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    Any predicted questions for tomorrow's exam? 16/06/2016
    4A American politics???
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    The scope for topic 1 is really wide. There is a fairly small amount of knowledge, it's more about reacting properly to the question, so it's hard to make a prediction. Just know your checks and balances, know how federalism works, know how amendments work, know some historical context for the constitution.

    For topic 4, the only other one I'm revising for, I think the 30-marker might relate to the Supreme Court's role as the defender of the people's rights and the Bill of Rights specifically. Good things to read up on might be the Incorporation Doctrine, and the arguments for/against the judicial activism of the Warren/Burger courts. For good marks you could use contemporary examples like Obergefell v Hodges or Citizens United v FEC.

    For the topic 4 ten-marker just look over the key concepts for the module and memorise a simple definition for each that you can regurgitate on the paper. Past six years the ten-marker her has always been just explaining one of these concepts.

    Just predictions. Cover everything if you can.
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    (Original post by shinsukato)
    The scope for topic 1 is really wide. There is a fairly small amount of knowledge, it's more about reacting properly to the question, so it's hard to make a prediction. Just know your checks and balances, know how federalism works, know how amendments work, know some historical context for the constitution.

    For topic 4, the only other one I'm revising for, I think the 30-marker might relate to the Supreme Court's role as the defender of the people's rights and the Bill of Rights specifically. Good things to read up on might be the Incorporation Doctrine, and the arguments for/against the judicial activism of the Warren/Burger courts. For good marks you could use contemporary examples like Obergefell v Hodges or Citizens United v FEC.

    For the topic 4 ten-marker just look over the key concepts for the module and memorise a simple definition for each that you can regurgitate on the paper. Past six years the ten-marker her has always been just explaining one of these concepts.

    Just predictions. Cover everything if you can.
    I know all this but I'm struggling with finding "current examples" to back up an argument?
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I know all this but I'm struggling with finding "current examples" to back up an argument?
    Current examples of checks and balances:

    Obama has nominated Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court (executive checks judicial). The Senate are refusing to even speak to him, so they won't approve him. This is a check on Obama's power.

    Obama vetoed a bill that would allow the Keystone XL pipeline to be built, citing environmental concerns. Check on Congress' power.

    The Roberts Court struck down the BCRA in Citizens United v FEC. A check on Congress' power.

    The big current issues for the Roberts Court: campaign finance (citizens united), gay marriage (obergefell), gun control (DC v Heller, McDonald v Chicago) and MAYBE abortion (Gonzalez v Carhart).
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I know all this but I'm struggling with finding "current examples" to back up an argument?
    Also one example of federalism that I think reads well in an essay:

    Four states share a corner border: Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona. You can cross the borders literally by taking a single step. If you commit a murder in Utah or Arizona, you can be sentenced to die. In Colorado and New Mexico, the death penalty is illegal. It's an easy way to remember the different laws in the different states.
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    (Original post by shinsukato)
    x
    Thankyou, both posts are very helpful!
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    Feeling nervous just learning Supreme Court and constitution? Anyone else just learning two topics
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    (Original post by hazzapp)
    Feeling nervous just learning Supreme Court and constitution? Anyone else just learning two topics
    I am, those same subjects. Just make sure you know them really, really well! Especially look over all of the Key Concepts (listed here: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...50-W-SP-14.PDF) and be able to explain all of them.
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    (Original post by hazzapp)
    Feeling nervous just learning Supreme Court and constitution? Anyone else just learning two topics
    I am also doing just those two.
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    (Original post by shinsukato)
    I am, those same subjects. Just make sure you know them really, really well! Especially look over all of the Key Concepts (listed here: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...50-W-SP-14.PDF) and be able to explain all of them.
    Do you think the consequences of federalism may be a question? It's in the textbooks and on the spec?
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    (Original post by hazzapp)
    Do you think the consequences of federalism may be a question? It's in the textbooks and on the spec?
    It may well be. Topic 1 is difficult to predict because it's so broad.

    Federalism has been an entire 30 marker to itself, or it could be a single paragraph in a more broad 'separation of powers' essay. I'd study it up.
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    **** knows why but doing a question on the supreme court for me is nigh impossible, going to prepare for topic 1 2 and 3 but if something other than the role of the president comes up on that 30 marker im out like a light mate
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    (Original post by 123789p)
    x
    (Original post by shinsukato)
    Tx
    (Original post by hazzapp)
    x
    (Original post by BIG.T.420)
    x

    How did it go? Did anyone answer Congress? and if you didn't, it was an utterly ridiculous and stupid question and I wish I had just stuck with learning the Supreme court but eih I guess thats life.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    How did it go? Did anyone answer Congress? and if you didn't, it was an utterly ridiculous and stupid question and I wish I had just stuck with learning the Supreme court but eih I guess thats life.
    I did legislature and executive.

    For advice and consent I talked about the importance of both ratifying treaties and federal appointments.

    For parties in congress on one side I said about increased in polarisation, and redistricting and permanent campaign means parties are more important in the House. On the other side I talked about the decentralised nature of the parties and a lack of carrots and stick, and internal coalitions, and the advice and consent powers (ratifying treaties especially) combined with longer terms means parties are less important in the Senate.

    For spoils system I talked about how it leads to a loyalty-competency payoff, giving the example of Michael Brown nominated by Bush before Katrina, and how it is constitutionally viable as laws must be "faithfully executed", and a president has more faith in a loyal friend.

    For vulnerability vs. strength, I talked about polarisation in Congress, gridlock and need for the power of persuasion, but on the other side I talked about how the president is strong in foreign policy and in times of crisis, especially Bush after 9/11 and how he was allowed to increase the size and strength of the fed bureau. with Homeland Security(imperial presidency), and how Nixon was strong in the domestic arena and how he used the federal bureaucracy against his enemies.

    I thought it was a lovely paper. Is there anything I have got wrong or could have added?
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    paper was alright, did constitution and the executive but i think the 30 marker on the constitution was wayyy too many things to address at once (separation of powers AND checks and balances AND if US government is or is not limited) so ****ed that one up a bit
 
 
 
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