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    Hiya,
    I'm just doing the C2 2015 paper and came across the following question:

    5 (b) Metal oxides react with acids to make salts.
    What type of compound is a metal oxide? [1 mark]

    I put 'alkali' but the mark scheme states:
    5 (b) base | ignore alkali

    I'm just wondering why this is - I've never been able to get my head around this topic but I thought alkali/base was pretty much interchangable; is there some way to know whether a product is soluble or not?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by CaptErin)
    Hiya,
    I'm just doing the C2 2015 paper and came across the following question:

    5 (b) Metal oxides react with acids to make salts.
    What type of compound is a metal oxide? [1 mark]

    I put 'alkali' but the mark scheme states:
    5 (b) base | ignore alkali

    I'm just wondering why this is - I've never been able to get my head around this topic but I thought alkali/base was pretty much interchangable; is there some way to know whether a product is soluble or not?

    Thank you
    An alkali is a type of base that can dissolve in water - not all metal oxides can dissolve, hence they're bases, not alkalis.

    And I'm pretty sure that you can tell whether something is soluble or not by looking at the chemical formula of the compound. I think I saw a table on it some while ago.

    Edit: Here's the list.

    Soluble
    Any sodium or potassium salts
    Any nitrate
    Most chlorides, bromides and iodides (exceptions are in Insoluble list)
    Most sulphates (exceptions are in Insoluble list)

    Insoluble
    Silver chloride, bromide and iodide
    Lead chloride, bromide and iodide
    All carbonates (except for sodium and potassium carbonate)
    Barium, calcium, silver and lead sulphate
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    (Original post by leafcannon)
    An alkali is a type of base that can dissolve in water - not all metal oxides can dissolve, hence they're bases, not alkalis.

    And I'm pretty sure that you can tell whether something is soluble or not by looking at the chemical formula of the compound. I think I saw a table on it some while ago.

    Edit: Here's the list.

    Soluble
    Any sodium or potassium salts
    Any nitrate
    Most chlorides, bromides and iodides (exceptions are in Insoluble list)
    Most sulphates (exceptions are in Insoluble list)

    Insoluble
    Silver chloride, bromide and iodide
    Lead chloride, bromide and iodide
    All carbonates (except for sodium and potassium carbonate)
    Barium, calcium, silver and lead sulphate
    Thank you
    I'll never remember all that haha, so unless it states it's soluble I'll just go with base from now on! Thanks though, it was interesting to read
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    (Original post by CaptErin)
    Hiya,
    I'm just doing the C2 2015 paper and came across the following question:

    5 (b) Metal oxides react with acids to make salts.
    What type of compound is a metal oxide? [1 mark]

    I put 'alkali' but the mark scheme states:
    5 (b) base | ignore alkali

    I'm just wondering why this is - I've never been able to get my head around this topic but I thought alkali/base was pretty much interchangable; is there some way to know whether a product is soluble or not?

    Thank you
    bases are metal oxides and metal hydroxides.
    alkalis are type of base: a soluble base (i.e. a metal hydroxide)
    thus, a metal oxide is a base, but not an alkali
    and a metal hydroxide is both a base and and alkali.
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    (Original post by FutureDietitian)
    bases are metal oxides and metal hydroxides.
    alkalis are type of base: a soluble base (i.e. a metal hydroxide)
    thus, a metal oxide is a base, but not an alkali
    and a metal hydroxide is both a base and and alkali.
    Thank youu
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    Soluble
    Any sodium or potassium salts
    Any nitrate
    Most chlorides, bromides and iodides (exceptions are in Insoluble list)
    Most sulphates (exceptions are in Insoluble list)

    Insoluble
    Silver chloride, bromide and iodide
    Lead chloride, bromide and iodide
    All carbonates (except for sodium and potassium carbonate)
    Barium, calcium, silver and lead sulphate[/QUOTE]

    Do we need to know these ?


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    (Original post by z1820)
    Soluble
    Any sodium or potassium salts
    Any nitrate
    Most chlorides, bromides and iodides (exceptions are in Insoluble list)
    Most sulphates (exceptions are in Insoluble list)

    Insoluble
    Silver chloride, bromide and iodide
    Lead chloride, bromide and iodide
    All carbonates (except for sodium and potassium carbonate)
    Barium, calcium, silver and lead sulphate

    Do we need to know these ?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I can't see it on the specification
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    (Original post by CaptErin)
    I can't see it on the specification
    Question came up on 2015 with this topic. It listed the majority of what was stated above and you just had to fill in the blanks😀
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    (Original post by z1820)
    Soluble
    Any sodium or potassium salts
    Any nitrate
    Most chlorides, bromides and iodides (exceptions are in Insoluble list)
    Most sulphates (exceptions are in Insoluble list)

    Insoluble
    Silver chloride, bromide and iodide
    Lead chloride, bromide and iodide
    All carbonates (except for sodium and potassium carbonate)
    Barium, calcium, silver and lead sulphate
    Do we need to know these ?


    Posted from TSR Mobile[/QUOTE]

    I'm not sure - I literally just found it in my book. There might be a question in which you need to name a base/alkali, but I don't think that you really need to know every tiny bit of it.
 
 
 
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