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    I didn't study physics at a level. I now wish I had. I'm studying double maths, chemistry and biology. I want to study all as I like them all and don't want to specialise. It seems way too early. Is natural sciences the the best way to do this?
    Any help please help me choose the right course. Of all chemistry is my favourite but it's not easy.
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    (Original post by Tonka100)
    I didn't study physics at a level. I now wish I had. I'm studying double maths, chemistry and biology. I want to study all as I like them all and don't want to specialise. It seems way too early. Is natural sciences the the best way to do this?
    Any help please help me choose the right course. Of all chemistry is my favourite but it's not easy.
    Well natural science normally lets you do 3 subjects in first year (except cambridge who do 3 experimental + 1 math) then in second year you start to specialise and 3rd you specialise more.

    However there is some variation between nat sci courses so you are best to check individual uni websites for specifics

    You wont be able to do any physics based options on the nat sci course as you dont have the A-level

    Entry requirements are normally AAA +

    Of the top of my head, leeds, cambridge, york, nottingham, durham and exeter all offer nat sci degrees
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    If you do NatSci I'd definitely pick options such that you have a choice of at least two subjects you could specialise in after first year. Outside of Cambridge most universities sadly aren't very good at that, so to an extent you'll have to pick your potential 'single honours' in first year, and afterwards pursue the single honours or a multi-disciplinary course that will fulfill your requirements but won't be as versatile in the long run. If you would have preferred to do physics, the next best thing would be maths if you specifically like theoretical physics. Mathematicians go into a lot of areas, including physics research.
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    Thank for your advice. It seems strange to Mr that given all science is colliding Nat Sci degrees aren't more prevalent nor more accommodating. For me this collision of sciences less need for specialisation and we need broad thoughts to now solve many of our challenges.

    I hear horror stories about the level of hard work at Cambridge now. Many saying it just isn't fun. I enjoyed visiting Exeter.



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    (Original post by Tonka100)
    Thank for your advice. It seems strange to Mr that given all science is colliding Nat Sci degrees aren't more prevalent nor more accommodating. For me this collision of sciences less need for specialisation and we need broad thoughts to now solve many of our challenges.

    I hear horror stories about the level of hard work at Cambridge now. Many saying it just isn't fun. I enjoyed visiting Exeter.



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    Yeah, exactly, it's hard work to study several subjects side-by-side in sufficient depth. Cambridge students can already barely handle it.
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    (Original post by Tonka100)
    Thank for your advice. It seems strange to Mr that given all science is colliding Nat Sci degrees aren't more prevalent nor more accommodating. For me this collision of sciences less need for specialisation and we need broad thoughts to now solve many of our challenges.

    I hear horror stories about the level of hard work at Cambridge now
    . Many saying it just isn't fun. I enjoyed visiting Exeter.



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    Thats the price you pay for trying to keep a broad range of subjects as even though you cover many areas of science you still need to go to a good enough depth but you still only have the same amount of time as someone at another uni (say oxford) who does just the 1 subject

    Therefore you lose a bit of depth and have to work very hard. Science may have cross overs but these at undergrad arent as common as you might think.
 
 
 
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