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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    But you see, your schools are free.

    I pay 700 pounds a month per child for my school.... which is crippling. So people actually take school really seriously, we can't afford to fail or get kicked out.
    There is a big divide between the free state schools and fee-paying private ones in this country - I've experienced both and they were classic examples! The fact that I felt privileged to go to a private school encouraged me all the more to work harder, more than if I had been given no choice in the kind of school I went to.
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    There is a big divide between the free state schools and fee-paying private ones in this country - I've experienced both and they were classic examples! The fact that I felt privileged to go to a private school encouraged me all the more to work harder, more than if I had been given no choice in the kind of school I went to.
    Yeh... perhaps the fact that we need to pay encourages people to behave better.

    However, there would be lots of people who didn't go to school if the UK were to start charging for education. I don't know how it works in my country, I guess it's people's attitudes towards education.... the only way to escape poverty.
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    Hm my post was deleted. Fair enough. Whoever deleted it, would you care to IM me to let me know what I did wrong? I'm guessing it was the swearing.

    Sorry.

    lex.

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    A number of posts have been removed from this thread so that discussions regarding the thread starters' topic can been seen to be the main discussion point, rather than a petty squabble.

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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Yeh... perhaps the fact that we need to pay encourages people to behave better.

    However, there would be lots of people who didn't go to school if the UK were to start charging for education. I don't know how it works in my country, I guess it's people's attitudes towards education.... the only way to escape poverty.
    I get the feeling that a lot more people in Britain take school education for granted - for many its just something that has to be got through until they reach 16 and are able to leave, but not necessarily so they can get a job! It is possible to waste all your schoolyears and go straight onto benefits here, which I guess is a factor in the lack of interest. In other words getting qualifications doesn't feel compulsory, although our government is trying to change that.
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    I get the feeling that a lot more people in Britain take school education for granted - for many its just something that has to be got through until they reach 16 and are able to leave, but not necessarily so they can get a job! It is possible to waste all your schoolyears and go straight onto benefits here, which I guess is a factor in the lack of interest. In other words getting qualifications doesn't feel compulsory, although our government is trying to change that.
    Yeh I see the problems with such a system.. but here it's quite the opposite. We get people who are super smart, but struggle to go to even secondary school coz' of finances. University is an even bigger problem... and I feel horrible when I can afford the 20,000 pounds p.a. to go to the UK but my friends who have 5As can't get into any Uni just coz' of money - that is the ultimate happiness-destroyer.
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    The problem is for many young people at 16 qualifications don't matter. They feel like society has rejected them and they will never do well.

    At my school people were more bothered about becoming ganstas than going to university. In fact university wasn't even considered an option for most of us.
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    People don't see how important school is. My cousin is only 15 (this month) and he's already a pot head who never goes to school. That's the area where I live. I tell him to stay in school and drag him home when he's out all the time but he doesn't listen. I think a lot of people are just rebellious (not going to school, setting fires etc) to be noticed or something and then they regret it when they grow up.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    The problem is for many young people at 16 qualifications don't matter. They feel like society has rejected them and they will never do well.

    At my school people were more bothered about becoming ganstas than going to university. In fact university wasn't even considered an option for most of us.
    There is often a vicious cycle..... I can see myself feeling exactly the same way if I were in a situation where my peers weren't doing well and there seemed to be little hope of me ever achieving. We on UKL are the privileged few....
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    They feel like society has rejected them and they will never do well.
    The case of one of my brothers. No matter where he's got in life he always sees his GCSE grades as depicting him as thick.

    Oh yeah and I'd wish people wouldn't judge people by exam grades, intelligence is immeasurable (is that even a word? lol).
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    I went to a local college where the teaching was so poor that people were just built to fail. I think in order for people to want to go onto further education after year eleven builds upon the way the teachers deliever the information needed to be covered to generate student sucess. The teachers in our college didnt seem to have any passion in their delivery which just enabled people in my classes to mess around. I would say that student are partly to blame for this but other factors such as accessability and teaching are also to blame.
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    (Original post by me!)

    The case of one of my brothers. No matter where he's got in life he always sees his GCSE grades as depicting him as thick.

    Oh yeah and I'd wish people wouldn't judge people by exam grades, intelligence is immeasurable (is that even a word? lol).
    Thats a shame, as he there could be so many reasons he did badly in his GCSEs. Has he given up on education altogether then?
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    (Original post by Knight-Errant)
    People don't see how important school is. My cousin is only 15 (this month) and he's already a pot head who never goes to school. That's the area where I live. I tell him to stay in school and drag him home when he's out all the time but he doesn't listen. I think a lot of people are just rebellious (not going to school, setting fires etc) to be noticed or something and then they regret it when they grow up.
    I know people like that and have friends like that, sad thing is they are seriously clever and really could do anything they put their mind to.
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    When I go to the UK, I'd actually like to see some of these schools for myself. The way they're depicted here seems quite frightful.... I think it'd be a good experience...
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    I've been called a swot and a snob for wanting to go to uni from those who dropped out of school early...to these people doing well is seen as something to be ashamed of because it doesn't fit in with their plans
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    When I go to the UK, I'd actually like to see some of these schools for myself. The way they're depicted here seems quite frightful.... I think it'd be a good experience...
    You won't be able to get any where near one (high security) but the best thing you can do is catch a bus near a rough school at home time. You will get an insight to some of the problems.

    It wasn;t that bad, but one of my peers was shot dead a couple of years ago when he was just 19.
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    (Original post by pikaboo)
    I've been called a swot and a snob for wanting to go to uni from those who dropped out of school early...to these people doing well is seen as something to be ashamed of because it doesn't fit in with their plans
    I got told by my joiner mate (left school at 16 with hardly any GCSEs) that I was wasting my time at college.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    You won't be able to get any where near one (high security) but the best thing you can do is catch a bus near a rough school at home time. You will get an insight to some of the problems.

    It wasn;t that bad, but one of my peers was shot dead a couple of years ago when he was just 19.
    Oh goodness.... that is REALLY tragic... I feel quite lucky to be in a country where we've never heard of gun crime, and kids walk about everywhere alone..... even a robbery is 'big news' that happens infrequently.

    Nevertheless, I'll try go past one of these schools.... accompanied by some more familiar people.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    It wasn;t that bad, but one of my peers was shot dead a couple of years ago when he was just 19.
    Reminds me of the inner-city ghetto schools in America - we are seeing more student violence now though and a lack of respect in general towards teachers, I wonder if itsome schools will ever get as bad :\
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    (Original post by lilsunflower)
    Oh goodness.... that is REALLY tragic... I feel quite lucky to be in a country where we've never heard of gun crime, and kids walk about everywhere alone..... even a robbery is 'big news' that happens infrequently.

    Nevertheless, I'll try go past one of these schools.... accompanied by some more familiar people.
    So where are you from then that is so perfect?

    What happens to all the people who can't afford to go to school? Don't they go out and become armed robbers?
 
 
 
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