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Will young people really be better off if we stayed in the EU? watch

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    A lot of young people seem to think that we will be better off if we remained in the EU. My facebook feed seems to be dominated by it at the moment. As a young person myself, I struggle to see how young people will be better off if we remain.

    As someone trying to get onto the property ladder it is almost impossible with prices rising as fast as they are. Immigration specifically doesn’t bother me. However, when the chancellor George Osbourne says that house prices will fall by 18% as an argument in favour of remaining, surely that can only be a good thing for young people. If a house price was previously £300,000 an 18% fall would put that at £246,000 – a £54,000 difference. It would take me (and the vast majority of young people) a long long time to save that amount normally.

    The leave campaign should be all over getting this message across as young people are typically pro-remain. Now I personally feel that the chancellor is scaremongering homeowners into how much house prices will fall. But even if house prices are flat over the next few years or even show a tiny increase that is surely got to be better than how it is today (prices rising by 10% meaning only the rich can get onto the property ladder).
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    (Original post by alsdk51)
    A lot of young people seem to think that we will be better off if we remained in the EU. My facebook feed seems to be dominated by it at the moment. As a young person myself, I struggle to see how young people will be better off if we remain.

    As someone trying to get onto the property ladder it is almost impossible with prices rising as fast as they are. Immigration specifically doesn’t bother me. However, when the chancellor George Osbourne says that house prices will fall by 18% as an argument in favour of remaining, surely that can only be a good thing for young people. If a house price was previously £300,000 an 18% fall would put that at £246,000 – a £54,000 difference. It would take me (and the vast majority of young people) a long long time to save that amount normally.

    The leave campaign should be all over getting this message across as young people are typically pro-remain. Now I personally feel that the chancellor is scaremongering homeowners into how much house prices will fall. But even if house prices are flat over the next few years or even show a tiny increase that is surely got to be better than how it is today (prices rising by 10% meaning only the rich can get onto the property ladder).
    I think the big earners will
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    Depends what you call 'young'

    For me, as an undecided, who believes we would be worse off in the short term outside the EU, but sees the potential to be better in the longterm, I would say No, young people would not be better off.

    My reason being that the 2 biggest things for young people: Ease of finding work, and University - are both things that will take big hits for the first few years after leaving.

    For universities, there is a reason why 9/10 staff members want to remain in.. although some may be enjoying the idea of charging all EU students international rates.. they are more scared of loosing student numbers, and mostly loosing research grants, that they hold no faith will be replicated by the UK goverment..

    For jobs, except the most hardcore OUT voters, most accept that there would be a difficult few years after leaving, before things 'maybe' pick up.. those few years are small and easy to negotiate for a middle-aged person with a lot of experiance and a stable job. But for a graduating student, (as many students who graduated in the middle of the last recession can tell you) if you graduate at the wrong time, and things dont go to plan, it can have quite a long-standing effect on your career.

    So for me, I can understand why young people would want to vote in, on a practical level.. as their lives are much more effected by short-term changes in the country, then older peoples lives are.

    However the thing is, I dont think that this is why many young people are voting in at all. When I talk to my younger friends, very few focus at all on the pratical effects to their life.. and just bleet on about what ever is trending, is the StatusQuo response at the moment.
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    Young people are way worse off within the EU.

    - Less starter jobs
    - Lower pay (graduate pay is on the decline 2k off)
    - Higher youth unemployment look at Spain, Greece etc. Even the UK.
    - Higher property prices and rent
    - More competition for places at university
    - Rising tuition fees due to demand and supply
    etc etc
 
 
 
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