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    So here's the deal: I'm a Bio graduate from Aberystwyth University, which is the other side of the country from me. I LOVED my time there and I'm dying to go back.

    I've been pushed into teaching after I legit couldn't find anything to do with myself (can't you tell how enthusiastic I am?) and I've been given too choices.

    A PGCE at Aberystwyth University...or a SCITT with Essex training.

    Now, I've always been told that SCITT is to PGCE as a cupcake is to a wedding cake. All my past teachers and many tutors have told me to aim for a PGCE. It's the better, more prestigious qualification. It looks better, it takes you further and it's more built towards slowly getting into the classroom.

    However, the SCITT is what my family's pressing upon me. It's closer (no travel costs), cheaper AND I've been told you get paid. I've never really been bothered with money, but my Mum is... She's roaring at me to take the SCITT. But I'm intimidated by the thought of being dropped in the deep end into a classroom.

    Ideally? I want to teach A-Level/College level. That's where I'm at right now. But I understand that, to advance to further education, I should begin with secondary.

    What should I do? What are the benefits of a SCITT or PGCE? Is the lack of income from a PGCE excused by the prestige of the qualification?

    Please guys, I really need help with this one...
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    Please people, I really need some advice here :/
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    Beyond stating the obvious that you shouldn't be looking at going into teaching if you don't want to teach, all anyone can really recommend is to go with the one that 'feels' right for you.

    Both give you the same qualification at the end of it, the main difference is how you feel you'll cope best. A PGCE tends to ease you in more gently than a SCITT (however different providers will have different timetables, so some may well ease you in at the same rate as the PGCE traditionally does).

    Go and visit the university and lead school. Ask a million questions, See if you can volunteer in the lead school or partnership schools. See if you can talk to people that have done the course this year or previous years .

    Go with your gut feeling. Ultimately, it's going to be you doing the hard work, not your mum.
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    What are you being offered exactly? It sounds like you might be confusing a SCITT with Schools Direct (Salaried). A SCITT by definition will award QTS and, depending on the course, may offer a PGCE/PGDE (I'm on a SCITT course and it offers a PGDE). A SCITT by definition is not salaried - instead of having university lectures at the start of your course, you start off at a school but you wouldn't be expected to teach classes from day one. You would be gradually mentored and then take lessons. As part of a SCITT, you would go to different schools. Schools Direct (Salaried) awards QTS at the end of the course but you are teaching lessons from day one and you are paid a salary from day one. You only teach in one school. This is aimed more at people who have several years of work experience (most often in the education sector). A PGCE is the university-led course which then has the placements.

    If money is the issue, also consider the fact that you may be eligible for a subject bursary depending on your degree classification.


    Hope this clears things up a bit for you!
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    My understanding is the QTS is the important bit that allows you to teach and the PGCE is an academic qualification on teaching. All the SCITT providers I have had contact with offered a PGCE as part of the course.
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    There's a lot of confusion in your post.

    PGCEs are University based. You'll spend a few weeks in Uni, before doing your placements. You won't be paid for the whole year. These are usually self-funded or through student finance.

    SCITTS are independent providers who are usually accredited by Universities. You can obtain QTS-only (the minimum required to teach) or full PGCE (depends on your provider) SCITTS usually start in placements from September with one day a week at University. You will not be paid for the whole year. These are usually self-funded or through student finance.

    School Direct is another provider which offers salaried positions to some subjects. These obviously fill up fast and the subjects choices and locations are limited.

    It really depends what you want and how committed you are. It's a hard year, if you're only doing it because there's no other options (bad choice to get into teaching...) opt for QTS-only courses. This will provide you with the minimum requirement to teach, and you have the option to complete a top-up course at a later date to achieve PGCE status.

    If you want the challenge, opt for a PGCE course. It has a few extra essays and will award you with some MA level credits. PGCE will enable you to teach internationally as well.

    Money-wise, you can apply for a bursary which increases depending on subject and degree grade. Again, not every subject is eligible.
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    Hey guys, thanks for the replies. This REALLY helped!

    So an SCITT is NOT salaried at all?

    (Original post by Findlay6)

    SCITTS are independent providers who are usually accredited by Universities. You can obtain QTS-only (the minimum required to teach) or full PGCE (depends on your provider) SCITTS usually start in placements from September with one day a week at University. You will not be paid for the whole year. These are usually self-funded or through student finance.
    School Direct courses are salaried but, as someone with no teaching experience, I am basically guaranteed not to get a School Direct program? And, as someone who's a bit wary and intimidated by the thought of teaching, would you guys recommend a PGCE over an SCITT?
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    As Findlay6 has pointed out, you can do a SCITT course with a PGCE. The PGCE is an academic qualification that lots of training providers offer; a SCITT is simply a training provider, just like a university is also a training provider. Like universities, some SCITTs offer PGCEs and salaried School Direct courses. Every SCITT will run their course differently, but generally their courses involve being in school more than a university-based course. This does not necessary mean that you would receive less support with your teaching than a university course. You should need to talk to the course providers to found out what the structure of their course is like and the level of support you would receive.

    You should try to get some teaching experience before applying. It's not really possible to gauge accurately if teaching is the right career for you without some experience of what the job is like and most course providers expect at least a few days experience. It's better than you try and address your wariness about teaching now than when you're training because no matter which route you choose, you will find yourself teaching classes very quickly! Salaried School Direct courses are competitive - you need to have three years of work experience (in any industry) in order to be able to apply.
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    (Original post by TipTree)
    Hey guys, thanks for the replies. This REALLY helped!

    So an SCITT is NOT salaried at all?

    School Direct courses are salaried but, as someone with no teaching experience, I am basically guaranteed not to get a School Direct program? And, as someone who's a bit wary and intimidated by the thought of teaching, would you guys recommend a PGCE over an SCITT?
    Some SCITTs will offer salaried but many mature students with mortgages/children apply for those places so it's very competitive (and they require a minimum of 3y work experience in any field).

    To apply for any teacher training course you're required to have a minimum of 10 days in a school. This can be voluntary or paid (Teaching Assistant/Cover Supervisor/Supply Teacher).

    It really depends what you prefer.

    Eg; I'm 25 and already have a MA and currently work as a cover teacher. I have no desire to go back to Uni and take time out. I chose a SCITT so I could go straight back into school in September and get stuck in again.. Whereas you may want that university lifestyle and atmosphere and a slower transition.
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    (Original post by Findlay6)
    Some SCITTs will offer salaried but many mature students with mortgages/children apply for those places so it's very competitive (and they require a minimum of 3y work experience in any field).

    To apply for any teacher training course you're required to have a minimum of 10 days in a school. This can be voluntary or paid (Teaching Assistant/Cover Supervisor/Supply Teacher).

    It really depends what you prefer.

    Eg; I'm 25 and already have a MA and currently work as a cover teacher. I have no desire to go back to Uni and take time out. I chose a SCITT so I could go straight back into school in September and get stuck in again.. Whereas you may want that university lifestyle and atmosphere and a slower transition.
    I have been completely unable to find voluntary work in schools for two reason: 1) I work quite heavy hours, 2) I've been denied 4 positions already and I've basically given up.

    Currently, I work a job at £10 an hour and I enjoy it, but the potential for promotion is limited. My parents are trying to push me towards a career but...even if teaching is more profitable, it's a LOT of work...
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    (Original post by TipTree)
    So here's the deal: I'm a Bio graduate from Aberystwyth University, which is the other side of the country from me. I LOVED my time there and I'm dying to go back.

    I've been pushed into teaching after I legit couldn't find anything to do with myself (can't you tell how enthusiastic I am?) and I've been given too choices.

    A PGCE at Aberystwyth University...or a SCITT with Essex training.

    Now, I've always been told that SCITT is to PGCE as a cupcake is to a wedding cake. All my past teachers and many tutors have told me to aim for a PGCE. It's the better, more prestigious qualification. It looks better, it takes you further and it's more built towards slowly getting into the classroom.

    However, the SCITT is what my family's pressing upon me. It's closer (no travel costs), cheaper AND I've been told you get paid. I've never really been bothered with money, but my Mum is... She's roaring at me to take the SCITT. But I'm intimidated by the thought of being dropped in the deep end into a classroom.

    Ideally? I want to teach A-Level/College level. That's where I'm at right now. But I understand that, to advance to further education, I should begin with secondary.

    What should I do? What are the benefits of a SCITT or PGCE? Is the lack of income from a PGCE excused by the prestige of the qualification?

    Please guys, I really need help with this one...
    Sorry, I don't have much imput, but can't you get a PGCE through Teach First as you get a teachers training salary for 2 years through them £22k - 27k?
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    (Original post by TipTree)
    I have been completely unable to find voluntary work in schools for two reason: 1) I work quite heavy hours, 2) I've been denied 4 positions already and I've basically given up.

    Currently, I work a job at £10 an hour and I enjoy it, but the potential for promotion is limited. My parents are trying to push me towards a career but...even if teaching is more profitable, it's a LOT of work...
    It's currently exam season. Wait a few weeks until the GCSEs/Alevels are finished and schools are a little less tense and you should be able to get some voluntary work.
    You won't be accepted onto a course without experience. Full stop. You will be expected to acquire some.
    The governments 'School Experience Programme' may help
    https://getintoteaching.education.go...ool-experience

    Yeah, if you read around people will admit hat a PGCE is the hardest year of your life. You're working full time, often commuting 1h+, dealing with students, marking work, planning lessons, preparing observations, teaching yourself content, paperwork, essays etc. If you're not used to working hard, you'll struggle. (Imagine doing your degree and working full time)

    You're over 21, an adult. Who cares what your parents want - What do you want? Make your own independent choices. I'd strongly advise you to reconsider teaching if it's not something you really want right now.
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    (Original post by Findlay6)
    It's currently exam season. Wait a few weeks until the GCSEs/Alevels are finished and schools are a little less tense and you should be able to get some voluntary work.
    You won't be accepted onto a course without experience. Full stop. You will be expected to acquire some.
    The governments 'School Experience Programme' may help
    https://getintoteaching.education.go...ool-experience

    Yeah, if you read around people will admit hat a PGCE is the hardest year of your life. You're working full time, often commuting 1h+, dealing with students, marking work, planning lessons, preparing observations, teaching yourself content, paperwork, essays etc. If you're not used to working hard, you'll struggle. (Imagine doing your degree and working full time)

    You're over 21, an adult. Who cares what your parents want - What do you want? Make your own independent choices. I'd strongly advise you to reconsider teaching if it's not something you really want right now.
    I wish it were that easy. I'm not strong-willed enough to know or stand up for what I want.

    I could see myself teaching A-level, teaching students that have chosen biology and want to learn. Working with them as peers and helping them understand advanced topics.

    But trying to discipline a bunch of kids on their phones, who are only in biology because they HAVE to do it? No, that's not me at all... I've got a lot of thinking to do. But thanks for your advice!
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    (Original post by TipTree)
    I wish it were that easy. I'm not strong-willed enough to know or stand up for what I want.

    I could see myself teaching A-level, teaching students that have chosen biology and want to learn. Working with them as peers and helping them understand advanced topics.

    But trying to discipline a bunch of kids on their phones, who are only in biology because they HAVE to do it? No, that's not me at all... I've got a lot of thinking to do. But thanks for your advice!
    If Biology is your subject you won't be able to limit yourself to A-Levels unless you work in a college. In secondary you'd be expected to teach all 3 sciences from KS3 - KS5 with Biology being your specialism for A-Level.

    All teachers dream of having perfect students. PGCEs will teach you behavioural techniques and if you can make lessons fun and engaging, and treat them like young adults you get a lot of out of them. some teachers I've worked with like to use fear to get good behaviour and it backfires.
 
 
 
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