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    Hello

    Here in my textbook it says the tertiary halo alkene react faster than secondary which react faster than primary.

    But it also says, that this is because for tertiary it is a two step reaction and primary is a 1 step reaction. This doesn't really make sense to me as it just explains nucleophillic substitution. So the primary alcohol should also be made via two step reaction (as that's what happens in the mechanism) . Do you understand my confusion?

    It also says that the increased reactivity is explained by the stability of the tertiary halaolkanes.
    But doesn't the stability mean it's exactly that-stable. So shouldn't it take longer to react?

    Can someone please explain the following or perhaps anything I've misinterpreted.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Questioness)
    Hello

    Here in my textbook it says the tertiary halo alkene react faster than secondary which react faster than primary.

    But it also says, that this is because for tertiary it is a two step reaction and primary is a 1 step reaction. This doesn't really make sense to me as it just explains nucleophillic substitution. So the primary alcohol should also be made via two step reaction (as that's what happens in the mechanism) . Do you understand my confusion?

    It also says that the increased reactivity is explained by the stability of the tertiary halaolkanes.
    But doesn't the stability mean it's exactly that-stable. So shouldn't it take longer to react?

    Can someone please explain the following or perhaps anything I've misinterpreted.

    Thanks
    Hey,
    Tertiary carbocations are more stable than primary or secondary and so they are able to go by a two step mechanism as after the first step when the leaving group is removed, you're left with the carbocations, but then the next step is when a nucleophile will attack it.
    Primary and secondary usually go by a 1 step mechanism as the carbocation is not stable so the reaction goes by avoiding making the carbocation.
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    (Original post by mikeymk)
    Hey,
    Tertiary carbocations are more stable than primary or secondary and so they are able to go by a two step mechanism as after the first step when the leaving group is removed, you're left with the carbocations, but then the next step is when a nucleophile will attack it.
    Primary and secondary usually go by a 1 step mechanism as the carbocation is not stable so the reaction goes by avoiding making the carbocation.
    Oh right! Thank you .
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    (Original post by Questioness)
    Oh right! Thank you .
    No problem, happy to help
 
 
 
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