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    I am currently finishing a nursing degree program and planning to apply to medicine when I'm finished (after a year of work) I would love to hear from another who has made the transition! Any info about interviews, personal statements and about why you wanted to change paths. Also about why you didn't choose to become a nurse specialist instead.

    Thanks!!
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    You haven't even started the job yet and you've already decided the grass is greener? :p:
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    ForestCat
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    (Original post by SunRiseAtDawn)
    I am currently finishing a nursing degree program and planning to apply to medicine when I'm finished (after a year of work) I would love to hear from another who has made the transition! Any info about interviews, personal statements and about why you wanted to change paths. Also about why you didn't choose to become a nurse specialist instead.

    Thanks!!
    I think the more important thing is why do you want to make the switch. Why don't you want to be a specialist nurse?
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You haven't even started the job yet and you've already decided the grass is greener? :p:
    I've been a nursing assistant for 4 years now and have done work experience with many doctors in A&E/ clinics/wards. In no way am I saying the grass is greener. Both nursing and medicine are hard work! But I made the wrong degree decision and I have very right to want to swap. But unfortunately there are difficulties thanks to a lot of stigmas attached to the change. I would actually like to heard from someone with helpful advice but thanks for your comment anyway.

    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I think the more important thing is why do you want to make the switch. Why don't you want to be a specialist nurse?
    Thanks, I do know why I want to swap, I wouldn't be making the transition if I didn't. But I've never met anyone who has done it before but what Ive heard is that it's quite difficult. That's why I was just wondering if there's anyone out there who has. To share advice or give me some hope that it's possible haha. Thanks though
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    (Original post by SunRiseAtDawn)
    I've been a nursing assistant for 4 years now and have done work experience with many doctors in A&E/ clinics/wards. In no way am I saying the grass is greener. Both nursing and medicine are hard work! But I made the wrong degree decision and I have very right to want to swap. But unfortunately there are difficulties thanks to a lot of stigmas attached to the change. I would actually like to heard from someone with helpful advice but thanks for your comment anyway.


    Thanks, I do know why I want to swap, I wouldn't be making the transition if I didn't. But I've never met anyone who has done it before but what Ive heard is that it's quite difficult. That's why I was just wondering if there's anyone out there who has. To share advice or give me some hope that it's possible haha. Thanks though
    I'm a nurse , and am currently half way through GEM. Its quite difficult in the fact that GEM is competitive and nursing doesn't really give you any advantage (plus its not scientific enough for some universities). It is most definitely a change in pace and studying medicine is nothing like studying nursing.

    This may be a bit rich coming from me, but I would think seriously before making the switch. Although nurses and AHPs are probably next on the list, the working conditions of junior doctors have been heavily eroded in recent years, and set to get a lot worse. We think the hours are bad as nurses, but our hours are generally more controlled and limited than doctors. And because we get paid per hour, it can often work out that nurses end up being better paid, at least at first, for the work they actually do. Plus there isn't the added expense of exorbitant indemnity insurance and professional exams.

    Have you spoken to any junior doctors about this?
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I'm a nurse , and am currently half way through GEM. Its quite difficult in the fact that GEM is competitive and nursing doesn't really give you any advantage (plus its not scientific enough for some universities). It is most definitely a change in pace and studying medicine is nothing like studying nursing.

    This may be a bit rich coming from me, but I would think seriously before making the switch. Although nurses and AHPs are probably next on the list, the working conditions of junior doctors have been heavily eroded in recent years, and set to get a lot worse. We think the hours are bad as nurses, but our hours are generally more controlled and limited than doctors. And because we get paid per hour, it can often work out that nurses end up being better paid, at least at first, for the work they actually do. Plus there isn't the added expense of exorbitant indemnity insurance and professional exams.

    Have you spoken to any junior doctors about this?
    Sorry to bother you, but what were your GCSE's and a-level grades when applying for GEM?
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    During my medicine clinical years we had a girl on my firm who used to be a nurse - she's now a ST2, so well on the way as a Doctor. Her only advice was ever:

    Don't tell the other Nurses that's what you're going to do. And don't tell Nurses you used to be a Nurse.

    Read into that what you will.
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    (Original post by Mimir)
    During my medicine clinical years we had a girl on my firm who used to be a nurse - she's now a ST2, so well on the way as a Doctor. Her only advice was ever:

    Don't tell the other Nurses that's what you're going to do. And don't tell Nurses you used to be a Nurse.

    Read into that what you will.
    TBH that depends on the people you work with and whether you're using nursing as a stepping stone to medicine. All my nursing colleagues have given me amazing support and are very happy for me. Nurses I meet as a medical student, are always encouraging and say we make the best doctors (we do )

    What no body likes, is when someone does nursing simply because they think it will be a good degree to do to get them in to medicine. That won't go down well.

    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Sorry to bother you, but what were your GCSE's and a-level grades when applying for GEM?
    This is probably of little use to you really but
    GCSEs 2A*s, 3As, 4Bs
    A-levels ABBC
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    TBH that depends on the people you work with and whether you're using nursing as a stepping stone to medicine. All my nursing colleagues have given me amazing support and are very happy for me. Nurses I meet as a medical student, are always encouraging and say we make the best doctors (we do )

    What no body likes, is when someone does nursing simply because they think it will be a good degree to do to get them in to medicine. That won't go down well.



    This is probably of little use to you really but
    GCSEs 2A*s, 3As, 4Bs
    A-levels ABBC
    Thank you
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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I'm a nurse , and am currently half way through GEM. Its quite difficult in the fact that GEM is competitive and nursing doesn't really give you any advantage (plus its not scientific enough for some universities). It is most definitely a change in pace and studying medicine is nothing like studying nursing.

    This may be a bit rich coming from me, but I would think seriously before making the switch. Although nurses and AHPs are probably next on the list, the working conditions of junior doctors have been heavily eroded in recent years, and set to get a lot worse. We think the hours are bad as nurses, but our hours are generally more controlled and limited than doctors. And because we get paid per hour, it can often work out that nurses end up being better paid, at least at first, for the work they actually do. Plus there isn't the added expense of exorbitant indemnity insurance and professional exams.

    Have you spoken to any junior doctors about this?
    Yeah I can imagine it's not the same! How long were you a nurse for and where are you studying? I have talked to many junior doctors and I mean I've seen it myself, it's ridiculous!! It's why I never thought of medicine in the first place. And as you've said it's gotten worse/going to get worse. Plus studying medicine never ends. And that's why I want to work before I apply to make absolutely sure this is the right choice. And I keep trying to convince myself that I could do all these things like become a CNS or go into research but I know it's not what I want. Its not that nursing isn't enough, I love nursing so much but there's something missing.. I want to see and help patients in a different way that I just can't do as a nurse, if that makes sense? Even a sense of fulfilment in a different way. It's so hard to word it because I don't want to make nursing sound like it was a bad choice because it definitely wasn't. I just personally can't do it forever. But anyway.. Will have to just see.. Thank you for replying.
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    (Original post by SunRiseAtDawn)
    Yeah I can imagine it's not the same! How long were you a nurse for and where are you studying? I have talked to many junior doctors and I mean I've seen it myself, it's ridiculous!! It's why I never thought of medicine in the first place. And as you've said it's gotten worse/going to get worse. Plus studying medicine never ends. And that's why I want to work before I apply to make absolutely sure this is the right choice. And I keep trying to convince myself that I could do all these things like become a CNS or go into research but I know it's not what I want. Its not that nursing isn't enough, I love nursing so much but there's something missing.. I want to see and help patients in a different way that I just can't do as a nurse, if that makes sense? Even a sense of fulfilment in a different way. It's so hard to word it because I don't want to make nursing sound like it was a bad choice because it definitely wasn't. I just personally can't do it forever. But anyway.. Will have to just see.. Thank you for replying.
    I understand where you're coming from. I feel similarly. But as long as you know it's hard going and full of frustrations.

    I was qualified for three years before I made the switch.

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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I understand where you're coming from. I feel similarly. But as long as you know it's hard going and full of frustrations.

    I was qualified for three years before I made the switch.

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    Yeah thanks
 
 
 
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