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    I've study a health science foundation year (this year) and I'm looking to going through clearing for the health science audiology degree. Problem is I haven't done physics before.

    How intense is the degree? and what routes are you all taking as I'm aware there are different routes into specialising

    thanks
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    (Original post by lovinglife96)
    I've study a health science foundation year (this year) and I'm looking to going through clearing for the health science audiology degree. Problem is I haven't done physics before.

    How intense is the degree? and what routes are you all taking as I'm aware there are different routes into specialising

    thanks
    You should find the BSc OK, I think. (There is a one year from scratch MSc Audiology course for people who have done another degree that is *really* intense though!)

    I'm at the end of my first year of Audiology at Southampton and really enjoying it. There was a physics module in the first year, but it was taught assuming only really basic physics knowledge and at a manageable level - the lecturer really went out of her way to make sure no-one was left behind and we're all learnt loads. The physics involved is really only what you need to understand other aspects of the course and there are various textbooks that support the work, quizzes to self test, etc. (This will vary at other unis, although the basis of the course will be the same.) Don't let the physics put you off!

    The lecturers at Southampton are also really good at being available for questions and support if you are struggling to understand something.

    I'm doing the BSc then hope to work as an audiologist (adult rehabilitation mostly) in the NHS. Other people may do a 4th year to get the MSc. There's also the very competitive STP programme if you want to become a clinical scientist. You'll probably have seen this https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...ests-audiology about working as an audiologist in the NHS. Some people will choose to work in the private sector.
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    What A levels do you do?

    And out of interest what subject have you applied to so far that your thinking of leaving for audiology?
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    What uni are you thinking of applying to?


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    (Original post by lovinglife96)
    I've study a health science foundation year (this year) and I'm looking to going through clearing for the health science audiology degree. Problem is I haven't done physics before.

    How intense is the degree? and what routes are you all taking as I'm aware there are different routes into specialising

    thanks
    I've just done the first year of my Audiology course and I'd say the first year at least is not too demanding at all. Most unis expect a 'C' grade for GCSE physics, but when the physics module begins, you are not expected to have a great knowledge of physics but more so a basic grasp of GCSE maths, so you are eased into it well.

    A better grasp of A level biology does come in handy though as there is some work on the nervous system as well as ear anatomy and physiology. There is also an annoying basic biology module to do, which covers basic human biology.

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    (Original post by bibliboo)
    I've just done the first year of my Audiology course and I'd say the first year at least is not too demanding at all. Most unis expect a 'C' grade for GCSE physics, but when the physics module begins, you are not expected to have a great knowledge of physics but more so a basic grasp of GCSE maths, so you are eased into it well.

    A better grasp of A level biology does come in handy though as there is some work on the nervous system as well as ear anatomy and physiology. There is also an annoying basic biology module to do, which covers basic human biology.

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    I'm just about to graduate from Aston uni, whilst the course is challenging it helps to be organised and on top of your work load. Keeping up with deadlines and when to start revision for exams etc really helps and could be the difference between classifications. I would also recommend using text books available in your library- this seems like an obvious statement but many people on my course did not take advantage of the material available and thus did not gain enough scope and information around certain topics for the modules
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    (Original post by Mayeclv)
    I'm just about to graduate from Aston uni, whilst the course is challenging it helps to be organised and on top of your work load. Keeping up with deadlines and when to start revision for exams etc really helps and could be the difference between classifications. I would also recommend using text books available in your library- this seems like an obvious statement but many people on my course did not take advantage of the material available and thus did not gain enough scope and information around certain topics for the modules
    Hey!
    Did you stay at Aston? And was is your audiology group tight nit, by that I mean are you guys close classmates/friends?
    Also did you have to do a lot of presentations?
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    (Original post by Emilycunningham)
    Hey!
    Did you stay at Aston? And was is your audiology group tight nit, by that I mean are you guys close classmates/friends?
    Also did you have to do a lot of presentations?
    No I didn't stay on campus as I was already from Birmingham but most of my friends lived on campus. There were about 25 or so on the course and then in final year we had about 15 foundation students join the course. It's difficult to become close as we're on placement for all of third year and throughout the other years we were on placement too and lectures were only say 3 days a week but you get as close as possible under the circumstances.

    We did a few presentations, some in groups and some as individuals
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    Hi, I've just graduated from Southampton Uni (audiology)

    Physics-wise - don't worry. I don't think there was anybody in our class that struggled. Our lecturer was awesome and always available for help. we only had physics in our first year. We used a bit of the knowledge in second year, and in third year not at all, so don't worry about the physics (Unless you want to do a physics-based dissertation).

    in terms of being a tight-nit group - YES!!!! There were only 12 of us and I love them all, they're great. Definitely some friends for life. Facebook chat group for the whole 3 years, christmas dinners, trips to Sprinkles Gelato etc. Just a lovely bunch of people.

    We perhaps did around 2 presentations per year. None of them were horrific, they were all approx 5-10 minutes, mostly group ones but we did one on our own. As someone who hates presentations, even I found them okay

    Group work was tough to be honest. But just the typical issues of trying to get everybody to pull their weight which you'd get on any course. There wasn't *too* much group work.

    In terms of intenseness, it was and it wasn't. I think a lot of it depends on your personality and how you respond to work demands. If you keep on top of stuff then particularly first year should be pretty straightforward. I think that the most stressful part is the amount of placement you have to do and how little break you get. For example, we started 4 months of Summer placement just 5 days after our last second year exam, and then we started our dissertation in September just 2 days after coming back. We had to finish our dissertation by January, along with another essay, and then leave for 5 months of placement just 2 days after submitting dissertation.This all meant that there was pretty much no break for the whole second and third year. I managed to survive this crazy schedule, but some found it very tough and weren't able to. They are still graduating, but next year instead (they've had extensions rather than repeating the year).

    As with pretty much every degree though, I would say that keeping on top of your work helps massively. However as a person that does everything last minute - I still survived and I have a job lined up to start in August (it was very easy to find a job)

    I would say that at Southampton, the lecturers go above and beyond to help. My dissertation supervisors were exceptional and all lecturers were willing to have meetings at short notice to discuss anything. Definitely a perk of being in a small class. I also had the opportunity to go to Jersey (channel islands) for my long placements which was really cool.

    Anyway, that's quite a ramble.... but I wrote a blog post about Audiology recently in case you'd like a read to see what it's like working on placement http://thewindinmysails.com/2016/04/...-is-what-i-do/
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    (Original post by Mayeclv)
    I'm just about to graduate from Aston uni, whilst the course is challenging it helps to be organised and on top of your work load. Keeping up with deadlines and when to start revision for exams etc really helps and could be the difference between classifications. I would also recommend using text books available in your library- this seems like an obvious statement but many people on my course did not take advantage of the material available and thus did not gain enough scope and information around certain topics for the modules



    Hi, I wanted to ask some questions about audiology as I'd like to do audiology in future at Aston Uni. Im in college right now, but we are told to do work experience, what work experience will be relevant to audiology?, What if I cant get work experience at a hospital? Is there any suitable place to get work experience related to audiology?
 
 
 
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