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    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/fo...ermany-n592951

    "It disturbs me deeply that I was part of such a criminal organization," he told the court in April. "I am ashamed that I saw injustice and never did anything about it and I apologize for my actions."
    During the four-month trial in northern Germany, several Holocaust survivors gave harrowing testimonies of the horrors they faced at the death camp.


    Holocaust survivors and Jewish organizations quickly hailed the verdict, with World Jewish Congress President Ronald Lauder saying Hanning "got the sentence he deserved."

    What a joke, he's 94 - Will probably die in the next 5 years, literally no need to do this.
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    Honestly got to say it does seem like there's little point, he's now publicly apologized...I get it's not enough for many but I'd just let it go, he's had it on his conscience his whole life, he's 94...he's basically done.

    In general I think it's very easy for people to want to string up the security guard, the guy who sorted the mail etc, i.e. people that may not have been fully aware of what exactly was going on or buried their heads in the sand at camps like this, but at that time a lot of people will have just wanted to not think about it and not make trouble. After all if you turned around and said I won't kill these people they're our equals, you'd soon find yourself gassed alongside them. Now yes it is cowardly to say/do nothing, but I guarantee that if our government started doing something which was partially covered up at first but horrific and whispers were going around, a lot of people in public sector jobs that had a degree of involvement in it, directly or indirectly, wouldn't rally against it, they'd do their jobs with a heavy conscious and talk about their worries between themselves. Very few are brave enough to stand up when they're likely to be executed for it and the country is on a war footing.

    Bit like with ISIS now, there will be many Muslims in areas they control who do not agree with their extreme acts of violence, burning people alive in cages, keeping sex slaves etc. But they know if they speak out they'll be beheaded in the town square, so they'll keep quiet, keep their heads down, they might even come and join a crowd watching a gay man being thrown from a roof, because they think if they keep staying away their neighbors who do support IS will whisper about their allegiances, and talk gets you killed.

    This isn't meant to be apologetics for those involved in a genocide, it's just not as simple as folks make out at times.
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    Put in prison at 94?!
    I personally would not care a bit if I was in his shoes
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    tbh he will be comfortable in jail... it will not be like a moldy dungeon. certainly better accommodation than for the people in Auschwitz.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    tbh he will be comfortable in jail... it will not be like a moldy dungeon. certainly better accommodation than for the people in Auschwitz.
    While I agree he will be comfortable, you have to remember he was just a guard. Does he really deserve essentially going to jail for the remainder of his life because he did his job. If he were to not do said job he would have been reprimanded - possibly even shot. It's hardly fair to punish him this late in life.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    While I agree he will be comfortable, you have to remember he was just a guard. Does he really deserve essentially going to jail for the remainder of his life because he did his job. If he were to not do said job he would have been reprimanded - possibly even shot. It's hardly fair to punish him this late in life.
    he should serve his sentence in comfort and dignity. qualities which were denied to the millions who perished in the camps.
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    I repped you for making this thread, but I thoroughly disagree with the sentiment that he should be pardoned on account of his age. The most extreme criminals, that is those who commit genocide and crimes against humanity should never be allowed to escape justice.
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    (Original post by joey11223)

    In general I think it's very easy for people to want to string up the security guard, the guy who sorted the mail etc, i.e. people that may not have been fully aware of what exactly was going on or buried their heads in the sand at camps like this, but at that time a lot of people will have just wanted to not think about it and not make trouble. After all if you turned around and said I won't kill these people they're our equals, you'd soon find yourself gassed alongside them. Now yes it is cowardly to say/do nothing, but I guarantee that if our government started doing something which was partially covered up at first but horrific and whispers were going around, a lot of people in public sector jobs that had a degree of involvement in it, directly or indirectly, wouldn't rally against it, they'd do their jobs with a heavy conscious and talk about their worries between themselves. Very few are brave enough to stand up when they're likely to be executed for it and the country is on a war footing.
    He was at the camp, as a guard. He clearly knew what was going on, it's not as if he was a frontline Wehrmacht soldier who was just part of the fight. He should have just gone home one night and ran away with his family.
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    (Original post by Daddy Longlegz)
    I repped you for making this thread, but I thoroughly disagree with the sentiment that he should be pardoned on account of his age. The most extreme criminals, that is those who commit genocide and crimes against humanity should never be allowed to escape justice.
    I'll c/p what I said before

    you have to remember he was just a guard. Does he really deserve essentially going to jail for the remainder of his life because he did his job. If he were to not do said job he would have been reprimanded - possibly even shot. It's hardly fair to punish him this late in life.

    Although I do agree with you, that is those who commit genocide and crimes against humanity should never be allowed to escape justice. I guess I'm on the fence on saying definitively whether he committed genocide. He was certainly part of it but it wasn't his idea, while [I assume] he put them in gas chambers, like I said before he HAD to do that, he had no choice.

    I'm defiantly in minority on this one, everyone I have spoke to about this has said he committed genocide.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    I'll c/p what I said before

    you have to remember he was just a guard. Does he really deserve essentially going to jail for the remainder of his life because he did his job. If he were to not do said job he would have been reprimanded - possibly even shot. It's hardly fair to punish him this late in life.

    Although I do agree with you, that is those who commit genocide and crimes against humanity should never be allowed to escape justice. I guess I'm on the fence on saying definitively whether he committed genocide. He was certainly part of it but it wasn't his idea, while [I assume] he put them in gas chambers, like I said before he HAD to do that, he had no choice.

    I'm defiantly in minority on this one, everyone I have spoke to about this has said he committed genocide.
    Claiming that he should be allowed to get away with it because he would have been shot is absurd. Poor people commit criminal acts, not because they are innately bad, but out of the desperation of poverty yet they're still penalised by the justice system. When the Nazis decided to carry out the so called final solution, they were clearly losing, it was an act of Nazi desperation, he could easily have gone missing or defected. Some German soldiers ended up marching to allied lines and surrendering at the very end.
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    Guilty of being the enemy 70 years later.

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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    Guilty of committing a crime (or actually not doing anything to stop it, being an accomplice), and being on the losing side

    Obviously the allies committed atrocities too - e.g. the Bengal famine, which the British did nothing to stop (and by the same logic makes them accomplices in the millions of deaths), and the vast majority of them have been forgotten, but we should not forget that he is guilty, and therefore should be tried
    History is written by the victors.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/fo...ermany-n592951

    "It disturbs me deeply that I was part of such a criminal organization," he told the court in April. "I am ashamed that I saw injustice and never did anything about it and I apologize for my actions."
    During the four-month trial in northern Germany, several Holocaust survivors gave harrowing testimonies of the horrors they faced at the death camp.


    Holocaust survivors and Jewish organizations quickly hailed the verdict, with World Jewish Congress President Ronald Lauder saying Hanning "got the sentence he deserved."

    What a joke, he's 94 - Will probably die in the next 5 years, literally no need to do this.
    World war 2, wasn't that like 100 years ago?

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    (Original post by Esoteric.)
    World war 2, wasn't that like 100 years ago?

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    Well no because the guard on trial is 94, and something tells me he didn't fight when he was of age -6

    WW2 started in 1939 so it's like 77 years ago.
 
 
 
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