B997 – International Industrial Health and Safety Bill 2016

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B997 – International Industrial Health and Safety Bill 2016, TSR Socialist Party
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International Industrial Health and Safety Bill 2016

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—


1. The contents of this act is applicable to firms and companies, hereafter referred to as 'relevant firms and companies', that fulfil the following criteria:

(1) The firm or company in question is registered in the UK.

(2) The firm or company in question owns or deals with industrial or commercial sites and/or institutions - which may include (but are not exclusive to) factories, branches, distributors and/or suppliers - in a foreign country.

2. All relevant firms and companies are required to ensure to the best of their abilities that any industrial or commercial site abroad which houses employees is held to at least the same minimum standard of employee health and safety measures as in the United Kingdom.

(1) The 'minimum standard of employee safety measures' is the standard set through following the guidelines provided by the Government's Health and Safety Executive.

(2) All relevant firms and companies are expected to respect local laws and measures with regard to health and safety: in countries where the local health and safety laws contain measures not included in the Health and Safety Executive's guidelines, the latter shall be regarded only as a minimum setting of standard and never as a full replacement for local laws.

(3) In any case where the local laws of a country conflict with specific guidelines laid out by the Health and Safety Executive, the former always takes precedence and is to be adhered to by relevant firms and companies.

3. All relevant firms and companies are required to ensure to the best of their abilities that all partner factories, branches, distributors and suppliers in foreign countries are made aware of this requirement of minimum health and safety standards, and that all employees working with or under any of the above are made aware of the same.

4. The primary point of reference for ensuring that the measures mentioned by this act are being adhered to is the Embassy or Consulate of the United Kingdom in the relevant country.

(1) The United Kingdom's Embassy or Consulate maintains a list of all relevant firms and companies for that country, and releases this list to the public at least once a year; this release may be made through the British Broadcasting Corporation or via local government and/or organisations.

(2) Along with the list of relevant firms and companies (mentioned in 4 (i)), the Embassy or Consulate of the United Kingdom releases: a brief summary of the health and safety requirements laid out by the Health and Safety Executive, a notice of the requirement of all relevant firms and companies to uphold these requirements, and a set of instructions on how to contact the Embassy or Consulate in case a breach of these measures is observed, in both English and the local language (where relevant) at least once a year to the public.

(3) Reports of a breach of the measures laid out in this act from any source may be registered with the United Kingdom's Embassy or Consulate in the relevant country directly, through the relevant website or via a hotline set up wherever possible.

5. Any proven breach of the measures laid out in this act are met with an immediate revocation of the license to practice in the United Kingdom of the relevant firm or company in question, and this blacklisting is upheld until and unless suitable rectification is made and proven.

6. Enactment and extent
(1) This Act shall come into force on 1st July 2016.
(2) This Act shall extend to the whole of the United Kingdom.

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Recognising and lamenting the tragedies of the industrial building collapses in recent years, such as the accident in April 2013 which killed more than 380 people in Bangladesh, the House commits itself to contributing to efforts to ensure that an event like this does not recur. While it would neither be plausible nor desirable for the British Government to manage every aspect of any activity happening abroad, the House believes that it would be in the spirit of international co-operation and community to necessitate the assumption of some responsibility by British companies and firms involved abroad for the well-being of workers directly or indirectly under their employment, and seeks through this bill to do just that.

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Jammy Duel
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I thought the Socialists would want to protect these sectors rather than help them collapse. No
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Life_peer
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Is this an essay?
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username1899909
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Quite an interesting bill
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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by Life_peer)
Is this an essay?
It merely illustrates the higher standards us socialists hold ourselves to, rather than the three-line Bills the rest of the House is often happy to release.
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(Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
It merely illustrates the higher standards us socialists hold ourselves to, rather than the three-line Bills the rest of the House is often happy to release.
Then you should start by having a look at some actual bills and compare their legibility.
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(Original post by Life_peer)
Then you should start by having a look at some actual bills and compare their legibility.
Yeah, believe it or not, I've read a few. If you're objecting to the length of some sections, check the Companies Act.
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No, when companies operate abroad, the companies operate to the local laws in that country, forcing British companies to operate to British laws abroad will create bureaucracy for British posts abroad, and is impractical. The approach should be to put political pressure on foreign countries forcing foreign countries to improve the standards expected in that country; policing the world will not work.
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GaelicBolshevik
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Aye - obviously.
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barnetlad
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I think the intent is good, though closing down half the so called fashion retailers in the UK such as Primark would be a start. However, Philip Green#s business were registered abroad (?) so would they be exempt?
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Abstain.

I don't really agree with this bill however i'm not bothered enough to oppose the will of parliament and this may help bring back a degree of manufacturing since your pushing up production costs abroad. (though i'm surprised your prepared to impoverish the Africans). .
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tengentoppa
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It's not for us to intrude on the health and safety regulations of foreign countries.

If workers in foreign countries want better health and safety regulations then they can lobby their own governments. Ours is not to pontificate in this manner, and our health and safety regulations exist to protect workers in this country, not to promote some socialist fetish of proletarian internationalism.

Section 3 is unclear. Are suppliers, distributors etc. also to be held to the same standard? Because subjecting foreign companies with no attachment to the UK to this standard would obviously be unenforceable.
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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by tengentoppa)
It's not for us to intrude on the health and safety regulations of foreign countries.

If workers in foreign countries want better health and safety regulations then they can lobby their own governments. Ours is not to pontificate in this manner, and our health and safety regulations exist to protect workers in this country, not to promote some socialist fetish of proletarian internationalism.

Section 3 is unclear. Are suppliers, distributors etc. also to be held to the same standard? Because subjecting foreign companies with no attachment to the UK to this standard would obviously be unenforceable.
Section 3 is a requirement imposed on 'relevant companies' as defined in s1.

Also, this doesn't intrude on regulations of foreign countries, merely requires UK companies to apply the standards that we obviously feel reasonable for humanity globally.
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Abstain.

I don't really agree with this bill however i'm not bothered enough to oppose the will of parliament and this may help bring back a degree of manufacturing since your pushing up production costs abroad. (though i'm surprised your prepared to impoverish the Africans). .
You are missing a big impact, the manufacturing costs abroad will be pushed up for British companies but not foreign companies. British companies will have an incentive to manufacture in Britain but the competitiveness of British companies will be reduced, foreign companies exploiting the cheaper costs of production abroad can sell to other countries at a cheaper price, sell products in Britain at a cheaper price by undercut rival British companies who have a higher cost, forcing British companies out of the market.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
You are missing a big impact, the manufacturing costs abroad will be pushed up for British companies but not foreign companies. British companies will have an incentive to manufacture in Britain but the competitiveness of British companies will be reduced, foreign companies exploiting the cheaper costs of production abroad can sell to other countries at a cheaper price, sell products in Britain at a cheaper price by undercut rival British companies who have a higher cost, and force British companies out of the market.
Your right. 1.1 creates an uneven playing field and would also potentially cost us corporation tax. .

This is a Nay.
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There are obvious good moral attributes this bill is trying to instill into British companies. The way in which this bill is written, theoretically I believe, standards will begin to improve standards in these affected companies.

However, this bill doesn't take into account, the negative impact that this bill would have in the UK and these affected countries. Firstly, as Nigel Farage mentioned, by targeting British companies alone, who have to compete with larger foreign companies with less regulation, or government oversight, these British companies will have to raise their prices in order to turn a profit, whilst foreign companies can keep them low, and continue keep their profits. This will result in more UK money leaving the UK, less profitable British companies cutting loses, thus cutting jobs in the UK. They'll have to force the partners to cut costs, so if they're raising H&S standards, they have to cut labour. Basically summed up by Rakas, impoverishing the economies of these countries.

Even though, this would bolster the 'UK brand', in terms of fair treatment for all employees, foreign competitors won't follow our example, they'll continue in their cost cutting practices, whilst attracting investors away from British companies, because they can offer better returns.

tl;dr Nay.
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Tanqueray91
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No. Different countries abroad operate differently, and this could impose unnecessary costs on firms.
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That Bearded Man
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On the fence, overall I think national regulations should override British ones, so to promote business my gut would be Nay.

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TheDefiniteArticle
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(Original post by That Bearded Man)
On the fence, overall I think national regulations should override British ones, so to promote business my gut would be Nay.

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If we have regulations in the UK, it's clearly because we feel they are necessary to promote sufficient standards of health and safety, without which work would be dangerous. Why should we cause human beings to be exposed to industrial danger simply because they are not in our country, given there is no question of the UK exceeding its own sovereignty here?
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This bill is in cessation.
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