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    I'm almost fluent in spanish (I'm half spanish) and I was thinking of studying a BA in psychology for all 4 years in either the universidad autonoma de madrid or universidad complutense madrid, instead of studying in the university of bath or exeter. Would my degree be just as reputable, and would it look good to do a degree in a foreign language? Has anyone ever studied at a spanish university and can tell me what it was like?
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    I haven't studied there but I am applying to study in September. I'm in a really similar situation because it's hard to know, all my Spanish family and family here have told me that Spain has brilliant universities and a great education system but the only problem is you might get slightly more employment opportunities after your degree. I think it would also be better to go there because showing that you can study in a different language shows that you have a high level of fluency in both languages and in general Spain is just a better life aha. Also many of cousins who have studied there have been able to come here without a problem to get a job with Spanish university degrees so I wouldn't say it matters too much.
    Have you started your application or done selectividad? I'm really unsure how our A Level grades are processed and stuff. Because they already have their grades they can apply but we have to wait until results day I think it's a bit confusing.
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    (Original post by ellenlaura15)
    I haven't studied there but I am applying to study in September. I'm in a really similar situation because it's hard to know, all my Spanish family and family here have told me that Spain has brilliant universities and a great education system but the only problem is you might get slightly more employment opportunities after your degree. I think it would also be better to go there because showing that you can study in a different language shows that you have a high level of fluency in both languages and in general Spain is just a better life aha. Also many of cousins who have studied there have been able to come here without a problem to get a job with Spanish university degrees so I wouldn't say it matters too much.
    Have you started your application or done selectividad? I'm really unsure how our A Level grades are processed and stuff. Because they already have their grades they can apply but we have to wait until results day I think it's a bit confusing.
    Hi, thanks for your reply! That's great - it seems like you're in the same situation as me. I'm taking a gap year as I've got a teaching assistant job, but I will be applying in the summer, so I will already have my a-levels. I got the impression from the websites that i didn't need to do la selectividad if i could show them my a-levels, is this true? I hope to study in Spain next september. I'm not sure when I should start doing my application. (I'm worried that I'll be really old though haha, as I'll be 20 when I start). I agree, it is confusing! But I like what you said about fluency and quality of life, I think I agree with you there. I would much rather live in spain than here. The only reason I can think of staying here is that russell groups may be more employable, but from what you've said that may not be the case.
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    (Original post by carmen333)
    Hi, thanks for your reply! That's great - it seems like you're in the same situation as me. I'm taking a gap year as I've got a teaching assistant job, but I will be applying in the summer, so I will already have my a-levels. I got the impression from the websites that i didn't need to do la selectividad if i could show them my a-levels, is this true? I hope to study in Spain next september. I'm not sure when I should start doing my application. (I'm worried that I'll be really old though haha, as I'll be 20 when I start). I agree, it is confusing! But I like what you said about fluency and quality of life, I think I agree with you there. I would much rather live in spain than here. The only reason I can think of staying here is that russell groups may be more employable, but from what you've said that may not be the case.

    Yeah you don´t have to do selectividad, I haven´t done it, the only thing it stops you doing is entering a degree with a nota de corte higher than 10, so for me it´s not a problem. The university life is really good over there aswell, it is slightly different but I don´t think we would miss out on anything. It might be a bit harder to settle in being far from home but i´m sure it´ll be fine and if not just reapply in England. They go to univeristy a bit younger there aswell some of my cousins were 17 when thehy started! But Madrid is so diverse theres loads of mature students. To be honest to me it seems like the better option aha
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    Hello, I'm considering studying in Spain too! Your advice was really helpful, I'm just wondering if you could explain the whole 'degree with a nota de corte higher than 10' thing, because I'm so confused about the whole process! I've read on the UNED website that you'd have to take part of the selectividad to get 4 additional points? I'm not entirely sure what that means though ahah
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    (Original post by giuly510)
    Hello, I'm considering studying in Spain too! Your advice was really helpful, I'm just wondering if you could explain the whole 'degree with a nota de corte higher than 10' thing, because I'm so confused about the whole process! I've read on the UNED website that you'd have to take part of the selectividad to get 4 additional points? I'm not entirely sure what that means though ahah
    Basically imagine you're a spanish student with bachillerato. You will get a mark between 0-10. However, a few degrees like medicine and dentistry and law require you to have a grade (nota) of more than 10 sometimes around 12.3 or 11.9 depending on the year. In order to improve your grade from say 9 to 11.9 you will take a specific selectividad exam in 3 subjects of your choice and providing you do well you should improve your grade to the required cut-off of the universities. For foreign students we receive a mark between 0-10 based on our current qualifications lets say Alevels. If we want to access those degrees which have a higher cut off (note de corte) we must take selectividad parte especifica with UNED which will improve our mark (hopefully)
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    (Original post by gcooney4)
    Basically imagine you're a spanish student with bachillerato. You will get a mark between 0-10. However, a few degrees like medicine and dentistry and law require you to have a grade (nota) of more than 10 sometimes around 12.3 or 11.9 depending on the year. In order to improve your grade from say 9 to 11.9 you will take a specific selectividad exam in 3 subjects of your choice and providing you do well you should improve your grade to the required cut-off of the universities. For foreign students we receive a mark between 0-10 based on our current qualifications lets say Alevels. If we want to access those degrees which have a higher cut off (note de corte) we must take selectividad parte especifica with UNED which will improve our mark (hopefully)
    Thank you so much! That makes complete sense. I've been looking for the notas de corte for law in uam and ucm and they all seem to be between 5-8, so that means I shouldn't have to do la selectividad if I do well in my A Levels right?
 
 
 
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