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    Heya

    So I want to apply to universities to study Law soon.

    I'm looking for some extra reading I can do around the subject that I can mention in my personal statement to get brownie points.

    Any suggestions?

    Nothing too difficult please. Although I have a bit of legal knowledge through BTEC Law, it's only very sparse and simple.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Any suggestions?
    I've moved your thread to the Law forum

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    Bumpity bump, got no idea what sort of material I should be looking at.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Bumpity bump, got no idea what sort of material I should be looking at.
    The Rule of Law by Tom Bingham is a good one.
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    Rule of Law. Every law applicant reads it, so give it a go but be aware this will only make you seem at most as average. To impress, you need to do more.

    Brandeis and Warren, The Right to Privacy, is a pretty good one if you want to seem really eager. Then you learn what developed from that in the US and can compare with the situation we have had and have presently the UK. You tie up understanding of tort, public law, international comparative law and ECHR into one exercise. But I am only talking about privacy because it interests me. Find an area of law you like and really enjoy reading about, and read about it! Your true passion for that area, along with critical understanding, will shine through at interview. This is better than discrete bundles of law you try to remember without any real point of reference -- which is invariably the case with introductory texts for applicants.
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    (Original post by Lord Hoffman)
    Rule of Law. Every law applicant reads it, so give it a go but be aware this will only make you seem at most as average. To impress, you need to do more.

    Brandeis and Warren, The Right to Privacy, is a pretty good one if you want to seem really eager. Then you learn what developed from that in the US and can compare with the situation we have had and have presently the UK. You tie up understanding of tort, public law, international comparative law and ECHR into one exercise. But I am only talking about privacy because it interests me. Find an area of law you like and really enjoy reading about, and read about it! Your true passion for that area, along with critical understanding, will shine through at interview. This is better than discrete bundles of law you try to remember without any real point of reference -- which is invariably the case with introductory texts for applicants.
    I tried reading it, but then my teacher said it wouldn't be helpful due to its age and because it focuses on the US.

    Know where I can find other articles? Other than google searching 'X law articles'.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I tried reading it, but then my teacher said it wouldn't be helpful due to its age and because it focuses on the US.

    Know where I can find other articles? Other than google searching 'X law articles'.
    The article focuses on English Law judgments in the tort of confidence. Seems quite wrong to say that it focuses on the US; and it's been mentioned in many English confidence/privacy cases. But as I said, it's much better to look into an area of law you want to look into.

    Journal articles are usually subscription-based and not free, unfortunately. Generally, they're quite technical and not useful without foundational reading anyhow.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Heya

    So I want to apply to universities to study Law soon.

    I'm looking for some extra reading I can do around the subject that I can mention in my personal statement to get brownie points.

    Any suggestions?

    Nothing too difficult please. Although I have a bit of legal knowledge through BTEC Law, it's only very sparse and simple.
    you shouldn't read something in order to impress. what a vain and slightly pathetic use of your faculties, not to mention how you demean yourself. you can take stock of replies of the ilk "you need to do such and such to impress", and you'll find no lack of narrow thinkers who earnestly believe it when they say it, or when they hear others saying it.

    you ought to consider what your genuine interests and abilities are, and if you are suited to law, you can demonstrate that in such a way that the reader will gauge that you are being genuine. you'll find that emanating genuine interest is thus all the more impressive - simply ask yourself, if you were reading two applications, and one is packed full of sophisticated material the applicant had read, but it comes across as affectation, whilst the other, as described emanates an authentic interest, you might be able to see how one demonstrates and one purports to have read about. Understand and be cognisant of the difference.

    lastly, and to address your question as it stands minus the misguided desperation and vanity, you needn't necessarily show you have read legal material. what you would be right thinking to show is that you can understand material which requires a similar/applicable skillset as does law, in order to understand. to that end, you can talk about your mathematical, or scientific interests or further reading. you can adduce complicated philosophy, or other literature which satisfies the criteria I mentioned above. i'm sure that you get the point, and haven't forgotten that in choosing what to read, or pick from what you have already read, you will bear being honest, astute and right-thinking in mind.
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    (Original post by M518)
    you shouldn't read something in order to impress. what a vain and slightly pathetic use of your faculties, not to mention how you demean yourself. you can take stock of replies of the ilk "you need to do such and such to impress", and you'll find no lack of narrow thinkers who earnestly believe it when they say it, or when they hear others saying it.

    you ought to consider what your genuine interests and abilities are, and if you are suited to law, you can demonstrate that in such a way that the reader will gauge that you are being genuine. you'll find that emanating genuine interest is thus all the more impressive - simply ask yourself, if you were reading two applications, and one is packed full of sophisticated material the applicant had read, but it comes across as affectation, whilst the other, as described emanates an authentic interest, you might be able to see how one demonstrates and one purports to have read about. Understand and be cognisant of the difference.

    lastly, and to address your question as it stands minus the misguided desperation and vanity, you needn't necessarily show you have read legal material. what you would be right thinking to show is that you can understand material which requires a similar/applicable skillset as does law, in order to understand. to that end, you can talk about your mathematical, or scientific interests or further reading. you can adduce complicated philosophy, or other literature which satisfies the criteria I mentioned above. i'm sure that you get the point, and haven't forgotten that in choosing what to read, or pick from what you have already read, you will bear being honest, astute and right-thinking in mind.
    If it's vain to want to impress in my application, then call me vain. Lol.

    I'm plenty enthusiastic about it, and I'm sure I would enjoy reading the legal material, but make no mistake I'm doing it primarily with a university application in mind. It's not like I'm putting on a complete show though; I genuinely am interested in the law.

    I don't want to read legal material to get a head start. I want to read legal material to show my enthusiasm, and to show my competency in understanding and interpreting the issues raised. To that end, I can't see how focusing on material from other subject areas would be better, or if it would even be beneficial. I mean, why would I talk about maths/science/literature/whatever in a law app, when I could talk directly about law?
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    (Original post by Lord Hoffman)
    The article focuses on English Law judgments in the tort of confidence. Seems quite wrong to say that it focuses on the US; and it's been mentioned in many English confidence/privacy cases. But as I said, it's much better to look into an area of law you want to look into.

    Journal articles are usually subscription-based and not free, unfortunately. Generally, they're quite technical and not useful without foundational reading anyhow.
    When I say focuses on the US, I mean it was written in the US. I suppose that I just assumed it was referring to US law. Is it not?

    And is the age of it not an issue either?

    The thing is, at this stage there aren't any particular areas of law that I know enough about to be naturally enthusiastic about. Don't get me wrong, I like all the aspects of legal study, and I have looked a lot into it, but I don't have any particular area that leaps out to me.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    When I say focuses on the US, I mean it was written in the US. I suppose that I just assumed it was referring to US law. Is it not?

    And is the age of it not an issue either?

    The thing is, at this stage there aren't any particular areas of law that I know enough about to be naturally enthusiastic about. Don't get me wrong, I like all the aspects of legal study, and I have looked a lot into it, but I don't have any particular area that leaps out to me.
    Age is not an issue because it is the foundation of the modern law of privacy off which everything else follows.

    That is understandable. But though you have studied a BTEC in law, there is not an area which interests you immensely and makes you want to learn more about?
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    The Rule of Law by Tom Bingham is a good one.
    (Original post by Lord Hoffman)
    Rule of Law. Every law applicant reads it, so give it a go but be aware this will only make you seem at most as average. To impress, you need to do more.
    Summaries and reviews of it make it seem like it's more focused on the political role of law. To be honest that's what I'm interested in too, particularly the conflict of the judiciary and politicians. Perhaps I'm more suited for a Politics degree...

    Anyway, is The Rule of Law really relevant for a Law app, or is it more suited to a Politics app?
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    If you are going for brownie points it will stand out by a mile and it will not impress.
    Can't you do some research in something that genuinely interests you?
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Summaries and reviews of it make it seem like it's more focused on the political role of law. To be honest that's what I'm interested in too, particularly the conflict of the judiciary and politicians. Perhaps I'm more suited for a Politics degree...

    Anyway, is The Rule of Law really relevant for a Law app, or is it more suited to a Politics app?
    I mentioned it in my personal statement and got offers - so I'd say it is relevant. It also depends on how you talk about the books you've read - lumping them in for the sake of it will not add much apart from name dropping. Show close reading of the books and link it back to your personal view and goals.
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    (Original post by Pokémontrainer)
    I mentioned it in my personal statement and got offers - so I'd say it is relevant. It also depends on how you talk about the books you've read - lumping them in for the sake of it will not add much apart from name dropping. Show close reading of the books and link it back to your personal view and goals.
    I'll definitely pick that one up then.

    What do you think about this one? http://goo.gl/hpfv6E <-------- 'Is Eating People Wrong?: Great Legal Cases and How they Shaped the World'

    It seems that this one covers a number of areas of law, which would be helpful considering I don't really have a particular area of law that interests me. The fact that it examines actual cases might also be useful for forming opinions and criticism in my personal statement of how the law is applied. Like how you said about 'linking it back to your personal views and goals'.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I'll definitely pick that one up then.

    What do you think about this one? http://goo.gl/hpfv6E <-------- 'Is Eating People Wrong?: Great Legal Cases and How they Shaped the World'

    It seems that this one covers a number of areas of law, which would be helpful considering I don't really have a particular area of law that interests me. The fact that it examines actual cases might also be useful for forming opinions and criticism in my personal statement of how the law is applied. Like how you said about 'linking it back to your personal views and goals'.
    Hmm rather than the book, perhaps just mention solely a case that interested you (in relation to the judgement and perhaps how everything was handled) - that will leave a good impression.
    Also, The Trial by Franz Kafka? Look that up maybe. It isn't necessary by any means, as it is quite intermediate, but impressive.
 
 
 
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