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    I've had a supply teacher for 4-5 months for Geography who was not qualified to teach and feel this is going to impact me very hard in my overall grade. However, if I do reasonably well in my other subjects will my uni take this into account?
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    (Original post by OrdinaryStudent)
    I've had a supply teacher for 4-5 months for Geography who was not qualified to teach and feel this is going to impact me very hard in my overall grade. However, if I do reasonably well in my other subjects will my uni take this into account?
    No, they won't.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4107247
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    That's the exam board's stance on extra marks, not unis.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    That's the exam board's stance on extra marks, not unis.
    Yes, it is. As that is the exam boards' stance, you will not find schools contacting the universities to tell them something that a) exam boards don't give any sympathy to and b) puts them in a bad light. Since any such information would only be given credence by universities if given to them by independent bodies (i.e. not the candidate themselves, for obvious reasons) then it isn't going to happen. The universities' view (as it is for the exam boards) would be that any deficiency could have been made up for by the candidate themselves or the school.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Yes, it is. As that is the exam boards' stance, you will not find schools contacting the universities to tell them something that a) exam boards don't give any sympathy to and b) puts them in a bad light. Since any such information would only be given credence by universities if given to them by independent bodies (i.e. not the candidate themselves, for obvious reasons) then it isn't going to happen. The universities' view (as it is for the exam boards) would be that any deficiency could have been made up for by the candidate themselves or the school.
    They can just apply to universities with extenuating circumstances, if a school couldn't provide them with a teacher. As extenuating circumstances cover teaching issues, or as Cambridge put it - "serious disruption to educational provision at school/college"
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    They can just apply to universities with extenuating circumstances, if a school couldn't provide them with a teacher. As extenuating circumstances cover teaching issues, or as Cambridge put it - "serious disruption to educational provision at school/college"
    The school has provided them with a teacher whom they clearly deem adequate. Any such mitigating circumstances claim must come via the school or referee. They are not going to do this for a situation they do not regard as being an issue. There are indeed circumstances where there may have been serious disruption to educational provision, and schools do indeed inform universities where this is so, but a lack-lustre member of staff is not one of them. OP cannot claim this as a mitigating circumstance without the backing of his school, because obviously any disenchanted student who is fearful of not having done well in his exams could say anything, and universities will not accept such claims unless they come from an independent body.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    The school has provided them with a teacher whom they clearly deem adequate. Any such mitigating circumstances claim must come via the school or referee. They are not going to do this for a situation they do not regard as being an issue. There are indeed circumstances where there may have been serious disruption to educational provision, and schools do indeed inform universities where this is so, but a lack-lustre member of staff is not one of them. OP cannot claim this as a mitigating circumstance without the backing of his school, because obviously any disenchanted student who is fearful of not having done well in his exams could say anything, and universities will not accept such claims unless they come from an independent body.
    If the teacher, as said in the OP, is genuinely unqualified - I think there's a difference between adequate and suitable. It all depends on their actual qualifications and experience. If they can teach up to GCSE, there probably wouldn't be a case. But if the school just gave them a teacher to supervise, which is possible, I'm sure the school would help.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    If the teacher, as said in the OP, is genuinely unqualified - I think there's a difference between adequate and suitable. It all depends on their actual qualifications and experience. If they can teach up to GCSE, there probably wouldn't be a case. But if the school just gave them a teacher to supervise, which is possible, I'm sure the school would help.
    I do not know how OP knows they are unqualified. I think it is extremely unlikely to be the case. In the UK, a teacher who holds QTS (qualified teacher status) is qualified to teach students, not a subject. If you hold QTS, you can be employed to teach any subject the head teacher requires you to teach, whatever your qualifications. It may well be that this teacher does not have a qualification to teach geography, but that is not grounds for regarding them as unqualified. Unless they do not hold QTS at all, then the school is legally entitled to deploy them to teach whatever subject there is a shortage of. If they do not hold QTS, then they are not legally allowed to be employed in state schools, and I doubt very much that this is the case here. That is not the case in private schools, but in that case, there is no case to answer about them being unqualified.

    If this school has used a teacher without geography knowledge to teach the class, then they will have done so knowingly, and although it is unfortunate for the class, it is not grounds for a complaint which will hold any weight with a university. It is perfectly legal for them to do so, and not all that out of the ordinary. I have worked with many colleagues who have been roped into teaching a subject they have no experience in because there is a shortfall in the timetable. In my first year of teaching, I was made to teach French against my will, despite having only got an A level in it.
 
 
 
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