready to use. If I want to play a game I reboot into Windows. If I want to paint, I load Corel Painter on Windows.
Life isn't 1 or 0, PC vs Linux or PS4 vs Xbox One. Appreciate the benefits and accept the disadvantages of each platform.
2
reply
Chrosson
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 6 years ago
#20
(Original post by GaryIsASloth)
Ubuntu is a flavour of Linux. There are lots and lots of flavours, the reason why Ubuntu is so popular, is that it uses the GNOME Command Line Interpreter, (CLI), you will find this under 'Terminal' on the stock Ubuntu software. This is an easy-to-learn command line which is much more favoured over the Windows CMD as Linux was initially Unix which was purely a command line interpreter, before GUI's came with OS's.
The first sentence of this is spot on, but the rest made me wince a little. It's close enough to sound right, but it's not very accurate. I'm not sure if this is for simplification purposes (in which case it's probably a little too far) or misunderstanding.

- The reason Ubuntu is so popular has nothing to do with the terminal.
- "GNOME Command Line Interpreter" is not a thing, it's called "GNOME Terminal" and all is does is acts as a display for a shell, allowing you to set colours and so on.
- A shell is the CLI for interacting with Linux, interpreting the commands that you type, running them and returning their output. Because it only deals with text, you use a 'terminal emulator' (like GNOME Terminal) to put a shell in a window that can be displayed on your desktop alongside other windows (like your browser).
- I've never encountered an "easy-to-learn command line". The Linux one requires a very different way of thinking and memory of the cryptic names of commands and their arguments.
- I wouldn't say it's favoured so much as they serve completely different purposes. In Linux, the shell is a crucial building block of the system - you don't have to have a GUI. In modern Windows you basically can't strip the GUI out and the command line is a second class citizen (though Windows has been going to interesting places recently).
(Original post by iainvg)
Like?Games - Linux does it. (Steam)Design Applications - yup. (GIMP/Scribus/Draw/OpenShot/Blender/Apache Flex)Media - with ease. (VLC)Office - Of course. (WPS Office)Struggling to see the issue.
As one example, Linux touchscreen support is pretty poor (e.g. I get kernel panics if I touch the screen too soon after waking Linux up from suspend). I spend most of my time on the command line in Linux because I spend most of my time developing, but I far prefer to use Windows when doing anything else because it's just a nicer experience.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How did The Student Room help you with your university application?

Talking to current university students (19)
18.63%
Talking to peers going through the same thing (35)
34.31%
Speaking to student ambassadors from the universities (6)
5.88%
Speaking to staff members from universities (2)
1.96%
Using the personal statement builder, library or helper service (10)
9.8%
Reading articles about what steps to take (19)
18.63%
Learning about/speaking to Student Finance England (4)
3.92%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (7)
6.86%

Watched Threads

View All