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Do you think its wrong to dissect on cats and rats at A level and GCSE standard? Watch

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    I mean I understand why for veterinary medicine and medicine in general;however for A level standard I find it to be totally unethical. Life is so precious and we only have one life and to devalue a creature's life to just organs and disregard its sentience is absolutely disgraceful. I'm okay with using specific organs such as the heart as the creature may have died from natural courses.But I am totally against rats being killed for dissections at A level standard as it is completely unnecessary and can easily learn how the digestive and circulatory system works via interactive diagrams which work just as well. I'm also not against eating meat as I understand that is for survival and their are food systems and that's just a part of life. I'm just totally against the act of the disrespect of life itself.
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    I hope you never get ill to the point you require hospital treatment. If you do, make sure you ask the doctors not to administer any medicine to you, or use any form of medical procedure on you... for ethical reasons of course.
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    Uhm... There are no rat or cat dissections at GCSE or A level...

    The worse I had to do is dissecting a pig's eye...
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    I hope you never get ill to the point you require hospital treatment. If you do, make sure you ask the doctors not to administer any medicine to you, or use any form of medical procedure on you... for ethical reasons of course.
    Such a fool. Leaving a human to die is so much worse than saying that getting young students to slice up animals which maybe remind them of their beloved pets may not be a good idea.
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    (Original post by Gora The Xplorer)
    Such a fool. Leaving a human to die is so much worse than saying that getting young students to slice up animals which maybe remind them of their beloved pets may not be a good idea.
    But knowledge in this field is obtained by doing, not looking. However, you seem to have changed tack. You now seem to be more concerned about the fact that students will be psychologically damaged by dissecting a cat or rat. Which is it?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    But knowledge in this field is obtained by doing, not looking. However, you seem to have changed tack. You now seem to be more concerned about the fact that students will be psychologically damaged by dissecting a cat or rat. Which is it?
    I presume you can read in which case you will see that I am not OP. Letting humans die to prove some non-existent point you may think you have about worshiping science like a religion is callous and anti-humanitarian.
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    (Original post by Gora The Xplorer)
    I presume you can read in which case you will see that I am not OP. Letting humans die to prove some non-existent point you may think you have about worshiping science like a religion is callous and anti-humanitarian.
    In your opinion yes. And in my opinion, no. The acquisition of knowledge is fundamental to who we are both as humans and as a society. I do not go all sentimental over cute puppies and kittens. I therefore don't find it particularly abhorrent to see them dissected in the pursuit of teaching or learning. I believe I am in a majority on that one too.

    My point to you, is that you are drawing a rather arbitrary line as to what is acceptable and what is not. The killing of animals for teaching in schools is clearly not acceptable to you, but killing them for medical research or food is. What is the difference? You can theoretically perform research without animals and similarly you don't need to eat animals. So what are you? Pro-use-of-animals or not?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    In your opinion yes. And in my opinion, no. The acquisition of knowledge is fundamental to who we are both as humans and as a society. I do not go all sentimental over cute puppies and kittens. I therefore don't find it particularly abhorrent to see them dissected in the pursuit of teaching or learning. I believe I am in a majority on that one too.

    My point to you, is that you are drawing a rather arbitrary line as to what is acceptable and what is not. The killing of animals for teaching in schools is clearly not acceptable to you, but killing them for medical research or food is. What is the difference? You can theoretically perform research without animals and similarly you don't need to eat animals. So what are you? Pro-use-of-animals or not?
    There is no reason for it to be necessary in the A level syllabus, if it can annoy students, upset them or put them off science it should be left out.

    I am in favour of animal experimentation since I recognise the scientific value herein. I am however aware that comparing a scientist who is consenting to use of animals in scientific experiments as part of her/his job is unlikely to be as controversial as forcing students to slice up animals I am also mature enough to realise how cruel, callous and frankly evil those people who are of the view that others who do not agree with animal testing should be afforded the same medical care as anyone else rather than allowing them to die to prove some twisted point.
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    (Original post by Gora The Xplorer)
    There is no reason for it to be necessary in the A level syllabus, if it can annoy students, upset them or put them off science it should be left out.
    Well let's call it a lesson in life. There are lots of things in life that are not pleasant. But I would have thought disection was on the cards for any wanna-be biologist. The delicate of mind need not apply. #1stworldproblems
 
 
 
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