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    I don't really think about high school very much now, I concentrate on the future mainly. But today I ran into some boys I went to highschool with, and it was pretty obvious they hadn't changed at all. They were just hanging around metro stops, setting fire to things to see if they exploded. I honestly don't think anything goes through their brain, like quite seriously I think it's mostly blankness, until they get distracted by something shiny like a knife. 19 year olds with the personal development of a twig. You could see the bleakness in their eyes. It was just, dumb, dumb stuff. And it really woke me up. I'm really spectacularly lucky to have escaped that school more or less unscathed. And I don't mean physically. I've been able to go walk away from that and do things like get offers from really good universities,. All of a sudden I'm just so grateful for the gift of stimulated thought, culture, understanding of other people etc. Because 97% of people who leave that school are in dire nothingness. It's like another planet.

    [/random thoughts]
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    It isn't 97% of your school, it's 97% of the country.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    I don't really think about high school very much now, I concentrate on the future mainly. But today I ran into some boys I went to highschool with, and it was pretty obvious they hadn't changed at all. They were just hanging around metro stops, setting fire to things to see if they exploded. I honestly don't think anything goes through their brain, like quite seriously I think it's mostly blankness, until they get distracted by something shiny like a knife. 19 year olds with the personal development of a twig. You could see the bleakness in their eyes. It was just, dumb, dumb stuff. And it really woke me up. I'm really spectacularly lucky to have escaped that school more or less unscathed. And I don't mean physically. I've been able to go walk away from that and do things like get offers from really good universities,. All of a sudden I'm just so grateful for the gift of stimulated thought, culture, understanding of other people etc. Because 97% of people who leave that school are in dire nothingness. It's like another planet.

    [/random thoughts]
    Yes, education is wonderfull
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    It isn't 97% of your school, it's 97% of the country.
    Perhaps. maybe it's a reminder that we all live in little worlds/cliques that actually end up quite separate from each other. Refreshing to see outside it.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Perhaps. maybe it's a reminder that we all live in little worlds/cliques that actually end up quite separate from each other. Refreshing to see outside it.

    yes, you and another few hundred thousand people going to university
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    (Original post by Investmentboy)
    Yes, education is wonderfull
    \m/
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Perhaps. maybe it's a reminder that we all live in little worlds/cliques that actually end up quite separate from each other. Refreshing to see outside it.
    I've never associated myself with any cliche, and have always analysed other peoples behaviour, when really i should have been learning some french before my french exam, it could have helped.
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    What school was that? Most people from my school did alright, that I've seen, we play football every week. My mates from a Catholic school failed their GCSE's and are now full time pot heads. They were amazed that I got what I did for GCSE and went to college and so on. I told them they could do anything too, they just had to want to do it. Like, for 6 months before my GCSE's I stopped drinking (before that I was drunk every night of the week by 4pm) but my mates didn't and now they have jobs that aren't as good as what they could be doing and two have babies to look after. They do have more...not common sense but...kind of practical, worldly knowledge than me, I'll give them that.
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    I've never associated myself with any cliche, and have always analysed other peoples behaviour, when really i should have been learning some french before my french exam, it could have helped.
    zuh?
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    Congrats!!!! Glad someone understands the real importance of life
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    (Original post by Knight-Errant)
    What school was that? Most people from my school did alright, that I've seen, we play football every week. My mates from a Catholic school failed their GCSE's and are now full time pot heads. They were amazed that I got what I did for GCSE and went to college and so on. I told them they could do anything too, they just had to want to do it. Like, for 6 months before my GCSE's I stopped drinking (before that I was drunk every night of the week by 4pm) but my mates didn't and now they have jobs that aren't as good as what they could be doing and two have babies to look after. They do have more...not common sense but...kind of practical, worldly knowledge than me, I'll give them that.
    Congrats. Sounds like you appreciate the same things I do. With regard to that last sentence, it's true that people in academic hothouses can often lack common sense/worldly knowledge, but the people I bumped into today didn't even have that.
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    Whats quite ironic is that I went to Ducie, which is perhaps the roughest school in Manchester before it was closed down. It had 10% GCSE pass rate at 5 A*-Cs but the people I have seen from there since I have left school all seem to have decent jobs or are doing degrees now.

    I suppose its because I go into a lot of the student clubs so I am only likely to meet up with the student ones. I am hardly like;ly to meet the ones in prison I guess.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Whats quite ironic is that I went to Ducie, which is perhaps the roughest school in Manchester before it was closed down. It had 10% GCSE pass rate at 5 A*-Cs but the people I have seen from there since I have left school all seem to have decent jobs or are doing degrees now.

    I suppose its because I go into a lot of the student clubs so I am only likely to meet up with the student ones. I am hardly like;ly to meet the ones in prison I guess.
    Right. THat's really exactly it. I was quite deluded about how bad my school was because the ones I was in touch with were those who came to college with me, or the ones I was friends with back then. It's not until you bump into the ones who are in and out of prison that you realise "jesus christ the majority of people who left school with me are like this."
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Right. THat's really exactly it. I was quite deluded about how bad my school was because the ones I was in touch with were those who came to college with me, or the ones I was friends with back then. It's not until you bump into the ones who are in and out of prison that you realise "jesus christ the majority of people who left school with me are like this."
    I guess there is low attainment in a lot of Greater Manchester schools, my sister goes to a state grammer school and its like another world, 360 average UCAS points, 95% GCSE 5 A-C pass rate etc. Yet its only 4 miles from the school I went to.

    I still see 30 year olds behaving really badly like firebugs and it really makes me wonder how they ended up that badly.
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    There's nothing wrong with expressing an appreciation of the opportunities you've been given! I'm so glad I got the chance to go to the secondary school I did because it meant an escape from the rough neighbourhood and typical kind of behaviour going on round there. If I hadn't I doubt I'd be heading off to uni now, and I might have ended up like one of my old schoolmates who got pregnant at 13 and doesn't exactly have the easiest time of it Maybe I'm gonna sound snobby now but it was a narrow escape from becoming a townie lol
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    Woah it seems that some of the schools people have been to are quite rough.... here most schools are the same.... and we certainly have very little violence.

    It's nice to here about other countries
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Woah it seems that some of the schools people have been to are quite rough.... here most schools are the same.... and we certainly have very little violence.
    Another thing we can blame the British government for
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    Another thing we can blame the British government for
    I am not sure if its the governments fualt though. If you have a school in a rough area then there isn't much that can be done. I read a recent report about boys that are cuddeled and and trateded gently as a kid go onto get much better jobs than those that were taught to be tough.
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    Another thing we can blame the British government for
    But you see, your schools are free.

    I pay 700 pounds a month per child for my school.... which is crippling. So people actually take school really seriously, we can't afford to fail or get kicked out.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I am not sure if its the governments fualt though. If you have a school in a rough area then there isn't much that can be done. I read a recent report about boys that are cuddeled and and trateded gently as a kid go onto get much better jobs than those that were taught to be tough.
    Yeah I wasn't being all that serious. Sometimes there's a spiral effect where a school with a bad rep continues to become less popular until its classed as failing...it affects the pupils, teachers and parents' morale and there's not much that can be done from outside to change its image.
    Pity the kids that are taught to be tough! If they're not disciplined I guess there's not much hope for them to have as much self-motivation and desire to achieve than those with a more nurturing upbringing.
 
 
 
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