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Am I just plain dopey or is there an issue here? watch

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    So to begin with, exam season is over (GCSEs) and I have noticed during my exams I have an issue with understanding questions. I'll have to read the same question at least 5 times to understand what it wants me to write about. The words just go straight over my head.

    I've never had any learning difficulties however. I've been placed in top sets pretty much for everything but this issue has come to my attention more recently. I just kind of accepted it and carried on with my exams.

    Now, however, yesterday evening I was at cadets. Being a senior rank I need to listen to what the officers were saying to me so I can do what they want me to do with the younger cadets; and I just failed to understand what they wanted me to do. This happened at least 4 times last night and I just stood there in embarrassment in front of my commanding officer asking him "I don't understand sir" or "Sorry sir, I've forgotten what you want me to do".

    So this is why I am here. I feel like they are linked. I can't follow and understand instructions and questions and it's starting to worry me now if there is an issue here.
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    I think you have lost concentration, that happens to me a lot of the time when im simply not in focus. I think because GCSE is over your focus has dissapeared. this is how ill be after my exams
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    Could it be that you are just lacking focus sometimes i.e. when you are reading a question or completing a task your thinking about something else?
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    Don't really know what to suggest, possibly see your GP if concerned?

    It's possible you were just struggling with stress/panic?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So to begin with, exam season is over (GCSEs) and I have noticed during my exams I have an issue with understanding questions. I'll have to read the same question at least 5 times to understand what it wants me to write about. The words just go straight over my head.

    I've never had any learning difficulties however. I've been placed in top sets pretty much for everything but this issue has come to my attention more recently. I just kind of accepted it and carried on with my exams.

    Now, however, yesterday evening I was at cadets. Being a senior rank I need to listen to what the officers were saying to me so I can do what they want me to do with the younger cadets; and I just failed to understand what they wanted me to do. This happened at least 4 times last night and I just stood there in embarrassment in front of my commanding officer asking him "I don't understand sir" or "Sorry sir, I've forgotten what you want me to do".

    So this is why I am here. I feel like they are linked. I can't follow and understand instructions and questions and it's starting to worry me now if there is an issue here.
    I was in high sets for most of school and always considered to be a good student, but when I came to Alevels I started having trouble and was diagnosed with dyslexia and ADD before uni. A lot of people with SEN (special educational needs) can still be smart and may even have a unique and good way of thinking, but may also have some issues with things too. For me it meant that I was good at picking up information in class and understanding ideas, but was less good at reading or remembering specific details (like dates). This meant I was fine through most of my education, but once reading became more necessary an I took courses that required me to remember specific details I started to have trouble. I also had issues with time management which wasn't an issue at school cos we didn't get much homework, but in college and uni independant work became difficult.
    What i'm trying to get across there is that just because you are smart or have never noticed issues before it doesn't mean it isn't possible. A lot of people with SEN are actually diagnosed as adults.

    It is entirely possible that you are a bit stressed and overworked so your brain isn't working as well right now. Try to make sure you are eating and drinking well too as dehydration or low nutrients can cause your brain to slow.
    It might be worth seeing a doctor and asking if the think it is worth looking into anything. There are both SEN and normal medical causes for this sort of thing. Things like ADD/ ADHD and vitamin deficiencies or dehydration spring to mind for me, but there are more. It is also possible that it is due to stress or another simmilar mental health problem, which is common around this time.

    Are you noticing any other signs like being a bit more clumsy or disorientated or being tired or worn out? If so it is another sign that a doctor could be the way to go.

    I know it can be quite awkward to go see a doctor when you aren't really sure if anything is wrong so here's a bit of advice on what you could expect and what might help you prepare:
    For your appointment, think about anything you have noticed that seems a bit off and write it down. Also write down any questions you would like answered. It helps to have this just so you don't forget especially if a lot of things seem small and you aren't sure if they are relevant.
    Read up on your symptoms on NHS website or any other sites to see what might be relevant, but don't get too worried about any potential causes especially ones that sound really bad. It's better to see a doctor and find out if its a possibility before freaking out over it.

    If you are concerned about SEN then looking at some online resources or even "do I have __" quizes could help you think a bit more about it and what other signs you might have. (The quizes are by no means a diagnostic tool but tend to list symptoms in an understandable way if they are a decent one). If you would loke to know if you do have SEN you would need to go see a doctor and get a referal to an educational psychiatrist who will do some tests (mostly just questions) to see if you do. If you do have SEN and a diagnosis you are eligable for DSA so it's worth doing if you think it's possible
    Other MH concerns are again see a doctor and maybe get a referal to a psych (given your age you would probably be referred to CAMHS for anything like that or SEN instead of an "adult" psych).
    Anything "normal" medical you will probably be dealt with at your surgery and maybe have a few things like blood tests done to see if there is any cause.


    What I have said may sound like jumping to conclusion or blowing things up but you souns worried so i'm trying to cover the bases. I started off feeling like that and it turned into SEN and a thyroid disorder diagnosis so you never know. Chances are it's just you feeling a bit off due to all the pressure of exams and stuff. You may want to give yourself a couple of weeks to see how things go and think about if you have any other signs of anything before getting all worried and seeing a doctor.
 
 
 
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