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    Grade exams are very popular in Music (Grade 1-8 performance / theory, then diplomas). I think Drama also has grade exams. Every pupil works through the grade system at his or her own pace (you can skip grades if you are a fast learner, or take more time per grade if you are a slow learner) and everyone exits it at different stages according to ability or interest.

    How about grade exams in Maths or French? You would probably need to abolish classes based on age, and rather set them by stage of learning, but that may not be a bad thing.

    Actually, in French something similar already exists but is not used in schools - the CEFR exams.
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    (Original post by llys)
    Grade exams are very popular in Music (Grade 1-8 performance / theory, then diplomas). I think Drama also has grade exams. Every pupil works through the grade system at his or her own pace (you can skip grades if you are a fast learner, or take more time per grade if you are a slow learner) and everyone exits it at different stages according to ability or interest.

    How about grade exams in Maths or French? You would probably need to abolish classes based on age, and rather set them by stage of learning, but that may not be a bad thing.

    Actually, in French something similar already exists but is not used in schools - the CEFR exams.
    Good for some subjects.
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    (Original post by ckfeister)
    Good for some subjects.
    Yes, I imagine it would work particularly well for "accumulative" practical subjects.

    For example, in Music, at Grade 8 you will still use ALL the skills you learned at Grade 1. The same would be true in foreign languages - but it is not necessarily the case in native English (depends how you structure the curriculum) and most probably not possible in History or Geography or other subjects which are heavily based on topical knowledge rather than practical use.

    I think it could work in Maths, Computing and the Sciences though, if you restructure them a bit.
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    (Original post by llys)
    Yes, I imagine it would work particularly well for "accumulative" practical subjects.

    For example, in Music, at Grade 8 you will still use ALL the skills you learned at Grade 1. The same would be true in foreign languages - but it is not necessarily the case in native English (depends how you structure the curriculum) and most probably not possible in History or Geography or other subjects which are heavily based on topical knowledge rather than practical use.

    I think it could work in Maths, Computing and the Sciences though, if you restructure them a bit.
    Agreed.
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    Music tends to be taught one-to-one so a grading system works really well. But how on earth would a teacher plan a lesson for 30 mixed ability kids on a grade system?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Music tends to be taught one-to-one so a grading system works really well. But how on earth would a teacher plan a lesson for 30 mixed ability kids on a grade system?
    They wouldn't, of course. Classes would be set by grade rather than by age.
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    (Original post by llys)
    They wouldn't, of course. Classes would be set by grade rather than by age.
    Ok. I still don't think it would work practically. If you were a low ability 16 year old, how would you feel seeing Y7 kids overtaking you?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Ok. I still don't think it would work practically. If you were a low ability 16 year old, how would you feel seeing Y7 kids overtaking you?
    Yes, that could be quite awkward. On the other hand you may really excel at other subjects. I think it's OK to accept that everyone has strengths and weaknesses.
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    (Original post by llys)
    Yes, that could be quite awkward. On the other hand you may really excel at other subjects. I think it's OK to accept that everyone has strengths and weaknesses.
    Agreed. Hence streaming classes in some cases. Under your method a whole school would have to take one subject class at a time requiring teachers either to be multi-disciplinary or have 10 times as many teachers.
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Agreed. Hence streaming classes in some cases. Under your method a whole school would have to take one subject class at a time requiring teachers either to be multi-disciplinary or have 10 times as many teachers.
    I don't think so? You just sort kids into classes based on their grade level rather than age for each subject. If the school is large enough, you can have the same number of kids per class, and hence the same number of teachers.

    The timetable for pupils would also stay pretty much the same, only that they will share different classes with different pupils.

    Edit: I can see your point for small schools though.
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    Not considering grade system because it can't differentiate between the two persons.
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    (Original post by llys)
    They wouldn't, of course. Classes would be set by grade rather than by age.
    Catch is timetabling

    . Given students come from different years re this structure, all would possibly need the same periods for music so they could attend their appropriate ability group. This means the school needs multiple music rooms (and instruments) and multiple teachers all in attendance at the same time and all twiddling their very flexible thumbs (if piano players) the rest of the time.

    It is a good idea but trying to accommodate the timetabling across say a whole secondary would be a nightmare.
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    It would be awkward if everyone is working towards a "grade" instead of the actual skills required. Also, it would be difficult to teach in groups if the same-age children all have different grades.
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    Catch is timetabling

    . Given students come from different years re this structure, all would possibly need the same periods for music so they could attend their appropriate ability group. This means the school needs multiple music rooms (and instruments) and multiple teachers all in attendance at the same time and all twiddling their very flexible thumbs (if piano players) the rest of the time.

    It is a good idea but trying to accommodate the timetabling across say a whole secondary would be a nightmare.
    Yes, like the other poster said - I guess it would only work in large enough schools. Pity.
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    (Original post by ellen_419)
    It would be awkward if everyone is working towards a "grade" instead of the actual skills required.
    Aha, like kids who only practise their pieces, but can't really play anything else? This can happen in music, but that's because of how the exam is set up. If there was more focus on sight-reading (unseen pieces) than prepared pieces, for example, this would not happen, because people who only practise their performance pieces would not pass the exam any more.
 
 
 
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