Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,

    Wonder if anyone could share an example of teaching techniques they have used to make their lessons exciting and engage their class?

    Thanks
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    It isn't really a technique. You just have to make sure the kids are excited to learn. Be passionate about your subject. Get them doing practical stuff rather than drone at them for 50 minutes.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Yes - the less talk the better, funnily enough.

    I try to start my lessons with a question, an image, a video clip, the room arranged differently, a matching game on the tables all ready for them to play with as soon as they come in...something to get them thinking/engaged from the off. Then when you do want to talk to them, they are more willing to listen.

    Keep the activities varied as well as try to strike a balance between giving them enough time to do them and not TOO much time otherwise they will feel there is no urgency to complete the task and will dawdle. On Fridays I bring out soft ball toys that are shaped like different animals and chuck them at the kids to get answers rather than having them raise their hands...just to keep them on their toes

    Plus, don't teach anything that YOU personally can't get excited about. If you can't then as sure as hell the kids won't.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Kahoot quizzes.

    They use their phones of computers to answer questions on the board. points are award the faster you answer. It can get quite competitive and gets them using technology in the classroom - even if it is their phone. At least you know that if they're playing Kahoot, they're not on Snapchat...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angelil)

    Plus, don't teach anything that YOU personally can't get excited about. If you can't then as sure as hell the kids won't.
    This part is cute, but personally I just can't get excited about teaching kids how to write compound and complex sentences.

    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    This part is cute, but personally I just can't get excited about teaching kids how to write compound and complex sentences.

    Then you need to find a way...if it's part of the curriculum and you have to teach it, then you need to make it happen for them. If they don't engage with it (or at least understand it) then you've just wasted an hour...it is worth the effort.

    (For what it's worth, in the example of compound and complex sentences, my 14/15-year-old students have always had a real giggle in the past by having parts of sentences written on differently-coloured cards [green for main clauses and red for subordinate clauses] and mixing and matching them to make different sentences - sometimes resulting in quite innuendo-laced sentences! You can do it )
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angelil)
    (For what it's worth, in the example of compound and complex sentences, my 14/15-year-old students have always had a real giggle in the past by having parts of sentences written on differently-coloured cards [green for main clauses and red for subordinate clauses] and mixing and matching them to make different sentences - sometimes resulting in quite innuendo-laced sentences! You can do it )
    This works well in primary, too. I've done it for subordinate clauses, cause conjunctions (cause one colour, conjunction another and effect a third colour) etc. They love having a wander around the room and trying to find people to match up with to make sentences.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Not every lesson needs to be exciting.

    If some lessons are exciting, you'll have the pupils on side and willing to work when the content itself is pretty boring. If you can create the right atmosphere and attitude, the rest will follow.

    Things that are important (in my opinion):
    -Something to do from the word go. I see so many lessons where the teacher waffles on about the objectives and what they did last lesson and in that time the pupils start to get off task before the starter activity is already set. Have a clear and simple starter that everyone can access with minimal explanations and the tone is set.
    -Variety and pace - this doesn't mean moving on before pupils have the chance to fully grasp something. It mean practising things in different ways and via different activities so they feel they're doing something different even when they're not.
    -The odd gimmicky thing to get them on side. Kahoot quizzes (as someone else has mentioned) are awesome. I also love reading relays (each pair/three gets a fairly challenging text/source to read. They then get Q1 on a small slip of paper. They have to run and bring you the correct answer to Q1 in order to be given Q2 and so on) - great fun but reinforces high expectations as they can't move on until they've got the previous question right.


    Breaking things up with fast-paced activities in general helps to create a good "buzz" in the room. This could include:
    -Kahoot
    -Mini-whiteboard activities
    -Random name generators
    -Games like "beat the teacher", "give or keep the points", "blind noughts and crosses" - I can explain these if needed.

    But I still think it's important not to fall into the trap of doing these all the time and neglecting the things that are hard and can be boring. And they sometimes need slower paced, simple tasks to allow them to consolidate and think - if everything is manic and fast paced they'll lose the plot. The key is to find a balance which keeps pupils on side and willing.

    I can do really dull and badly planned lessons with my Y10s on occasion (especially Friday P6 after we've had parents' evening the previous day) and they still get on with it really well because of the relationship we've got and because they trust and respect me.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.