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Why is it an issue that EU laws take precedent over national laws? watch

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    Are you "Brexiters" happy to throw away your employment rights, your protection from discrimination in the workplace and your consumer protection for the sake of mindless patriotism?
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    Yawn.

    All these rights are enshrined in UK law,
    to a higher degree than EU law,
    if they were scrapped, that government wouldn't be reelected,
    and the new government would replace them.

    Why do you insist on trotting out tired, defeated 'arguments'?
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    (Original post by EuanF)
    Yawn.

    All these rights are enshrined in UK law,
    to a higher degree than EU law,
    if they were scrapped, that government wouldn't be reelected,
    and the new government would replace them.

    Why do you insist on trotting out tired, defeated 'arguments'?
    You tell him cuz I cannot be bothered
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    (Original post by EuanF)
    Yawn.

    All these rights are enshrined in UK law,
    to a higher degree than EU law,
    if they were scrapped, that government wouldn't be reelected,
    and the new government would replace them.

    Why do you insist on trotting out tired, defeated 'arguments'?
    You seem unaware that the UK had no choice but to enshrine these rights into her legal system as a direct result of being a member of the EU.

    If they were scrapped the government would have a few years left to do more damage, and there would be next to nothing we could do about it. The Right are always mouthing about how content they are with throwing their rights away....until it actually happens.
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    Leaving the EU does mean tearing up all EU laws. If you wish to preserve these laws then simply vote for a MP who believes in them or even better, join a party and select an MP who believes in these things.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Leaving the EU does mean tearing up all EU laws. If you wish to preserve these laws then simply vote for a MP who believes in them or even better, join a party and select an MP who believes in these things.
    Yeah... unfortunately we have a Tory government at the moment. Not who I'd be first to trust with employment rights.

    Last year, when they were busy making it harder for people to bring cases against their employer, they had a go at removing protections for victims of discrimination. On at least one of the proposals, it was EU measures which stopped them.

    The fact is that the EU gave UK workers some of the very important the rights they now enjoy. Very often, this was in the face of much resistance from the UK government.

    I'd also point out that if we left the EU and repealed the European Communities Act, then all laws made under that act are repealed unless there's an express provision otherwise. That means that Parliament has to re-legislate.
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    Is it an issue that your neighbor can trample over your property and decide what you can do in your property?
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    You seem unaware that the UK had no choice but to enshrine these rights into her legal system as a direct result of being a member of the EU.
    Well, UK Governments did agree with them. It's not like we oppose these rights: on the contrary, we agreed to the EU legislating on them.

    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Yeah... unfortunately we have a Tory government at the moment. Not who I'd be first to trust with employment rights.
    Perhaps not, but if the people choose to elect a government with a view on something, that's really fair enough. I'd also point out that the EU has been run by a centre-right administration uninterruptedly since 1999.

    I'm a Remain supporter, I see the benefit in harmonising employment rights and creating a free trade area with common regulation. I have no issue with legislative primacy of EU law over domestic law. But you can hardly suggest the EU should take some sort of role as protector of the people against the democratically elected British government - particularly in a system where member-state governments play a huge role.
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    (Original post by AntisthenesDogger)
    Is it an issue that your neighbor can trample over your property and decide what you can do in your property?
    The EU is not a person, nor is Britain. They are political entities. They are not your neighbour, they are - if we stretch the crap analogy - a county councillor. They both exercise authority over millions of people. If any of them are trampling on your property, it makes very little difference which one it is.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Well, UK Governments did agree with them. It's not like we oppose these rights: on the contrary, we agreed to the EU legislating on them.
    I wouldn't go that far. When it came to paid holiday leave, for example, the UK fought tooth and nail against the EU.

    (Original post by L i b)
    But you can hardly suggest the EU should take some sort of role as protector of the people against the democratically elected British government - particularly in a system where member-state governments play a huge role.
    I'm not sure I totally agree.

    I think that the EU ought to have 'the people' in its mind. And it should protect them. Not necessarily against the British government - but it should seek to advance their rights.

    Now this might mean that the EU frustrates the will of a democratically elected government. However that's not always a bad thing - democratically elected governments aren't infallible. I think it is a good thing to have third parties keeping a check on what the government does. Whether that be the courts through judicial review or a body the UK signs up to (such as the EU).

    I can understand why people would find this unappetising. And I guess the reason I'm so ****-a-hoop about it is because it happens to align to many of my values.
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    The EU tried to introduce a law to reduce air pollution deaths and our government blocked it.

    So we have lots of power in the EU, and that's not a good thing.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    You seem unaware that the UK had no choice but to enshrine these rights into her legal system as a direct result of being a member of the EU.

    If they were scrapped the government would have a few years left to do more damage, and there would be next to nothing we could do about it. The Right are always mouthing about how content they are with throwing their rights away....until it actually happens.
    Which is why so many of the things the remain campaign likes lying about were enshrined before the EU dictated they should be, why our governments, including Conservative governments, have played major roles in drafting a few of the pieces (most significantly the ECHR under a Tory government, admittedly not an EU thing), and why in many areas we have much better rights than those mandated, and many that are not mandated.

    If a Tory government wanted to get rid of these rights they would already have been watered down to the minimum, but they haven't. The reason they haven't, IF we do make the assumption that they ideally would, is this thing called the electorate. If ANY government did what people allege the Tories will do they could kiss goodbye to government, not to mention that so many backbenchers would rebel because they would lose their seats so the stuff wouldn't pass, and then those backbenchers would launch a vote of no confidence in the leader.

    Anybody that suggests that so many rights are protected from the Tories by the EU is seriously lacking in common sense.

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