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    Hey guys,
    I'm thinking of changing my uni course to English lit, but I feel like I don't know if it's for me. I mean I enjoy it but I feel like only really articulate people do English at uni, is that true?

    Because my experiences in sixth form have been that the girls that are doing English, are very confident in the subject and well spoken. So If I'm not that confident in it or a good speaker will it matter??
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    (Original post by shazy2014)
    Hey guys,
    I'm thinking of changing my uni course to English lit, but I feel like I don't know if it's for me. I mean I enjoy it but I feel like only really articulate people do English at uni, is that true?

    Because my experiences in sixth form have been that the girls that are doing English, are very confident in the subject and well spoken. So If I'm not that confident in it or a good speaker will it matter??
    Well reading Literature at uni isn't just the enjoyment of reading (although this helps)! It's about you appreciating your critical understanding of texts through extensive and intensive readings of theory, history, and literary genres. Now, mind you, I never looked into literary theories and etc before going to uni, but you need want to fee like you wish to gain academic knowledge from reading and writing about Literature.

    If you want to develop your enthusiasm, skills, appreciation of literature, then a literature degree might be for you. You should also consider what you wish to do with this degree once you finish university. Will it help you get the career you desire (if you've thought about that yet).

    You have to be fairly confident and vocal about your opinions as there is no right or wrong answer. Which means, you have to be able to put your opinion across whether verbal or written in a very confident way. Being well spoken as in Queen's English? No that isn't the case. You speak how you wish to. Of course when you're writing or have a formal speaking/presentation assessment, you should refrain from any colloquialisms, neologisms, slang, etc. Always has to be formal language. But apart from that, you don't have to be well spoken (if you're referring to Queen's English).
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    The Empire Odyssey

    That's the thing, I'm quite in the background of different texts and the context behind it all. I didn't like English at first at the beginning of A2 but now towards the end I've enjoyed it.
    So have you done/ doing English at uni?

    Tbh, I want to go into teaching and I've realised as English is a main subject it might be easier to get onto a teacher training course or a job, rather than another subject.

    Hmm I mean well spoken as in speaking fluently, with a wide range of vocabulary and no grammatical errors, because sometimes I make errors when I speak but not write.

    The thing is with me is that I lack confidence, I tend to believe other people have much more 'correct' or better ideas than me. But I think maybe I could develop that throughout the course.
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    (Original post by shazy2014)
    The Empire Odyssey

    That's the thing, I'm quite in the background of different texts and the context behind it all. I didn't like English at first at the beginning of A2 but now towards the end I've enjoyed it.
    So have you done/ doing English at uni?

    Tbh, I want to go into teaching and I've realised as English is a main subject it might be easier to get onto a teacher training course or a job, rather than another subject.

    Hmm I mean well spoken as in speaking fluently, with a wide range of vocabulary and no grammatical errors, because sometimes I make errors when I speak but not write.

    The thing is with me is that I lack confidence, I tend to believe other people have much more 'correct' or better ideas than me. But I think maybe I could develop that throughout the course.
    Well I don't know if having about 8 months of "enjoying a subject" will be worth the 3 years of enduring. Almost any uni Lit student who has really loved reading and studying literature, will most definitely tell you, a Lit degree sucked the pure enjoyment of reading. One English teacher told us this. He was most definitely right. I do study Lit (and Philosophy) at uni and at time, I just hate reading, I just hate, hate, hate it so much. And I've always been into reading/stories/English Language ever since I was a child!

    Well that can be the case. However, you must be aware that getting a degree in a vocational thing like "Primary Education with QTS" or etc, limits your future prospects. You never know - you might want to leave the course, you might hate teaching. Or you might just even enjoy it, but then become to resent it after a few years. Teaching is at a crisis point now and 50% of teachers would advise aspiring students wanting to become teachers, not to even bother - or at least, wait until the government sorts it out.

    I would at least do something like "English and Education" or something. Even though a degree like that usually teaches you how that particular subject is used and taught in education. It still less restrictive than a teacher training/education (that directly leads to QTS/school) degree.

    You don't need a wide range of vocabulary. I believe that's mostly down to nature. I can't pick up fanciful words as quickly as others I've come to know. But it doesn't put you to a disadvantage any less than it puts them at an advantage. If that's the way they speak, then that has nothing to do with you.
    Not sure what you mean by "speak fluently" - is English not your first language?
    We all make grammatical speech errors. No one thinks that hard about how the speak unless they're really into linguistics and phonetics.

    Confidence is something that will either pick up during uni, or after. Uni courses do implement this into their courses and modules so people can gain and/or grow their confidence skills in public speaking and expressing opinion in a charismatic/confident way.
 
 
 
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