Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    Ok listen love, I have this but it's pretty mild. I think it's some form of OCD. It's actually much common than you think. It hurts me to think you were embarassed of this but seriously don't be, you're not crazy. I recommend to rub your hands together and that it's all in your head (from experience)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Don't worry... I'm sure many ppl share the same thing but just cba to speak up about it. I swear I mutter wtf at least 50 times a day... and I always think jow weird it is... it should come and go. If its a physiological effect then BEFORE u do it again.. just think about how pointless it is and only wastes a matter of seconds.... time's limited

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    I haven't heard of this before but perhaps you could start doing less and less of that routine? For example, rather than doing things 3 times, doing once. Also, when you feel that you, or you brain, is not happy with something, perhaps imagine yourself being happy,not that makes sense. Like not allowing negative thoughts.
    I would also suggest speaking to a member of your family or a specialist. Maybe they can help you be over this problem.

    Hope that helps!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mrs.Grey)
    Ok listen love, I have this but it's pretty mild. I think it's some form of OCD. It's actually much common than you think.
    ohh, ok. I guess it was pointless making this then, eh?
    I didn't know it was a form of OCD, thanks for letting me know then.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    ohh, ok. I guess it was pointless making this then, eh?
    I didn't know it was a form of OCD, thanks for letting me know then.
    No, it wasn't. You would've never known if I never told you Things always happen for a reason.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amanii_ox)
    Don't worry... I'm sure many ppl share the same thing but just cba to speak up about it. I swear I mutter wtf at least 50 times a day... and I always think jow weird it is... it should come and go. If its a physiological effect then BEFORE u do it again.. just think about how pointless it is and only wastes a matter of seconds.... time's limited

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's true, it is a waste of time, and that's a good idea. It definitely is pointless, and I should shift my mindset in that direction.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sahra30013)
    I haven't heard of this before but perhaps you could start doing less and less of that routine? For example, rather than doing things 3 times, doing once. Also, when you feel that you, or you brain, is not happy with something, perhaps imagine yourself being happy,not that makes sense. Like not allowing negative thoughts.
    I would also suggest speaking to a member of your family or a specialist. Maybe they can help you be over this problem.

    Hope that helps!
    Ah, that does help, thanks! The happy thoughts idea is defintely a good one, I usually stress myself out excessively over these things, so it sounds good to think positively. thanks again
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    I understand. I have to almost identical things including the calculator in the exam, very annoying.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mrs.Grey)
    No, it wasn't. You would've never known if I never told you Things always happen for a reason.
    Thank you helping me out, I really appreciated it
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Ah, that does help, thanks! The happy thoughts idea is defintely a good one, I usually stress myself out excessively over these things, so it sounds good to think positively. thanks again
    Your welcome!
    • #1
    #1

    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    This definitely sounds like OCD. I would really advise you to speak to someone about this, especially as it's affecting your exams.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    This definitely sounds like OCD. I would really advise you to speak to someone about this, especially as it's affecting your exams.
    I've been googling this now, and it definitely sounds like it so. I'm not sure about seeing a specialist though, it's still something that's difficult to describe for my family to understand. I think I may need to go though
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    I've been googling this now, and it definitely sounds like it so. I'm not sure about seeing a specialist though, it's still something that's difficult to describe for my family to understand. I think I may need to go though
    My sister's ex had (medically diagnosed) OCD and this is the exact behaviour he would do.

    It's best to see a specialist - it doesn't matter if it's something your family don't understand, tell them you need to see a doctor for it. They can offer you different forms of help, such as SSRIs, which can reduce symptoms and help you lead a better quality of life.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by celloel)
    My sister's ex had (medically diagnosed) OCD and this is the exact behaviour he would do.

    It's best to see a specialist - it doesn't matter if it's something your family don't understand, tell them you need to see a doctor for it. They can offer you different forms of help, such as SSRIs, which can reduce symptoms and help you lead a better quality of life.
    I didn't think there were actual treatments for this, the thought of that does make me feel so much better, that something can actually be done to change things. I'm going to try to explain it more clearly to them so it seem like I'm making a big deal out of something small, because I rhink I do need to see someone about this.
    thanks for the advice
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Hi all,

    I've had this problem for a while now, (about 3-4 years) but I'd never fully addressed it. Sure, it was annoying and it took over things from time to time - but it wasn't something I thought too deeply about. That was until it ultimately affected a GCSE exam, and I realise now it's not normal.

    I have an obsession with numbers and counting, most things I do or say have to be thought out a certain number of times and if not, I have to go back and do it again. I'll give you a current example: when I went to get the juice I'm drinking now, I had to do my routine when I came back in my room, which is to tap the curtain onto the radiator beneath it two times with each hand, making sure I use at least three fingers and repeat this 6 times. If less than three fingers of my hand touch the curtain, or it's not aligned- I start again.
    I can't do anything else if this isn't done, and if it is, than everything's okay. But I could be standing there for 10 minutes until it's perfect because my mind won't let me stop.

    This is a small example, but it's similar to my night routines (tapping the door, aligning things, pushing the chair 2-3 times,etc). It used to be much much worse. I wouldn't go to sleep until I saw a white van pass by on the motorway. I remember standing there once for so long, my feet started getting tired and my body was begging me to go to sleep but I just couldn't. Nowadays, these routines aren't done everyday, just when I remember, and when I do I have to do it. It could literally be anything, like running back downstairs from my sleep to check the door is locked, and having to do it another three times, or checking the taps in the bathroom etc. And I swear, it gets so tiring, and it's all so pointless. The worst feeling I get is when I have to go back and start from the top, and I can't believe I never questioned the absurdity.

    In my maths exam, i ran out of time. I'm not going to blame the counting thing entirely as I could've revised harder, but it definitely played a part. I would check answers with my calculator repetitively, for even simple sums like 2x3, and would press clear and do the sum again enough times until my mind was happy. And I did this for many questions, for no solid reason, and I hate it, I hate that I wasted so much time in such an important test.

    It's weird to think these routines are there when I'm so disorganised and dysfunctional, I could have more useful routines but I don't. With everything else, I go with the flow. With this, I can't and it ruins my sleep, and now my studies.

    I know this is hard to decipher and hard to understand, but has anyone got any advice? I really don't want things to get any worse

    -I was going to tick the anon box, but I decided to just post it anyway in hopes no one thinks of me differently or weirdly
    Hiya. I know there's already been a good few replies but I have some personal experience with this so always like to comment if I can. I should certinally hope nobody's going to judge you for it and if they do they'll have to judge me and a bunch of others too
    Sounds like what you have is OCD. I developed mine around the time of GCSEs when I had a bad time with family being ill and things. It's a mental health condition related to anxiety and usually sticks around or gets worse unless you do something about it. It's something not many people know about or understand too well and tends to sneak up on you so it's pretty easy to get caught up in it before you have a chance to do anything about it.

    It's classed as a disability in terms of school and work so if it is affecting your work you can apply for DSA to get help. You need medical proof (doctors note) and then you'll have an asessment to see what help you are entitled to and would benefit from. I actually got a lot of help when I applied for DSA so it's worth doing.

    As far as diagnosis goes you see a doctor and they will probably refer you to a psychiatrist (may not though). It helps to write everything down before and take it in so you don't forget. Include things like what "rituals" or thoughts or complusions you have, when it started and how it affects you.
    If you are diagnosed they will most likely suggest CBT (a therapy that focuses on understanding and managing you thouhts and compulsions) and possibly medication. Therapy helped me a lot eventually but was pretty annoying to start with. I was put on medication because I also had depression and I really wanted it sorted.
    If you are under 18 you may be refered to a service called CAMHS. It's a little odd cos it's designed mostly for children, but it's basically the same as an adult mental health service.

    I suggest you look at resources on sites like mind.org and ocduk.org for information and advice. I was really confused when I had OCD and for a long time I didn't even understand that I had it. I'll be honest before I experienced it I'm not sure I really believed in mental health conditions or that i'd ever even thought about them. I found that once you give people a bit of time and explenation they tend to become supportive (or at least not judgemental) so don't be afraid to open up to some people about it.

    Good luck and if you want you can pm me or reply here if you have any more questions

    Just to let you know you're not alone i'll tell you a little about my experience. I'll spoiler it so it doesn't get in the way.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I developed my OCD along with depression around GCSEs but wasn't diagnosed until just before I went to uni. It got too much for me and meant I failed an entire lot of Alevel exams and had to drop out of uni (twice). It started as flicking light switces loads until it felt right or being fussy about how doors were and checking they were locked. Later it developed into counting every step I took in eights and the number of times I did things increased from a couple to over 30. A lot of nights I couldn't sleep because I just couldn't get my brain to shut up. After CBT (the first time) things started to improve a little and the step counting mostly stopped. I got fed up with CBT though and quit for a while until I left uni. After that I went to group therapy sessions which helped a lot. In this time the meds also started evening me out a bit and helped me cope with therapy better. After stopping therapy I was mostly OCD free. I still had two main things but they were only in the evening and not too disruptive so I chose to slow down and give myself some breating time. Gradually through using what I learned in therapy and improving my general mental wellbeing i've managed to almost completely get rid of my OCD. I still get it a bit but can usually hold off on things and wait without them disrupting me too much. I still let myself give in to a couple of little things as a bit of a safety net and sometimes get bouts of more OCD when I'm stressed, but it is no longer in control of my life.
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    That's true, it is a waste of time, and that's a good idea. It definitely is pointless, and I should shift my mindset in that direction.
    This is fine advice but just make sure you don't beat yourself up about it. It is all in your head but not because you're crazy or anything- because it actually changes your brain. It's all pretty confusing psychology stuff and it's actually a pretty new medical research topic so nobody knows exactly what happens or why but basically there is a part of you brain that tells you when you've done somethin enough (like calculating a sum) and with OCD it just kicks in later so you think you need to do things more.
    Try not to take it all on at once either. Focus on one thing you want to try to manage and work on that. It can take a lot of time to see any noticable progress so try to stay patient and remember that a couple of slip ups do not undo all the progress you have made. Any time you manage to hold off doing something for even a couple of minuets it is a win. You might benefit from watching CampOCD. It focuses on some pretty extreme cases so try not to let it freak you out, but it is rather good at explaining OCD and some of the methods for managing it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kindred)
    Hiya. I know there's already been a good few replies but I have some personal experience with this so always like to comment if I can. I should certinally hope nobody's going to judge you for it and if they do they'll have to judge me and a bunch of others too
    Sounds like what you have is OCD. I developed mine around the time of GCSEs when I had a bad time with family being ill and things. It's a mental health condition related to anxiety and usually sticks around or gets worse unless you do something about it. It's something not many people know about or understand too well and tends to sneak up on you so it's pretty easy to get caught up in it before you have a chance to do anything about it.

    It's classed as a disability in terms of school and work so if it is affecting your work you can apply for DSA to get help. You need medical proof (doctors note) and then you'll have an asessment to see what help you are entitled to and would benefit from. I actually got a lot of help when I applied for DSA so it's worth doing.

    As far as diagnosis goes you see a doctor and they will probably refer you to a psychiatrist (may not though). It helps to write everything down before and take it in so you don't forget. Include things like what "rituals" or thoughts or complusions you have, when it started and how it affects you.
    If you are diagnosed they will most likely suggest CBT (a therapy that focuses on understanding and managing you thouhts and compulsions) and possibly medication. Therapy helped me a lot eventually but was pretty annoying to start with. I was put on medication because I also had depression and I really wanted it sorted.
    If you are under 18 you may be refered to a service called CAMHS. It's a little odd cos it's designed mostly for children, but it's basically the same as an adult mental health service.

    I suggest you look at resources on sites like mind.org and ocduk.org for information and advice. I was really confused when I had OCD and for a long time I didn't even understand that I had it. I'll be honest before I experienced it I'm not sure I really believed in mental health conditions or that i'd ever even thought about them. I found that once you give people a bit of time and explenation they tend to become supportive (or at least not judgemental) so don't be afraid to open up to some people about it.

    Good luck and if you want you can pm me or reply here if you have any more questions

    Just to let you know you're not alone i'll tell you a little about my experience. I'll spoiler it so it doesn't get in the way.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I developed my OCD along with depression around GCSEs but wasn't diagnosed until just before I went to uni. It got too much for me and meant I failed an entire lot of Alevel exams and had to drop out of uni (twice). It started as flicking light switces loads until it felt right or being fussy about how doors were and checking they were locked. Later it developed into counting every step I took in eights and the number of times I did things increased from a couple to over 30. A lot of nights I couldn't sleep because I just couldn't get my brain to shut up. After CBT (the first time) things started to improve a little and the step counting mostly stopped. I got fed up with CBT though and quit for a while until I left uni. After that I went to group therapy sessions which helped a lot. In this time the meds also started evening me out a bit and helped me cope with therapy better. After stopping therapy I was mostly OCD free. I still had two main things but they were only in the evening and not too disruptive so I chose to slow down and give myself some breating time. Gradually through using what I learned in therapy and improving my general mental wellbeing i've managed to almost completely get rid of my OCD. I still get it a bit but can usually hold off on things and wait without them disrupting me too much. I still let myself give in to a couple of little things as a bit of a safety net and sometimes get bouts of more OCD when I'm stressed, but it is no longer in control of my life.
    Thank you so much for sharing that with me, I greatly appreciated it.
    I could definitely relate to your experience, and it felt good to see that someone else had similar thoughts, that it wasn't something that only I do. Many, including you, have suggested seeing a doctor about this, so that's what I've decided to do. From your own experience, I am really glad to see that things are looking up for you and I hope they stay that way as well. When you talked about numbers increasing, i find that's also been happening of late. It may have been because of exam stress, but the majority of my routines have been multiplied by 2, which has made things twice as difficult for me lately.

    Thanks again for the helpful and kind words, and I will definitely start to write down my routines so I can better understand them
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by bluebookie)
    Thank you so much for sharing that with me, I greatly appreciated it.
    I could definitely relate to your experience, and it felt good to see that someone else had similar thoughts, that it wasn't something that only I do. Many, including you, have suggested seeing a doctor about this, so that's what I've decided to do. From your own experience, I am really glad to see that things are looking up for you and I hope they stay that way as well. When you talked about numbers increasing, i find that's also been happening of late. It may have been because of exam stress, but the majority of my routines have been multiplied by 2, which has made things twice as difficult for me lately.

    Thanks again for the helpful and kind words, and I will definitely start to write down my routines so I can better understand them
    I'm glad you've decided to see a doctor. Remember they deal with mh conditions a lot so you won't sound crazy to them
    I found that one of the worst things for me was being confused and upset by it. Any time I got upset that I was doing something it just fed the anxiety causing it and made it worse. Once I understood it better I think it stopped getting worse and became a lot less scary and more managable.

    Best wishes and also there is a Mental Health Support group on here (MHSS). The people on it are really nice and it helped me feel more normal when I was feeling really alone and confused. Check it out if you want to.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kindred)
    I'm glad you've decided to see a doctor. Remember they deal with mh conditions a lot so you won't sound crazy to them
    I found that one of the worst things for me was being confused and upset by it. Any time I got upset that I was doing something it just fed the anxiety causing it and made it worse. Once I understood it better I think it stopped getting worse and became a lot less scary and more managable.

    Best wishes and also there is a Mental Health Support group on here (MHSS). The people on it are really nice and it helped me feel more normal when I was feeling really alone and confused. Check it out if you want to.
    I was worried about not making sense to the doctor, so ty so much for putting me at ease there. I don't really understand my problem, so I think that by reading up on it (ty for the sources, btw) I will know how to handle situations better.

    Again, thank you for all the advice you've given me, I can't properly explain, but it does feel like less of a burden because I've finally been understood and that I'm not crazy.

    I will check out the MHHS here for sure, and thanks once again!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 12, 2016
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.