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    Hi guys,

    I want to study Medicine at a Post-graduate level and was certain that studying Biomedical Science was the best route to take until recently.

    I attended a science seminar a few days ago so I could get better knowledge of Biomedical Sciences, but during the seminar one of the lecturers started talking about Healthcare Sciences which seems so much more relevant to applying for Post-graduate Medicine!

    From my understanding, Healthcare Science is very similar to Biomedical Science but it is instead funded by the NHS, registers the student with IBMS and HCPC boards and involves clinical placements during the summer holidays; is this correct?

    To me is seems like the better option, and it seems a stupid question to ask considering all the above benefits, but would Healthcare Science be a better option to study to then apply for Post-grad Medicine or is Biomedical Science preferred?

    I'll call around universities to find out, but I'd also like this communities opinion!

    Thanks in future reference!

    Michael
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    (Original post by Michaellatte)
    Hi guys,

    I want to study Medicine at a Post-graduate level and was certain that studying Biomedical Science was the best route to take until recently.

    I attended a science seminar a few days ago so I could get better knowledge of Biomedical Sciences, but during the seminar one of the lecturers started talking about Healthcare Sciences which seems so much more relevant to applying for Post-graduate Medicine!

    From my understanding, Healthcare Science is very similar to Biomedical Science but it is instead funded by the NHS, registers the student with IBMS and HCPC boards and involves clinical placements during the summer holidays; is this correct?

    To me is seems like the better option, and it seems a stupid question to ask considering all the above benefits, but would Healthcare Science be a better option to study to then apply for Post-grad Medicine or is Biomedical Science preferred?

    I'll call around universities to find out, but I'd also like this communities opinion!

    Thanks in future reference!

    Michael
    In terms of graduate entry medicine (it's not postgraduate, that's a misnomer) both degrees will be equally accepted. Do whichever you want to study for three years.

    But why gem? Have you ruled out going straight in to medicine?

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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    In terms of graduate entry medicine (it's not postgraduate, that's a misnomer) both degrees will be equally accepted. Do whichever you want to study for three years.

    But why gem? Have you ruled out going straight in to medicine?

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    Sorry for the late reply Forest.

    I don't come from a science background so therefore I'd prefer an extra year doing a science based degree rather than redo A levels over 2 years, also with the degree I can apply for both 4 & 5 year medicine courses.

    What I don't understand is as to why the entry requirements for the 5 year course are much higher than the 4 year GEM?

    University of Nottingham graduate requirements are:

    5 year Medicine - 2:1 Science based degree + AAA in A Level (Bio + Chem)

    4 year GEM - 2:2 in any degree with clinical work experience

    Why is the 4 year GEM requirements easier?

    Thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by Michaellatte)
    Sorry for the late reply Forest.

    I don't come from a science background so therefore I'd prefer an extra year doing a science based degree rather than redo A levels over 2 years, also with the degree I can apply for both 4 & 5 year medicine courses.

    What I don't understand is as to why the entry requirements for the 5 year course are much higher than the 4 year GEM?

    University of Nottingham graduate requirements are:

    5 year Medicine - 2:1 Science based degree + AAA in A Level (Bio + Chem)

    4 year GEM - 2:2 in any degree with clinical work experience

    Why is the 4 year GEM requirements easier?

    Thanks in advance!
    I have no idea why the GEM requiements are different, you would have to ask Nottingham.

    Bear in mind, graduates on a five year course don't get their tuition fees funded, so you'll need a spare 36k.

    Have you looked in to the six year, foundation medicine courses designed for people who don't have science a-levels. Its a much more straightforward (and cheaper) option than aiming for GEM.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I have no idea why the GEM requiements are different, you would have to ask Nottingham.

    Bear in mind, graduates on a five year course don't get their tuition fees funded, so you'll need a spare 36k.

    Have you looked in to the six year, foundation medicine courses designed for people who don't have science a-levels. Its a much more straightforward (and cheaper) option than aiming for GEM.
    I've looked into the foundation years and they all have requirements you must fulfill like having had free school dinner meals and being the first in your generation to go university etc.

    Are they the foundation years you're referring to?

    This link is what I used to find them:
    http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students...nicalyear.aspx
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    (Original post by Michaellatte)
    I've looked into the foundation years and they all have requirements you must fulfill like having had free school dinner meals and being the first in your generation to go university etc.

    Are they the foundation years you're referring to?

    This link is what I used to find them:
    http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Students...nicalyear.aspx
    Yes, some of them have foundation years based on widening participation but others are for those without science backgroud. A quick go down the list found me Manchester's foundation year programme for those without science A-levels (but you still require AAA). Dundee also offers a foundation year (although you need to pass a separate interview and get a high UKCAT at the end to progress on to the medicine course.
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Yes, some of them have foundation years based on widening participation but others are for those without science backgroud. A quick go down the list found me Manchester's foundation year programme for those without science A-levels (but you still require AAA). Dundee also offers a foundation year (although you need to pass a separate interview and get a high UKCAT at the end to progress on to the medicine course.
    You're a great help! I'll have a look now and consider applying for them for 2017; thank you!
 
 
 
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