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    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JUN15.PDF

    explain to me question 2e i don't understand why the answer isn't fragmentation
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JUN15.PDF

    explain to me question 2e i don't understand why the answer isn't fragmentation
    I might be wrong but Tellurium is an element not a compound. I don't think you can make it undergo fragmentation because you're not splitting it into ions, it's just a single element. In this case, you might be making it into an ion
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    (Original post by Firenze26)
    I might be wrong but Tellurium is an element not a compound. I don't think you can make it undergo fragmentation because you're not splitting it into ions, it's just a single element. In this case, you might be making it into an ion
    Oh ok so it's not fragmentation so what's the right answer and why?
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    Oh ok so it's not fragmentation so what's the right answer and why?
    I really don't have an idea on what the answer is actually since I haven't learned this particular topic so I'm just using theories and stuff.

    I'm assuming that it has a state or something where it acts sorta as a diatomic molecule in which it can create a charge based on the fact that there's a significant peak at 128 which is 64+64 but that's just an idea.

    Sorry.
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    (Original post by Firenze26)
    I might be wrong but Tellurium is an element not a compound. I don't think you can make it undergo fragmentation because you're not splitting it into ions, it's just a single element. In this case, you might be making it into an ion
    the m/z at 64 is due to the 128Te2+ ion
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    (Original post by GDN)
    the m/z at 64 is due to the 128Te2+ ion
    How did that happen? Did it disassociate or something?
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    (Original post by Firenze26)
    How did that happen? Did it disassociate or something?
    an atom lost two electrons during the electron bombardment (it happens sometimes)
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    (Original post by GDN)
    the m/z at 64 is due to the 128Te2+ ion
    i don't understand where this comes from
    (Original post by charco)
    an atom lost two electrons during the electron bombardment (it happens sometimes)
    I don't understand ? what's happening, it seems to me there's just random links everywhere ^-^

    i can see halving 128 gives 64
    i don't even know if Te is a diatomic molecule or not
    i have no idea where 2 electrons lost comes from
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    i don't understand where this comes from


    I don't understand ? what's happening, it seems to me there's just random links everywhere ^-^

    i can see halving 128 gives 64
    i don't even know if Te is a diatomic molecule or not
    i have no idea where 2 electrons lost comes from
    Metals don't normally form diatomics (they can, it's just usually in specific circumstances). In this kind of question just consider individual atoms being bombarded with electrons.

    So mass spec measures the mass/charge ratio, what happens if two electrons are removed, not one?
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    (Original post by alow)
    Metals don't normally form diatomics (they can, it's just usually in specific circumstances). In this kind of question just consider individual atoms being bombarded with electrons.

    So mass spec measures the mass/charge ratio, what happens if two electrons are removed, not one?
    So how can you have 64 as an m/z then???
    Where do electrons come into this?

    wait so mass/charge ratio

    so if you got a mass of 128 and you lose 2 electrons then huh??? i don't understand
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    So how can you have 64 as an m/z then???
    Where do electrons come into this?

    wait so mass/charge ratio

    so if you got a mass of 128 and you lose 2 electrons then huh??? i don't understand
    This type of mass spec works by ionising the species (in this case atoms of Te) you want to find the mass for, then accelerating them. This gives you the amount of mass per unit charge of the ionised species.

    One of the most common isotopes of Te is Te-128. So when you ionise the Te to Te+, you get a reading at 128 (as the mass-to-charge ratio is 128/1). However if you ionise the Te to Te2+, you get a reading at 64 (as the mass-to-charge ratio is 128/2=64).
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    So how can you have 64 as an m/z then???
    Where do electrons come into this?

    wait so mass/charge ratio

    so if you got a mass of 128 and you lose 2 electrons then huh??? i don't understand
    The x-axis scale is mass/charge (m/z)

    m/z means mass to charge RATIO

    If the mass is 128 and the charge is 2+ then the ratio = 128/2 = 64

    During the electron bombardment process occasionally an atom loses two electrons and develops a double positive charge = 2+

    So its mass to charge ratio = 128/2 = 64

    I can't say it in simpler terms!
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    (Original post by alow)
    This type of mass spec works by ionising the species (in this case atoms of Te) you want to find the mass for, then accelerating them. This gives you the amount of mass per unit charge of the ionised species.

    One of the most common isotopes of Te is Te-128. So when you ionise the Te to Te+, you get a reading at 128 (as the mass-to-charge ratio is 128/1). However if you ionise the Te to Te2+, you get a reading at 64 (as the mass-to-charge ratio is 128/2=64).
    (Original post by charco)
    The x-axis scale is mass/charge (m/z)

    m/z means mass to charge RATIO

    If the mass is 128 and the charge is 2+ then the ratio = 128/2 = 64

    During the electron bombardment process occasionally an atom loses two electrons and develops a double positive charge = 2+

    So its mass to charge ratio = 128/2 = 64

    I can't say it in simpler terms!
    oh i see right i understand now

    so what if the ion is Te1+?? 128/1 is still 1 so how would i know any differe....

    good point that's me being silly

    That's TOF mass spec right? not electron impact
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    (Original post by dskinner)
    oh i see right i understand now

    so what if the ion is Te1+?? 128/1 is still 1 so how would i know any differe....

    good point that's me being silly

    That's TOF mass spec right? not electron impact
    In ALL forms of mess spectrometry the species must be ionised first. Otherwise you could not accelerate them ...
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    (Original post by charco)
    In ALL forms of mess spectrometry the species must be ionised first. Otherwise you could not accelerate them ...
    ah yes good point, electron whacked off with the electron gun and for TOF mass spec, a proton is added?
 
 
 
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