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    Hi I just had my last exam today and it went horrific. I am pretty sure I got a D on this paper. I think for my overall results I'll get AAC or ABB. This is obviously my fault for not studying hard enough (I studied a week before for each exam). My university offer is AAB for English and I'll probably be rejected.

    I could go through clearing but the truth is I don't even want to do an English literature degree. I enjoy reading but I don't like the idea of investing £27,000 in a degree that people look down upon and view as worthless (I'm from an Asian family as well which makes thing worse) with little contact hours, it seems pointless to me.

    I think I'll take a gap year to resit that D and move it to an A and also take up AS Maths as a private student. My issue is, will companies look down on me for this when I apply for jobs? I already wasted a year because i did some useless diploma at a college and I'll be 20 now when I go to university. I don't know what to do, should I just go through clearing and study English?

    I've been thinking of doing Economics instead now at university.




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    (Original post by grassntai)
    Hi I just had my last exam today and it went horrific. I am pretty sure I got a D on this paper. I think for my overall results I'll get AAC or ABB. This is obviously my fault for not studying hard enough (I studied a week before for each exam). My university offer is AAB for English and I'll probably be rejected.

    I could go through clearing but the truth is I don't even want to do an English literature degree. I enjoy reading but I don't like the idea of investing £27,000 in a degree that people look down upon and view as worthless (I'm from an Asian family as well which makes thing worse) with little contact hours, it seems pointless to me.

    I think I'll take a gap year to resit that D and move it to an A and also take up AS Maths as a private student. My issue is, will companies look down on me for this when I apply for jobs? I already wasted a year because i did some useless diploma at a college and I'll be 20 now when I go to university. I don't know what to do, should I just go through clearing and study English?

    I've been thinking of doing Economics instead now at university.




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    If you really want to study Economics, you might do better to take a full A-level in Maths. It will give you more choice of unis as many make it a requirement.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    If you really want to study Economics, you might do better to take a full A-level in Maths. It will give you more choice of unis as many make it a requirement.
    Dude I would love to but I'm not going to able to do that in one year, I just don't have the ability and I'll be working part time as well. I'm going to be a resit student anyway so my options are already closed off from institutions like LSE. I looked at Birmingham's course and its AAA without maths being a requirement.


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    You can go through clearing for pretty much any course even if it's not the one you applied for (I know, it's pretty terrible because people can just change their minds last minute having expressed zero interest in the course but good if it's exactly what you want).

    I don't know what A levels you have but I know some places don't mind that you haven't done maths for econ. Take a look at some courses now and make a list maybe? If there is a university you set your mind to that wants maths then I'd say take the year off to do it.

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    (Original post by grassntai)
    Dude I would love to but I'm not going to able to do that in one year, I just don't have the ability and I'll be working part time as well. I'm going to be a resit student anyway so my options are already closed off from institutions like LSE. I looked at Birmingham's course and its AAA without maths being a requirement.


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    Did you notice that if you don't have an A-C in A-level Maths you have to do two modules in 'Introductory Quantitative Methods'? These cover topics such as differentiation and calculus, in order to bring you up to speed with the mathematical knowledge required to study Economics at degree level. If you 'don't have the ability' to take A-level Maths, this could be an issue.

    Don't make any impulsive decisions. If you are accepted for English and are still unsure, ask to defer for a year.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    Did you notice that if you don't have an A-C in A-level Maths you have to do two modules in 'Introductory Quantitative Methods'? These cover topics such as differentiation and calculus, in order to bring you up to speed with the mathematical knowledge required to study Economics at degree level. If you 'don't have the ability' to take A-level Maths, this could be an issue.

    Don't make any impulsive decisions. If you are accepted for English and are still unsure, ask to defer for a year.
    I got an A* at GCSE maths but I've not done it at A level. So I don't know, but I'm certainly not some genius who can do A level maths in one year ffs. Doing any A level in one year is tough. Surely if I've done at least AS maths the quantitative module will be easier?

    I'm going to most likely defer the year to do AS maths and work part time, but like I said I'm worried companies will look down on me for the fact that I'm spending an extra year resitting one exam




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    (Original post by grassntai)
    I got an A* at GCSE maths but I've not done it at A level. So I don't know, but I'm certainly not some genius who can do A level maths in one year ffs. Doing any A level in one year is tough. Surely if I've done at least AS maths the quantitative module will be easier?

    I'm going to most likely defer the year to do AS maths and work part time, but like I said I'm worried companies will look down on me for the fact that I'm spending an extra year resitting one exam




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    The quantitative modules will be about as hard as the second half of A level maths I would imagine. You'd simply not do the additional module (usually mechanics which is easy).

    Incidentally, many people at my 6th form managed to do A level maths in a year (then further maths second year), it's not uncommon or reserved for geniuses. If you achieved an A* at GCSE perhaps you'd do better than you think?

    I'd consider your options carefully.
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    (Original post by grassntai)
    I got an A* at GCSE maths but I've not done it at A level. So I don't know, but I'm certainly not some genius who can do A level maths in one year ffs. Doing any A level in one year is tough. Surely if I've done at least AS maths the quantitative module will be easier?

    I'm going to most likely defer the year to do AS maths and work part time, but like I said I'm worried companies will look down on me for the fact that I'm spending an extra year resitting one exam




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    Which companies are you speaking of here? Your future career or what? You haven't mentioned what you want to do but most universities won't mind that you've resat and if you do well in your degree - it doesn't matter.

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    (Original post by Elivercury)
    The quantitative modules will be about as hard as the second half of A level maths I would imagine. You'd simply not do the additional module (usually mechanics which is easy).

    Incidentally, many people at my 6th form managed to do A level maths in a year (then further maths second year), it's not uncommon or reserved for geniuses. If you achieved an A* at GCSE perhaps you'd do better than you think?

    I'd consider your options carefully.
    Surely they wouldn't make those options available then if they thought students without A level maths couldn't cope?

    And Isn't AS supposed to provide a foundation for A2 though? How am I supposed to do A2 maths when I'm doing AS maths at the same time? I'll have to work part time to pay for the tuitions as well so it's not like I'll be free all day.


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    (Original post by Captivated)
    Which companies are you speaking of here? Your future career or what? You haven't mentioned what you want to do but most universities won't mind that you've resat and if you do well in your degree - it doesn't matter.

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    Like the civil service fast stream or the accountancy big 4


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    (Original post by grassntai)
    Surely they wouldn't make those options available then if they thought students without A level maths couldn't cope?

    And Isn't AS supposed to provide a foundation for A2 though? How am I supposed to do A2 maths when I'm doing AS maths at the same time? I'll have to work part time to pay for the tuitions as well so it's not like I'll be free all day.


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    The module is clearly designed to teach you what you are missing but will require from A2 maths. Those with A2 maths don't have to do it as they already know it. If you're unable to cope, you're going to be unable to do with whole degree I would imagine.

    You do AS maths in 6 months, sitting the exams in Jan/Feb, then do A2 in 6 months sitting the exam in May/June, so it follows the chronological order. People do this alongside 2-4 other A levels, so it's definitely doable if you are decent at maths. If you're not decent at maths you may want to rethink your choices.

    Why do you need to work to pay for tuition? That is what loans are for and assuming everything had panned out you would be going to university in a couple of months? I mean, some part time work and money for university will by no means hurt, but I'm unsure why it's suddenly become a requirement.
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    (Original post by Elivercury)
    The module is clearly designed to teach you what you are missing but will require from A2 maths. Those with A2 maths don't have to do it as they already know it. If you're unable to cope, you're going to be unable to do with whole degree I would imagine.

    You do AS maths in 6 months, sitting the exams in Jan/Feb, then do A2 in 6 months sitting the exam in May/June, so it follows the chronological order. People do this alongside 2-4 other A levels, so it's definitely doable if you are decent at maths. If you're not decent at maths you may want to rethink your choices.

    Why do you need to work to pay for tuition? That is what loans are for and assuming everything had panned out you would be going to university in a couple of months? I mean, some part time work and money for university will by no means hurt, but I'm unsure why it's suddenly become a requirement.
    What? I thought all exams were taken during May/June, how can you take an exam in Jan/Feb?


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    (Original post by grassntai)
    What? I thought all exams were taken during May/June, how can you take an exam in Jan/Feb?


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    I did Jan/Feb exams for several of my A levels, it was at my 6th form's discretion when they wanted us to do them. But I did the older style, so perhaps things have changed. Exam board may also affect things.

    At any rate, you could still learn it all in a year and sit all the exams in one go. I suggest you enquire about crashing A level maths if you're serious.
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    (Original post by grassntai)
    I got an A* at GCSE maths but I've not done it at A level. So I don't know, but I'm certainly not some genius who can do A level maths in one year ffs. Doing any A level in one year is tough.
    As pointed out by others, you don't have to be a genius to do a whole A-level in one year.

    (Original post by grassntai)
    I'll have to work part time to pay for the tuitions as well so it's not like I'll be free all day.
    At the moment, you do three A2 subjects. If you do a single AS and A2 combined, that is not a full-time commitment.

    (Original post by grassntai)
    Like the civil service fast stream or the accountancy big 4
    I think you're getting a bit ahead of yourself here.
 
 
 
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