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    I have got my CBAT booked for 29th June and I'm convinced I read somewhere you couldn't use a calculator or pen and paper to work things out whilst taking the tests, but can't seem to find it anywhere now. To anyone who has done the tests, is this the case?
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    None of the maths is complicated enough to require a calculator - it's all mental arithmetic.

    It's more a case of wasting time to use a calculator, though I'm sure I've read people say that you do have a pad and pencil. But again, you're restricted for time so much that using them may cost you more than you'd gain.
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    no, you're not allowed to use pen or paper. it's supposed to simulate being in the cockpit.
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    Thank you for the replies, much appreciated
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    The only thing you're allowed to have on your desk/working area is a cup of water and that has to be on the floor, you're essentially sat at a desk with a computer, and dividers either side of you to separate you from the people either side. You don't need a calculator or a pen or paper as the maths is supposed to be done in your head. Depending on the role you're going for you will be given a sheet of paper with a graph on it that you'll need for one of the excercises, but that will be given to you before needed and taken away once you're done. The only thing you need worry about is completing the tests.
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    I attended cbat last week and can confirm you are not allowed pen or paper.
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    I think it's purely to test your mental ability anyway.
    I did my CBAT yesterday, I was going for WSOp but actually found I passed the grade for Pilot/RPAS although I don't have the qualifications to go for either.

    There is a test in there where you will be given a piece of paper with tables on it, but you will not be allowed any paper for calculations or a pen. They will also tell you don't be rummaging through your pockets during the test as it isn't a good look and they may think you're trying to cheat/read notes/calculators, etc.

    Although, on any of the parts that you may wish to have a calculator, you do not actually have enough time to be typing numbers into a calculator, it would actually be faster to just work it out quickly in your head, due to most of the maths that you must do in most of these tests aren't actually difficult.
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    Hey

    I've just got my date for my CBAT on the 5th September. One question I have is how long is the test overall? I've heard it can be up too 7 hours!
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    (Original post by FreelanceGoat)
    Hey

    I've just got my date for my CBAT on the 5th September. One question I have is how long is the test overall? I've heard it can be up too 7 hours!
    Had mine today - 8 hours!
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    (Original post by ryan9900)
    Had mine today - 8 hours!
    Apart from the obvious that it must have been knackering, how was it? Any tips or advice on preparation?
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    (Original post by FreelanceGoat)
    Apart from the obvious that it must have been knackering, how was it? Any tips or advice on preparation?
    Absolutely.

    So what to expect? A very chilled out time at Cranwell, especially the evening prior to the CBAT. Talk to people. You don't need to be weirdly over-familiar with anyone and if you're not the most sociable or talkative person then that's fine. You're just sitting in a room with other people who are going through the same as you. Chances are, at least one of them will have done it before and a few might be currently serving so you can get some advice and hear interesting stories etc.

    You can drink the night before, but obviously don't go crazy. You'll be wanting to get an early night and be as well rested as possible for the next day. You'll wake up at around 0600, get breakfast for 0630 and then you'll be seated in Adastral Hall (where the test takes place) ready for a brief. The brief has all the relevant information you'd expect. They will tell you a little bit about the test itself and about the breaks you'll be getting. Different people will be sitting different tests, and even the people who are sitting the exact same tests will finish at different times, so breaks vary for everyone. You get a 5 minute break at least every hour, but some times this is every 20, or 40 minutes. You get a 45 minute lunch break and there should be one or two people at least who get the same kind of time for lunch as you meaning at least you can walk down to the mess with someone.

    The test itself isn't actually as daunting as I expected. This is mainly because you choose how long you want to spend reading instructions of every test. Yes, there is a time limit. But it's long enough to allow you to read the instructions, complete the practise test, read the instructions again and complete the practise a second time. Once you have read and practised twice, you have no option but to start the test. This is really good though because a few of them can be a little confusing. Having the option to spend a couple of extra minutes reading the instructions helped take the edge off quite a bit.

    In terms of what you can practise, I can only tell you the same things you would hav read on forums like these a million times before. SDT, mental maths, angles, bearings etc. With SDT, it's not as simple as 'You're travelling at 420kts, how long will it take you to travel 7nm?'. It's more along the lines of 'You are travelling from point Alpha to point Zulu via Point Kilo, there are storms en route which slow you down, you're carrying a load which weighs 500kg. What will be your arrival time?' You have tables which will show how the load weight affects the speed, how the storm affects the speed, and also how much fuel you will need etc. SDT is definitely playing a part and it's something you want to be able to do instantaneously, but it's not the only part. Mental maths is simple enough. You have just over a minute to answer as many questions as you can. There are 50 questions but from what people said, I don't think anyone got 50. I didn't either.

    Angles and bearings are worth getting familiar with, as are flight instruments. Everything else is pretty much testing the natural skills you either have or don't have. None of it is particularly difficult, but the pressure increases and you can't lose focus. You might feel like you have done horrendously on the very first test but if you let that thought stay in your head when the next test comes up, you'll struggle. People think they have done badly and actually go onto pass it really well.

    Some of the tests are actually really enjoyable. All of the tests with the joystick are good because it gives your brain a rest for a few minutes. The rapid tracking test was probably my favourite. Essentially it gives you different targets and in this scenario you're a photographer in an aircraft and you have to locate and track the targets and take three photos of each. It was a nice test and felt like a break as you can switch off mentally and just let your hand/eye coordination take over for a bit.

    All in all, I wouldn't say it's as exhausting as I thought it was going to be. I would definitely recommend taking the majority of your 5 minute breaks. Even if it's to walk down the corridor and look out the window. Just relax for a few minutes and then go back in a little fresher. However, if you're on a roll and you're feeling good, you can skip the breaks as much as you want. I probably took about 1 in 3 breaks and felt fine but everyone is different.

    If you have any specific questions about the tests or the day in general then just ask. I just tried to give a brief overview of everything but you're probably curious about something I haven't mentioned so let me know.

    I scored pretty well in the test, qualifying for pretty much all branches except pilot which is what I applied for. I decided not to take a second or third choice and decided to return next August to give it another go.
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    (Original post by ryan9900)
    Absolutely.

    So what to expect? A very chilled out time at Cranwell, especially the evening prior to the CBAT. Talk to people. You don't need to be weirdly over-familiar with anyone and if you're not the most sociable or talkative person then that's fine. You're just sitting in a room with other people who are going through the same as you. Chances are, at least one of them will have done it before and a few might be currently serving so you can get some advice and hear interesting stories etc.

    You can drink the night before, but obviously don't go crazy. You'll be wanting to get an early night and be as well rested as possible for the next day. You'll wake up at around 0600, get breakfast for 0630 and then you'll be seated in Adastral Hall (where the test takes place) ready for a brief. The brief has all the relevant information you'd expect. They will tell you a little bit about the test itself and about the breaks you'll be getting. Different people will be sitting different tests, and even the people who are sitting the exact same tests will finish at different times, so breaks vary for everyone. You get a 5 minute break at least every hour, but some times this is every 20, or 40 minutes. You get a 45 minute lunch break and there should be one or two people at least who get the same kind of time for lunch as you meaning at least you can walk down to the mess with someone.

    The test itself isn't actually as daunting as I expected. This is mainly because you choose how long you want to spend reading instructions of every test. Yes, there is a time limit. But it's long enough to allow you to read the instructions, complete the practise test, read the instructions again and complete the practise a second time. Once you have read and practised twice, you have no option but to start the test. This is really good though because a few of them can be a little confusing. Having the option to spend a couple of extra minutes reading the instructions helped take the edge off quite a bit.

    In terms of what you can practise, I can only tell you the same things you would hav read on forums like these a million times before. SDT, mental maths, angles, bearings etc. With SDT, it's not as simple as 'You're travelling at 420kts, how long will it take you to travel 7nm?'. It's more along the lines of 'You are travelling from point Alpha to point Zulu via Point Kilo, there are storms en route which slow you down, you're carrying a load which weighs 500kg. What will be your arrival time?' You have tables which will show how the load weight affects the speed, how the storm affects the speed, and also how much fuel you will need etc. SDT is definitely playing a part and it's something you want to be able to do instantaneously, but it's not the only part. Mental maths is simple enough. You have just over a minute to answer as many questions as you can. There are 50 questions but from what people said, I don't think anyone got 50. I didn't either.

    Angles and bearings are worth getting familiar with, as are flight instruments. Everything else is pretty much testing the natural skills you either have or don't have. None of it is particularly difficult, but the pressure increases and you can't lose focus. You might feel like you have done horrendously on the very first test but if you let that thought stay in your head when the next test comes up, you'll struggle. People think they have done badly and actually go onto pass it really well.

    Some of the tests are actually really enjoyable. All of the tests with the joystick are good because it gives your brain a rest for a few minutes. The rapid tracking test was probably my favourite. Essentially it gives you different targets and in this scenario you're a photographer in an aircraft and you have to locate and track the targets and take three photos of each. It was a nice test and felt like a break as you can switch off mentally and just let your hand/eye coordination take over for a bit.

    All in all, I wouldn't say it's as exhausting as I thought it was going to be. I would definitely recommend taking the majority of your 5 minute breaks. Even if it's to walk down the corridor and look out the window. Just relax for a few minutes and then go back in a little fresher. However, if you're on a roll and you're feeling good, you can skip the breaks as much as you want. I probably took about 1 in 3 breaks and felt fine but everyone is different.

    If you have any specific questions about the tests or the day in general then just ask. I just tried to give a brief overview of everything but you're probably curious about something I haven't mentioned so let me know.

    I scored pretty well in the test, qualifying for pretty much all branches except pilot which is what I applied for. I decided not to take a second or third choice and decided to return next August to give it another go.
    May sound a daft question but what do I need to take? Do I need money for food? & also do we get shown where to go?
    I've got mine next week!
    Naomi
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    (Original post by Naomih200)
    May sound a daft question but what do I need to take? Do I need money for food? & also do we get shown where to go?
    I've got mine next week!
    Naomi
    No money required, all is provided such as meals and accommodation.

    Depends how you arrive, if by minibus you'll be dropped outside the candidates mess entrance, if you are driving - you have to sign in at the guardroom first and park your car near the candidates mess.


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    (Original post by CHalloway)
    Brilliant overview Ryan, very helpful thank you.

    What sort of dress code are people wearing the day before and the day of the test?

    When OASC was three days and included the tests I believe it was an unwritten rule to suit up but the tests sound long and being uncomfortable is the last thing you'd want!
    Suits, mate. One guy had a tweed jacket - looked fairly dapper to be fair.

    On the day of the test, you can relax and take your jacket and tie off.


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    Any tips for OASC?! Mines soon!
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    (Original post by Naomih200)
    Any tips for OASC?! Mines soon!
    This forum is full of them, have a search for OASC and you can find a fully detailed commentary for every section.
 
 
 
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