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How to do well in education despite depression Watch

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    I had my last exam today and I'll be going to uni in September.

    It went pretty badly. I've done well in past papers but today, my brain was foggier than usual, I couldn't concentrate and I couldn't finish in time. I haven't met my potential due to my mental health issues. I know I'm smart and I hope to do a lot better at university than I've done at A2. I got high As in all my AS exams but I'll be lucky if I scrape Cs in any of the exams I've just done. I'm just feeling deflated, like I'm wasting my education.

    I'll make some lifestyle changes this summer. Eat healthily, exercise etc. I might consider antidepressants. I'll be asking for extra support at university. I think they offer extra time and extended deadlines and stuff. Other than that, what else can I do to make sure I do well?

    I can't take a gap year. I don't want to share the reasons why so please take my word for it.

    (sorry this is so badly written, I just don't have the energy to make it flow well..)
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    Go to the doctors and get diagnosed, then maybe you could inform your school of why you feel you may underperform and ask them to mention you mental health issues to your uni and the exam boards. Other than that I'm not sure, I hope you do well, you never know you might feel like you've underperformed but might surprise yourself on results day xx
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    Have you been officially diagnosed? I don't think you can get extra time etc from your uni unless you are. Have you considered applying for DSA?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I had my last exam today and I'll be going to uni in September.

    It went pretty badly. I've done well in past papers but today, my brain was foggier than usual, I couldn't concentrate and I couldn't finish in time. I haven't met my potential due to my mental health issues. I know I'm smart and I hope to do a lot better at university than I've done at A2. I got high As in all my AS exams but I'll be lucky if I scrape Cs in any of the exams I've just done. I'm just feeling deflated, like I'm wasting my education.

    I'll make some lifestyle changes this summer. Eat healthily, exercise etc. I might consider antidepressants. I'll be asking for extra support at university. I think they offer extra time and extended deadlines and stuff. Other than that, what else can I do to make sure I do well?

    I can't take a gap year. I don't want to share the reasons why so please take my word for it.

    (sorry this is so badly written, I just don't have the energy to make it flow well..)
    1) Treat the depression
    2) Apply for DSA and get support from uni
    3) Look into other options (you don't have to take them though)

    I'll give a little bit of advice here, but the best help you can get is from doctors, uni/ college (student support) and sities like mind.org so check all that out too. (I know you have said you do now want to/ can't take a gap year and that is fine. I may mention simmilar things, but just ignore them if they aren't an option for you.)

    The most important thing is to sort out the depression. This will involve seeing a doctor and discussing your symptoms then talking about and deciding on treatments (usually meds and/ or therapy). This will take a while so it's best to start soon so you can hopefully have sorted at least something before you get to uni. Summer holidays is a good time to work on depression (from experience) cos there's no uni or college to worry about.

    For support from uni you will need to apply for DSA. It's not that hard just needs a doctors note explaining your diagnosis, some time to process and a needs asessment in which you plan what support you will have. It's best to do this as soon as you know what uni you are going to so it will be sorted for when you get there. There are a few things they might do withot DSA (leway for being late to lectures etc), but mostt things (extra time etc) will need DSA to approve and pay for it. Your college will probably help you with this if you ask them.
    Things you could probably expect to get from DSA are some sort of allowance in exams (might just be a seperate room but could also include extra time), possible extensions for coursework, a support worker who you can meet with to discuss things with (work or private), possible help with costs if you have a need for it (like I got help with housing costs because my OCD meant sharing was too stressful for me and for traveling to placement because public transport made me anxious), learning materials (powerpoints) in advance. It depends on your personal needs so if you think something would elp ask about it in your asessment.

    Depression doesn't just go away overnight so things like lifestyle changes can help to keep you going while you work on the cause. Mind.org has some pretty dood advice on this. It also helps to read up on it and know what you are dealing with. Also try to work with it and realise your boundaries. Don't constantly get yourself down because you try to do things and can't. Know what you can currently do and try to gradually push your boundaries. If it makes you tired find how long you can stay up without getting tired and work with that instead of staying up for a whole day and then crashing for a week.
    A bit of routine is also good. Helps to manage things if you know what to expect.

    Depression is such a personal thing and nobody can tell you exactly what you need. You have to work out what's right for you. Reading up on it helps you to know what to keep in mind. Mind.org and sane.org are good places to start.

    If things get too much for you there is something called "leave of absence" which is basically medical leave. Your place at uni is saved and you can take time out to sort your health out. You can also applyfor things liek re-takes and extenuating circumstances. If academic work is just a bit too much you can look into part time courses or things liek internships. There is always an option.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Have you been officially diagnosed? I don't think you can get extra time etc from your uni unless you are. Have you considered applying for DSA?
    Yes I'm diagnosed and I'll be applying for DSA. I still need to fill in the form though
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yes I'm diagnosed and I'll be applying for DSA. I still need to fill in the form though
    Ah good. Do it asap so it can be confirmed and you can get a needs assessment done. :yep:
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    1) Treat the depression
    2) Apply for DSA and get support from uni
    3) Look into other options (you don't have to take them though)

    I'll give a little bit of advice here, but the best help you can get is from doctors, uni/ college (student support) and sities like mind.org so check all that out too. (I know you have said you do now want to/ can't take a gap year and that is fine. I may mention simmilar things, but just ignore them if they aren't an option for you.)

    The most important thing is to sort out the depression. This will involve seeing a doctor and discussing your symptoms then talking about and deciding on treatments (usually meds and/ or therapy). This will take a while so it's best to start soon so you can hopefully have sorted at least something before you get to uni. Summer holidays is a good time to work on depression (from experience) cos there's no uni or college to worry about.

    For support from uni you will need to apply for DSA. It's not that hard just needs a doctors note explaining your diagnosis, some time to process and a needs asessment in which you plan what support you will have. It's best to do this as soon as you know what uni you are going to so it will be sorted for when you get there. There are a few things they might do withot DSA (leway for being late to lectures etc), but mostt things (extra time etc) will need DSA to approve and pay for it. Your college will probably help you with this if you ask them.
    Things you could probably expect to get from DSA are some sort of allowance in exams (might just be a seperate room but could also include extra time), possible extensions for coursework, a support worker who you can meet with to discuss things with (work or private), possible help with costs if you have a need for it (like I got help with housing costs because my OCD meant sharing was too stressful for me and for traveling to placement because public transport made me anxious), learning materials (powerpoints) in advance. It depends on your personal needs so if you think something would elp ask about it in your asessment.

    Depression doesn't just go away overnight so things like lifestyle changes can help to keep you going while you work on the cause. Mind.org has some pretty dood advice on this. It also helps to read up on it and know what you are dealing with. Also try to work with it and realise your boundaries. Don't constantly get yourself down because you try to do things and can't. Know what you can currently do and try to gradually push your boundaries. If it makes you tired find how long you can stay up without getting tired and work with that instead of staying up for a whole day and then crashing for a week.
    A bit of routine is also good. Helps to manage things if you know what to expect.

    Depression is such a personal thing and nobody can tell you exactly what you need. You have to work out what's right for you. Reading up on it helps you to know what to keep in mind. Mind.org and sane.org are good places to start.

    If things get too much for you there is something called "leave of absence" which is basically medical leave. Your place at uni is saved and you can take time out to sort your health out. You can also applyfor things liek re-takes and extenuating circumstances. If academic work is just a bit too much you can look into part time courses or things liek internships. There is always an option.
    Thanks a lot! I'll be taking a note of these things.
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    Prioritise your mental health. I'd gotten a diagnosis of Aspergers and depression towards the end of year 11. I had therapy. I started going out and doing stuff - going to the gym, eating better, socialising more, stuff like that, and it really changed my life. I was motivated, energetic, and happy.

    Then as A levels started I dropped a lot of the positive changes I'd made. I stopped going to the gym, stopped volunteering, stopped socialising, and I was constantly exhausted because of getting up early for school. My mental health declined quite severely and has been ever since. It had a big impact on my A levels - a few months into the year each year, I'd just become depressed and stop working entirely, which you can't afford to do at A level and probably uni too. Now I'm at a point where my mental health seems irreparable and my A levels are ****ed.

    My advice is to stick with all the lifestyle changes you make, and make sure you go out regularly, meet people and enjoy yourself. Try to do new, productive and scary things, I found that helped me. It might seem like you should be sacrificing some of that to focus on your work, but if you do that it will impact your mental health and you'll end up much less productive in the long run. Speak to the disability people at your uni and see what they can do - they can probably give you allowances like extra time in your exams, and they might be more lenient with your attendance if you need to rest and recover.

    If you haven't already been diagnosed, get it done. Definitely try therapy (REALLY try - you need to work hard and believe it'll be effective for it to do anything, and although it doesn't work for everyone, it can genuinely change your life) and get a letter from your doctor stating your diagnosis and the treatment that you're currently undergoing. Send that to the admissions team at your uni ASAP - if it turns out on results day that you didn't get the grades, you'll be able to call the admissions team and speak to them about it. If they already have proof that your mental health affected your results, they'll take that into consideration. This is my plan right now, I'll be ringing them on results day and begging them to take pity on me :rofl:
 
 
 
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