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    If I don't get into sixth form due to poor GCSE grades I will self teach myself A level maths, chemistry and physics. Does this sound good to you?

    I just want a challenge and that's what I love about A levels! The fact that you have to really think and put in a lot of effort in order to do well.

    So basically I really want to do A levels and plus what I want to do at uni requires those subjects. Now if for whatever reason I'm unable to get into sixth form because I achieved a 'C' as opposed to a grade 'B' in any subject does self teaching sound good? Has anyone who taught themselves A levels done exceptionally well?

    Also last question is how do you teach yourself? It is using a text book and internet isn't it and maybe a tutor, right?
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    If I don't get into sixth form due to poor GCSE grades I will self teach myself A level maths, chemistry and physics. Does this sound good to you?

    I just want a challenge and that's what I love about A levels! The fact that you have to really think and put in a lot of effort in order to do well.

    So basically I really want to do A levels and plus what I want to do at uni requires those subjects. Now if for whatever reason I'm unable to get into sixth form because I achieved a 'C' as opposed to a grade 'B' in any subject does self teaching sound good? Has anyone who taught themselves A levels done exceptionally well?

    Also last question is how do you teach yourself? It is using a text book and internet isn't it and maybe a tutor, right?
    If you get a C then you won't be able to except for maths because there are also practicals you must do for the other subjects which is impossible without the facilities of a college
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    (Original post by Xenon17)
    If you get a C then you won't be able to except for maths because there are also practicals you must do for the other subjects which is impossible without the facilities of a college
    Is there any sixth forms that allow a B in chemistry/physics at GCSE but a C in maths maybe
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    Is there any sixth forms that allow a B in chemistry/physics at GCSE but a C in maths maybe
    Probably not, to do physics at my sixth form you need an A in GCSE maths. A-level maths is also mandatory if you want to do physics as well.
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    Is there any sixth forms that allow a B in chemistry/physics at GCSE but a C in maths maybe
    yes search for them I can't do it for you and you should have already applied for college
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    (Original post by Xenon17)
    yes search for them I can't do it for you and you should have already applied for college
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    If I don't get into sixth form due to poor GCSE grades I will self teach myself A level maths, chemistry and physics. Does this sound good to you?

    I just want a challenge and that's what I love about A levels! The fact that you have to really think and put in a lot of effort in order to do well.

    So basically I really want to do A levels and plus what I want to do at uni requires those subjects. Now if for whatever reason I'm unable to get into sixth form because I achieved a 'C' as opposed to a grade 'B' in any subject does self teaching sound good? Has anyone who taught themselves A levels done exceptionally well?

    Also last question is how do you teach yourself? It is using a text book and internet isn't it and maybe a tutor, right?
    It's definitely best do to the subjects you want , you may be able to speak to a sixth form, if not self teaching is still what you will do anyways if you want good grades at A level. The only worry I would have would be that you would either get caught up in something else as oppose to studying A levels or the fees to take the exams if no one will pay for them, and practicals (though in the new exam board they are not present only as questions).



    How do you teach yourself : if you have a tutor (which is a good tutor) it should work better than classes, and it will keep you from being "lazy".



    Actually teaching yourself, you should look at it in the way of what do i need to be able to do and how much information do i need to know for this to achieve the grade I desire.
    After you have those 2 conditions its best to have questions to enhance understanding all the way, (people usually advice to do past paper after past paper once the knowledge is there).

    My approach after having a lot of trail errors over the years would clearly be: Learn the specification and the answers to it via an endorsed textbook or one that covers all of it (as it is in depth) and possibly an excellent revision guide (also Google anything you can not find, but its mostly faster to find in a book). Rehearse the content on the specification and knowledge to good understanding never, underestimate the fact that practicals or things which seem less important can have questions. Now you should be done pretty much and its time to go all out into the perfection by doing questions , any you can find all you can find starting from your book to past papers to other exam boards and so on. review your specification (every now and then and ensure nothing is forgotten) and most importantly memorize the titles with the information. Keep in mind to be as the mark scheme states.
    Then do more questions , if you run out redo them.

    (do keep in mind that for different exam boards your grades may drop as they do have a different specification, its not bad to learn about it although you should always stick to your specification when arguments occur).

    This should get you full marks if you do not panic on pretty much all exams (though maths really depends on the questions you have done previously).

    For exams aim to finish faster than the time as something like this will give you plenty of time to double check by that i mean during the practice. This means practice so that questions will seem equally easy to you and fast.

    Lastly if theres things you do not understand it is quite possible you will spent excessive hours on such this is the time when it helps to have teachers though they would not always answer helpfully or you may not always ask. Essentially you should attempt to use more resources and spend that longer time on things you don't understand or ask questions on forums to explain to you while you cover other topics so time stays efficient.

    That is if your learning on your own. As for a sixth form theres the chance for being accepted into a course through trail periods to see if you can cope but well they will test you on.
    (Your GCSE knowledge and the ability to adapt to A level) pretty much right away.. If you come Across as promising they will keep you , they don't always understand that getting bad GCSE grades do not mean bad A levels but I'm sure you can see why they think so.
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    If I don't get into sixth form due to poor GCSE grades I will self teach myself A level maths, chemistry and physics. Does this sound good to you?

    I just want a challenge and that's what I love about A levels! The fact that you have to really think and put in a lot of effort in order to do well.

    So basically I really want to do A levels and plus what I want to do at uni requires those subjects. Now if for whatever reason I'm unable to get into sixth form because I achieved a 'C' as opposed to a grade 'B' in any subject does self teaching sound good? Has anyone who taught themselves A levels done exceptionally well?

    Also last question is how do you teach yourself? It is using a text book and internet isn't it and maybe a tutor, right?
    You could self-teach, but it wouldn't be particularly straightforward. You'd have to find an exam centre that offered a course (so you wouldn't get a choice of spec), you might struggle to get the practicals/coursework/controlled assessments done, and that certainly wouldn't be cheap to do it at a centre, and self-teaching wouldn't be easy. There would be no-one to mark past papers or set you questions, or answer any of your questions. On the surface it may seem like an easy process - grab a textbook and memorise it - but A levels are a lot tougher than GCSEs.

    Additionally, if you're not consistently getting As and A*s in the subjects you want to do for A level, you will struggle. The requirements that sixth forms set aren't there to be cruel - they exist because you'll need the skills and knowledge from a top GCSE grade in order to succeed at A level. At my sixth form, I don't know of anyone who got an A at AS level in a subject that they didn't get an A in at GCSE - and getting a C would make it even more difficult.

    It might be better to either choose different A levels or perhaps a different route, such as BTECs or an apprenticeship - I don't intend to be mean, but if you're struggling already, A levels won't be any different. You say you want a challenge, but if GCSEs were a challenge, then A levels will be nearly impossible; they're not for everyone.

    But if you really want to do it, then get in touch with local schools, sixth forms and exam centres, as you'll need to be entered for the exams somewhere. It's also worth enquiring at the time about coursework, to see what support, if any, you'll get for that. Whereas at a school/college you'd get (very necessary) coursework feedback, at an exam centre you simply wouldn't.
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    I think that is definitively feasible as long as you have the passion for them.
    However, some problems might arise from self-study. You'd better check the new specification to see how practical works. Luckily there is no practical coursework involved for the new spec during AS period which means you can find an exam centre easily and practical part no longer contributes to your overall A-level grade but becomes a separate endorsement along with your A-level. BUT...when you are going to sit whole science A-level, seeking a exam centre which can offer you practical endorsement will be extremely hard, and if you did, that would be very very pricy. That's because the new spec requires you to carry out at least 12 practicals to qualify "practical endorsement " as opposed to 1-2 practical plus written coursework the legacy spec did. I also heard some universities don't need a Pass in practical endorsement if you study a non-science related major,not sure....
    Would it be possible that you sit AS exams and get decent AS grade and then convince sixth form to let you start the second year of A-level directly since you haven't got convincing GCSEs.

    Apart from the entry to the exams, I don't think self-study these A-level is really a big problem, especially for maths - you just need to practice doing loads of questions either from textbook or past papers, and maths is the easiest subject to self-teach I suppose. For chemistry and physics there are more emphasis on understanding and applying knowledge. Bear in mind there are some people who have achieved high grade by self-teach. All is your dedication, motivation.
 
 
 
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