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Why do Sanpellegrino drinks only come in cans? watch

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    And what is the purpose of the sticker?
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    https://www.nestle-waters.com/info
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
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    In the UK it is not stocked (to my knowledge). Also the sticker?
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    You didn't answer the question.
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    Depends on the drinks. I've only ever seen the water in bottles.

    As for the teeth rotting unhealthy but damned nice sugary drinks. No idea. Higher mark up on cans? Distinctive brand identity?
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    (Original post by Melancholy)
    And what is the purpose of the sticker?
    Brand positioning as a premium beverage. The foil on top makes it look smart and creates stand out on the shelf... i.e. it gets noticed. By you for example.

    Also, more practically, it keeps the top of the can clean and ready for drinking.


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    It's a simple sales tactic.

    It's to make people think it's a 'special' drink with a fancy can and a shltty piece of paper on top to make people think "Oh wow, look at that, it looks so special and I want to spend my money on it," and "Oh you can only get it in can form, that makes it look special/classy and I want to spend money on it." Also, if people want to drink a lot of it they can only buy it in can form (which is low value, thus high profit for the company).

    In reality it's low quality shlt that comes in fancy packaging, sold at a high price and only in the smallest, most expensive (and most profitable/biggest rip-off) form - cans.
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    I was really hoping there was going to be a terrible punchline - possibly involving a pun. I am disappointed.
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    It's a simple sales tactic.

    It's to make people think it's a 'special' drink with a fancy can and a shltty piece of paper on top to make people think "Oh wow, look at that, it looks so special and I want to spend my money on it," and "Oh you can only get it in can form, that makes it look special/classy and I want to spend money on it." Also, if people want to drink a lot of it they can only buy it in can form (which is low value, thus high profit for the company).

    In reality it's low quality shlt that comes in fancy packaging, sold at a high price and only in the smallest, most expensive (and most profitable/biggest rip-off) form - cans.
    Hmm, I'm not sure if cans are more profitable. Aluminium is a much more expensive material than plastic. It's always noticeable that PET bottles of a similar size/drink are more expensive than the cans.

    BTW OP, don't try the Chinotto flavour. Bleugh...
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    I assume just to make them look fancy. I tried one once, and while drinking it looked at the sugar content... never again.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Hmm, I'm not sure if cans are more profitable. Aluminium is a much more expensive material than plastic. It's always noticeable that PET bottles of a similar size/drink are more expensive than the cans.

    I'll bet the profit outweighs the extra money spent on the can - 330ml can be sold more expensively than, say, 500ml or 2 litres and the extra money from the cans more than covers the difference in the cost of the materials.
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    (Original post by BasingstokeBoy)
    I assume just to make them look fancy. I tried one once, and while drinking it looked at the sugar content... never again.
    Well they are on a par with Orangina, Fanta and Coke.

    In mainland Europe they do have more juice though. 20% vs 18% in UK...
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    Wow
    Never heard of them
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Well they are on a par with Orangina, Fanta and Coke.

    In mainland Europe they do have more juice though. 20% vs 18% in UK...
    I wouldn't put Orangina together with Fanta and Coke. Orangina at least tastes like it's mostly juice with a bit of sugary fizzy water. Back in my day, you could only get Orangina in glass bottles (which had a pretty cool shape) and you could pretty much only get it in mainland Europe. You can get it in the UK now in plastic bottles but it's not as good :moon:
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    I wouldn't put Orangina together with Fanta and Coke. Orangina at least tastes like it's mostly juice with a bit of sugary fizzy water. Back in my day, you could only get Orangina in glass bottles (which had a pretty cool shape) and you could pretty much only get it in mainland Europe. You can get it in the UK now in plastic bottles but it's not as good :moon:
    Yes I know - but the sugar content is (surprisingly to many) similar.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yes I know - but the sugar content is (surprisingly to many) similar.
    True, that was quite surprising when I found out. Even the low calorie version has quite a lot of sugar. I do wonder, though, how much of that sugar comes from the juice rather than additions in the factory.
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    True, that was quite surprising when I found out. Even the low calorie version has quite a lot of sugar. I do wonder, though, how much of that sugar comes from the juice rather than additions in the factory.
    Yep, lots of sugar in natural juice. Just look at the sugar levels in innocent, etc. Still yummy though... Just in moderation though.
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    How is Sicilian lemonade better than normal lemonade? Why is some lemonade non-fizzy?
 
 
 
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