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    Hi,
    Basically I've just sat my GCSE exams and in my opinion not all of them went so well - so I am a bit worried for results day -
    Anyways I have always wanted to study law preferably at Kings and am very worried that my GCSEs will affect any possibility of me getting into good schools like KCL, UCL or any of the others ( places like Oxbridge are obviously out of the question)
    In Alevels I plan to take History, Economics and Psychology as well as an EPQ and potentially the Critical Thinking. AT my school they said that 4 subjects was not compulsory because of changes to A levels
    So basically I just want to know what people think and to get any advice that could potentially improve my chances
    Thank you
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    Well, the truth of the matter is that we can't yet be certain what weighting universities will place on GCSEs given new 'A' level reforms, as nobody has yet applied under the new system. However, GCSEs are certainly not the be-all and end-all, and as is currently the case, I imagine that universities will be altogether more interested in your AS and (perhaps) EPQ grades if applicable, your GCSE grades in relevant subjects and your realistic predictions for 'A' level attainment than the C that you achieved in GCSE music.
    Obviously, without knowing what you mean by 'not all of them went so well', which not even you can know until August, it is difficult to give specific advice. I am conscious that many schools have different policies on how to treat the new 'A' levels and AS levels (whether to do four of the latter and then three of the former as default, or one AS and three full 'A' levels, or just three full ones), but if you think that you didn't do yourself justice at GCSE, you may wish to opt to do at least one AS level in Lower Sixth in addition to your three chosen 'A' level subjects, to show that you are academically capable. It is worth noting that Critical Thinking is all but worthless for top universities; do it if you want, not for the 'qualification' that it will grant you. The mileage of the EPQ varies, and it is worth looking up how various institutions treat it.
    Finally, once you have your grades, if they are lower than you were hoping for you may wish to contact the admissions departments of the institutions to which you intend to apply to ask them what else you could do to strengthen your application. They will usually be happy to offer advice, because they want good applicants just as much as you want to get into a good university. Your teachers should also be happy to offer you support if you ask.
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    (Original post by SosbanFach)
    Well, the truth of the matter is that we can't yet be certain what weighting universities will place on GCSEs given new 'A' level reforms, as nobody has yet applied under the new system. However, GCSEs are certainly not the be-all and end-all, and as is currently the case, I imagine that universities will be altogether more interested in your AS and (perhaps) EPQ grades if applicable, your GCSE grades in relevant subjects and your realistic predictions for 'A' level attainment than the C that you achieved in GCSE music.
    Obviously, without knowing what you mean by 'not all of them went so well', which not even you can know until August, it is difficult to give specific advice. I am conscious that many schools have different policies on how to treat the new 'A' levels and AS levels (whether to do four of the latter and then three of the former as default, or one AS and three full 'A' levels, or just three full ones), but if you think that you didn't do yourself justice at GCSE, you may wish to opt to do at least one AS level in Lower Sixth in addition to your three chosen 'A' level subjects, to show that you are academically capable. It is worth noting that Critical Thinking is all but worthless for top universities; do it if you want, not for the 'qualification' that it will grant you. The mileage of the EPQ varies, and it is worth looking up how various institutions treat it.
    Finally, once you have your grades, if they are lower than you were hoping for you may wish to contact the admissions departments of the institutions to which you intend to apply to ask them what else you could do to strengthen your application. They will usually be happy to offer advice, because they want good applicants just as much as you want to get into a good university. Your teachers should also be happy to offer you support if you ask.
    Thank you your right I will probably just have to wait till August before anything, I m not expecting them to be that bad anyway roughly A* TO C hopefully its just I was aiming for almost all A*
    And about the critical thinking I thought it counted as an AS?
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    (Original post by missn2000)
    Thank you your right I will probably just have to wait till August before anything, I m not expecting them to be that bad anyway roughly A* TO C hopefully its just I was aiming for almost all A*
    And about the critical thinking I thought it counted as an AS?
    You can do either AS or A level Critical Thinking, and in theory it counts as a full qualification. In practice, however, most good universities will pay Critical Thinking and General Studies no heed whatsoever in making their offers. To quote KCL on their Law LLB requirements page:
    General Studies and Critical Thinking - College policy: Please note that AS/A level General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted by King's as one of your A or AS levels. However, if offered the grade achieved may be taken into account when considering whether or not to accept a candidate who has just fallen short of the conditions of their offer.
    UCL are similar:
    A level Critical Thinking and A level General Studies do not meet UCL's A level entry requirements. An A level in either of these subjects can only count as meeting UCL's requirement for a fourth AS level subject. AS level Critical Thinking and General Studies do not meet any UCL entry requirement and are not acceptable for admission.
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    (Original post by SosbanFach)
    You can do either AS or A level Critical Thinking, and in theory it counts as a full qualification. In practice, however, most good universities will pay Critical Thinking and General Studies no heed whatsoever in making their offers. To quote KCL on their Law LLB requirements page:
    Oh okayy thank you !
 
 
 
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