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    I've never heard of FY1s in Neurology. It may well be Stroke. If it's not and genuinely is working in a tertiary Neurology ward then don't panic (well, don't panic regardless). It's a VERY top heavy speciality with decisions made mostly by consultants and registrars with juniors (almost always core medical trainees) sat in front of a computer ordering a bunch of investigations and wondering what the **** the NMDA receptor is and why no one mentioned it at medical school. Neurologists are strange creatures and inpatient neurology - especially in a tertiary centre - is different to some medical wards and involved with patients who are often complex, without a diagnosis, having huge amounts of investigations and physiologically "well" (obs wise, generally). If it really is a neurology rotation brush up on your examination skills and basic anatomy (function + anatomy of cranial nerves, spinal cord ascending/descending tracts, organisation of PNS...)and you'll be in a better position than most doctors in the hospital. Most people do not get any exposure to inpatient neurology and are terrified by it even as registrars so make the most of it as a learning experience. Learnt to take a focussed history and examination, learn to use a tendon hammer, learn about common neurological complaints (funny turns, headaches, seizures, LOC, sensory symptoms) and how to put a clinical assessment of a patient into pragmatic management plans. You will get to do Lumbar punctures so maybe spend half an hour reading up about the anatomy.

    In terms of general medicine - there are lots of posts every June/July about people being worried. It's natural and part of the learning curve. Starting on medicine is best IMO as you get thrown into the deep end generally. Learn to be organised, know your medical emergencies, know when to ask for help and work with your peers as a team. Important to attend shadowing and work out what your day to day roles are, how the rota is organised, how investigations are ordered etc.
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    (Original post by fishfacesimpson)
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    Thanks for the reply, very helpful.
    This is on Jersey, so small DGH, not large tertiary center! I hear that it is quite an intense place to work because of a relative lack of middle-grade staff.
    From what little information I have it is general medicine, but I would be looking after the neuro team's patients during the day, and clerking neuro patients in when my team is on call.
    I'll brush up on my emergencies and neuro knowledge before I start then.
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    (Original post by stroppyninja)
    Thanks for the reply, very helpful.
    This is on Jersey, so small DGH, not large tertiary center! I hear that it is quite an intense place to work because of a relative lack of middle-grade staff.
    From what little information I have it is general medicine, but I would be looking after the neuro team's patients during the day, and clerking neuro patients in when my team is on call.
    I'll brush up on my emergencies and neuro knowledge before I start then.
    I did my elective (well half of it) on that specific team in Jersey and I think they had one actual neuro patient? The rest were all general med, and when you're clerking, it's any new admission, not just neuro ones (otherwise you would have nothing to do 99% of the time). I was really worried about doing my elective in neuro as I don't like it and my knowledge is also ropey, but it was never an issue. Granted it was only for 4 weeks, but I genuinely wouldn't worry about neuro. I would focus on common general medical conditions and their management.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    I did my elective (well half of it) on that specific team in Jersey and I think they had one actual neuro patient? The rest were all general med, and when you're clerking, it's any new admission, not just neuro ones (otherwise you would have nothing to do 99% of the time). I was really worried about doing my elective in neuro as I don't like it and my knowledge is also ropey, but it was never an issue. Granted it was only for 4 weeks, but I genuinely wouldn't worry about neuro. I would focus on common general medical conditions and their management.
    Brilliant, it's great to hear from someone who has actually been there! I did think it a bit strange to have an F1 just for neuro. Any other surprises about Jersey / Jersey hospital I should look out for?
 
 
 
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