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    What do you think Ukip's current and future position is now after getting the result they wanted?

    Will this strengthen their vote in 2020 or will the momentum only be short term?

    Do you think labour voters and some tory's will get eaten by ukip?

    Do you think Nigel Farage will resign too? If so who do you think should lead ukip?

    Do you think ukip will help with the talks that the next PM does with the EU (considering ukip are Eu reps)

    What happens to ukip MP's (correct?) in Europe after we leave? Will they stay or leave?

    Just some food for thought since alot are talking about the Tory's and Labour atm :P

    P.S: I created the same threat in the News and Current Affairs Section but the remains have flooded it that much that my thread does not get seen...So I posted it here instead. Feel free to delete my other thread.
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    This could potentially be an interesting debate, I look forward to seeing what people have to say about this. :yep:
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    I'm not sure about the future of UKIP but the referendum will do the profile of Nigel Farage no harm whatsoever.

    No matter what never write that man off.
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    My opinion on the matter is that UKIP is going to surge in areas that were thought of as mostly labour heartlands. Currently they are polling around 18% nationally and I wouldn't be surprised if that goes up to 23% + in the coming days with labour being the key losers.

    My reasoning for this is that if anything it was the working class vote in labour heartlands that took us out the eu. Hartlepool, Bleaneu Gwent, and Bolsover all voted solidly for leave. Newcastle nearly voted leave. Birmingham voted leave despite Labour holding most of the MPs there. The only place that voted remain which labour 'represent' is London - which really establishes the fact that the Labour leadership appeals mostly to urban liberal voters from inner London. These voters I feel are now beginning to question whether labours dominance in these areas is worthwhile for their own interests.

    They were also consistently vastly out of touch on the public with this issue. Blair didn't think the EU would be an issue, Brown called a women a bigot in 2010 for questioning it, Miliband was weak over Europe refusing a referendum and Corbyn... Where was Corbyn for the whole of the referendum? The only time I saw him was him saying Europe was a 7/10 on a Channel 4 chat show.

    This contrasts with the Tories who I feel did better at persuading people to remain. Most of the districts that voted remain in England were in the south east and south west of England, where the Tories dominate. The Tories addressed that there were valid concerns (and attempted reform) and I believe moved over traditional Tory voters to remain. I think they will remain mostly unscathed with a ukip surge.

    This to me raises another question : what will happen if BoJo is installed as Tory leader? I think there could be a realignment of the right in this country with the possibility of electoral pacts with the parties, as suggested in the previous election by Nadine Dorries. I think there will also be an election sometime in the next year which ukip could gain more seats in.

    That's just my 20 pence in it though...


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    No doubt about it. That was the risk Boris had to take to win. The UKIP supporter that voted for others secretly will speak louder.
    Also worth noting that Farage now had a highly notable victory to his name which he (sort of) figure-headed.

    In term if their chance of getting one of them to be PM, no chance.
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    This could potentially be an interesting debate, I look forward to seeing what people have to say about this. :yep:
    Thats why I made this thread

    (Original post by Hardigan)
    I'm not sure about the future of UKIP but the referendum will do the profile of Nigel Farage no harm whatsoever.

    No matter what never write that man off.
    I agree love or hate farage, he helped (you could argue made) this referendum happen and should be respected for that.

    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    My opinion on the matter is that UKIP is going to surge in areas that were thought of as mostly labour heartlands. Currently they are polling around 18% nationally and I wouldn't be surprised if that goes up to 23% + in the coming days with labour being the key losers.

    My reasoning for this is that if anything it was the working class vote in labour heartlands that took us out the eu. Hartlepool, Bleaneu Gwent, and Bolsover all voted solidly for leave. Newcastle nearly voted leave. Birmingham voted leave despite Labour holding most of the MPs there. The only place that voted remain which labour 'represent' is London - which really establishes the fact that the Labour leadership appeals mostly to urban liberal voters from inner London. These voters I feel are now beginning to question whether labours dominance in these areas is worthwhile for their own interests.

    They were also consistently vastly out of touch on the public with this issue. Blair didn't think the EU would be an issue, Brown called a women a bigot in 2010 for questioning it, Miliband was weak over Europe refusing a referendum and Corbyn... Where was Corbyn for the whole of the referendum? The only time I saw him was him saying Europe was a 7/10 on a Channel 4 chat show.

    This contrasts with the Tories who I feel did better at persuading people to remain. Most of the districts that voted remain in England were in the south east and south west of England, where the Tories dominate. The Tories addressed that there were valid concerns (and attempted reform) and I believe moved over traditional Tory voters to remain. I think they will remain mostly unscathed with a ukip surge.

    This to me raises another question : what will happen if BoJo is installed as Tory leader? I think there could be a realignment of the right in this country with the possibility of electoral pacts with the parties, as suggested in the previous election by Nadine Dorries. I think there will also be an election sometime in the next year which ukip could gain more seats in.

    That's just my 20 pence in it though...


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Some very interesting points you have there. Do you think labour will go back to its traditional routes though which may cause ukip's momentum to stall?

    Also, do you believe their will be some tory defectors to ukip if say boris gets in or someone else who is quite unpopular?

    Are you on about a General Election when you say that?

    (Original post by DJBay123)
    No doubt about it. That was the risk Boris had to take to win. The UKIP supporter that voted for others secretly will speak louder.
    Also worth noting that Farage now had a highly notable victory to his name which he (sort of) figure-headed.

    In term if their chance of getting one of them to be PM, no chance.
    What risk are you on about? and ye the secret ukip votes did play a huge part. Do you think Boris will claim the credit though?
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    The risk that he would pull up another party (UKIP) along with him if we left, since I can't see May beating Boris to provisional PM.

    Noone will need to claim anything. People will soon forgot the detail of this, only the winners and losers.

    Maybe our children will sit down in S-Level History:
    Explain how the 'Brexit' vote triggered the collapse of the EU and the short and long term effects on England.
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    They'll certainly overtake lefty Labour and possibly be on par with the Conservatives at the next general election. I can see the voting percentages for England going something like this:

    Conservatives - 35%
    UKIP - 35%
    Labour - 10%
    Britain First - 10%
    Lib Dems - 5%
    Other (including the hippies and independents) - 5%

    Of course they'll be unfairly robbed in terms of parliamentary seats, but should still take a decent amount.
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    (Original post by mrITguy)
    What do you think Ukip's current and future position is now after getting the result they wanted?

    Will this strengthen their vote in 2020 or will the momentum only be short term?

    Do you think labour voters and some tory's will get eaten by ukip?

    Do you think Nigel Farage will resign too? If so who do you think should lead ukip?

    Do you think ukip will help with the talks that the next PM does with the EU (considering ukip are Eu reps)

    What happens to ukip MP's (correct?) in Europe after we leave? Will they stay or leave?

    Just some food for thought since alot are talking about the Tory's and Labour atm :P

    P.S: I created the same threat in the News and Current Affairs Section but the remains have flooded it that much that my thread does not get seen...So I posted it here instead. Feel free to delete my other thread.
    If Labour was not in disarray i would say UKIP are completely done. However.. Labour are well out of touch with the electorate, with their leader...

    I personally see no use for UKIP now.. they have served their purpose

    If labour continue to be the basket case they are and the economy and the UK handles the uncertainty well over the coming 3 years.. I can see UKIP massively increasing their 4 million voters
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    Depends on Labour. If Blairites get in then UKIP will grow. If Old Labour return with a new leader who has charisma then UKIP will struggle to swallow up those voters.
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    (Original post by DJBay123)
    The risk that he would pull up another party (UKIP) along with him if we left, since I can't see May beating Boris to provisional PM.

    Noone will need to claim anything. People will soon forgot the detail of this, only the winners and losers.

    Maybe our children will sit down in S-Level History:
    Explain how the 'Brexit' vote triggered the collapse of the EU and the short and long term effects on England.
    Lol maybe.

    (Original post by stevey396)
    They'll certainly overtake lefty Labour and possibly be on par with the Conservatives at the next general election. I can see the voting percentages for England going something like this:

    Conservatives - 35%
    UKIP - 35%
    Labour - 10%
    Britain First - 10%
    Lib Dems - 5%
    Other (including the hippies and independents) - 5%

    Of course they'll be unfairly robbed in terms of parliamentary seats, but should still take a decent amount.
    This is the issue I was worried about.....there still hasn't been a push for electorate reform despite the last election. If they did get this vote percentage, how many seats would the get?

    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    If Labour was not in disarray i would say UKIP are completely done. However.. Labour are well out of touch with the electorate, with their leader...

    I personally see no use for UKIP now.. they have served their purpose

    If labour continue to be the basket case they are and the economy and the UK handles the uncertainty well over the coming 3 years.. I can see UKIP massively increasing their 4 million voters
    Ye, I think re-branding the party is inevitable. I do think they have a purpose though, since they are now what old labour used to be in representing the working class. Who do you think will be labours new leader? and how will they fair against ukip.
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    The whole far right movement will die down in a year or 2 when we've seen the consequences of this referendum.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    The whole far right movement will die down in a year or 2 when we've seen the consequences of this referendum.
    Haha, what "consequences"? Brexit will make the UK more prosperous than ever before, and the inevitability of Scotland leaving will make us a very solid right-wing country, with you lefty liberals having no chance of power. The far-right movement is here to stay.
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    It really depends on what happens. If the Brexit turns out to be a huge disaster in the years to come, and people regret leaving. UKIP support will vanish, but if it's a success, it could grow. (There is no certainty which way this will go, I feel leaving was the wrong decision)

    It also depends if Labour can get in a charismatic and universally liked leader, capable of taking back the working class vote.

    Just my opinion.
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    (Original post by stevey396)
    Haha, what "consequences"? Brexit will make the UK more prosperous than ever before, and the inevitability of Scotland leaving will make us a very solid right-wing country, with you lefty liberals having no chance of power. The far-right movement is here to stay.
    Being too far-right or far-left is never good. As much as you dislike the "lefty liberals" or I dislike the right wing.
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    One thing I was thinking before the results was that leave could do really well because the general election saw ukip quite strong and that the result would reflect that, people like their dislike for the EU, most just don't want them in gvt and EU issue is the main reason ppl supported them

    They could end up worse off now that this issue is dealt with and they don't really offer much more
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    A lot will depend on how Europe develops. If it goes to the dogs, people will think we dodged a bullet, if it goes well, people will regret it. Either way, it will take a few years to find out.

    The UK's current problem is trying to stay in one piece. Its pretty obvious Scotland is looking at the £65 billion tax the financial services in London pays and wants all of it. Thats why they are so keen to get independence before the UK leaves the EU so businesses can transfer to Edinburgh without being tempted by Frankfurt or Paris first.

    Scotland is also looking at all the international companies like Airbus and Toyota that might move to the EU and tempt them to go to Scotland instead if it is in the EU. Basically , Scotland is looking to cherry pick all the companies that might move to the EU and go to Scotland if it stays in the EU.
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    (Original post by mrITguy)

    Some very interesting points you have there. Do you think labour will go back to its traditional routes though which may cause ukip's momentum to stall?

    Also, do you believe their will be some tory defectors to ukip if say boris gets in or someone else who is quite unpopular?

    Are you on about a General Election when you say that?
    1) Labour are at their traditional routes now. Corbyn is an old style trade union socialist who is similar to Labour in the 1960s/1970s. The issue in the Labour Party is that there is a major split in the party as to whether high immigration is a good thing or not - and this is very visible to voters and so turns off Labkippers from voting for them

    2) Tories won't defect to ukip. The Eurosceptics are now the dominant force in the party and if Boris wins there is further no reason for them to move (my hunch is on Theresa May though). What I could see though is Boris's Tories and UKIP making much in common + so it's possible there could be electoral pacts, in say, places where the Tories have no chance in (mostly in northern seats). This would be catastrophic in my view. To be fair UKIP might not exist after the election as they have achieved their primary purpose but I think they will exist after the referendum to push for electoral reform, grammar schools, cuts in aid, other manifesto promises etc etc.

    3) I think there will be a general election within the year. My reasoning for that is that the new prime minister will want a mandate to perform any EU negotiations for Britain, and to prevent any opposing side (whether they be Europhiles/Eurosceptics) from limiting the negotiations. We should all remember that the PMs position is weak as he only has a majority of around 6 in Commons.



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    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    Being too far-right or far-left is never good. As much as you dislike the "lefty liberals" or I dislike the right wing.
    The far left is much more likely to happen and is far more scary than far right could ever potentially be. The left is destroying western civilisation with it's political correct ******** and is the reason why people are turning away from the far left and why Trump doing so well in America.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    The whole far right movement will die down in a year or 2 when we've seen the consequences of this referendum.
    I very much doubt that and I wouldn't say ukip is far right either.

    (Original post by stevey396)
    Haha, what "consequences"? Brexit will make the UK more prosperous than ever before, and the inevitability of Scotland leaving will make us a very solid right-wing country, with you lefty liberals having no chance of power. The far-right movement is here to stay.
    Do you think northen ireland will leave?

    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    It really depends on what happens. If the Brexit turns out to be a huge disaster in the years to come, and people regret leaving. UKIP support will vanish, but if it's a success, it could grow. (There is no certainty which way this will go, I feel leaving was the wrong decision)

    It also depends if Labour can get in a charismatic and universally liked leader, capable of taking back the working class vote.

    Just my opinion.
    I do feel if it is a huge disaster though, someone will get the blame. Probably Farage but maybe Johnson too
    and we will re-join the EU. However, I very much doubt it will and I believe we will grow like you say.

    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    Being too far-right or far-left is never good. As much as you dislike the "lefty liberals" or I dislike the right wing.
    I wouldn't class ukip as far right though...and I think it depends of the situation really as to wheather its good to have one over the other.

    (Original post by ImNotReallyMe)
    One thing I was thinking before the results was that leave could do really well because the general election saw ukip quite strong and that the result would reflect that, people like their dislike for the EU, most just don't want them in gvt and EU issue is the main reason ppl supported them

    They could end up worse off now that this issue is dealt with and they don't really offer much more
    I was thinking the same thing lol. Nigel has already said that ukip will be re-branded and it will be very interesting as to what form that will take.

    (Original post by Maker)
    A lot will depend on how Europe develops. If it goes to the dogs, people will think we dodged a bullet, if it goes well, people will regret it. Either way, it will take a few years to find out.

    The UK's current problem is trying to stay in one piece. Its pretty obvious Scotland is looking at the £65 billion tax the financial services in London pays and wants all of it. Thats why they are so keen to get independence before the UK leaves the EU so businesses can transfer to Edinburgh without being tempted by Frankfurt or Paris first.

    Scotland is also looking at all the international companies like Airbus and Toyota that might move to the EU and tempt them to go to Scotland instead if it is in the EU. Basically , Scotland is looking to cherry pick all the companies that might move to the EU and go to Scotland if it stays in the EU.
    Interesting, thanks for explaining that. I do think though that the scots will not become independent as if they join the euro they will have to accept the Schengen Agreement along with the euro (since our currency is part of the union and bank of England). Unless of course the EU offers them great terms just to screw us over lol.

    Also who will fill the black hole that we have left in regards to funding?? Germany I expect and I bet the german people will not be happy about that :P

    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    1) Labour are at their traditional routes now. Corbyn is an old style trade union socialist who is similar to Labour in the 1960s/1970s. The issue in the Labour Party is that there is a major split in the party as to whether high immigration is a good thing or not - and this is very visible to voters and so turns off Labkippers from voting for them

    2) Tories won't defect to ukip. The Eurosceptics are now the dominant force in the party and if Boris wins there is further no reason for them to move (my hunch is on Theresa May though). What I could see though is Boris's Tories and UKIP making much in common + so it's possible there could be electoral pacts, in say, places where the Tories have no chance in (mostly in northern seats). This would be catastrophic in my view. To be fair UKIP might not exist after the election as they have achieved their primary purpose but I think they will exist after the referendum to push for electoral reform, grammar schools, cuts in aid, other manifesto promises etc etc.

    3) I think there will be a general election within the year. My reasoning for that is that the new prime minister will want a mandate to perform any EU negotiations for Britain, and to prevent any opposing side (whether they be Europhiles/Eurosceptics) from limiting the negotiations. We should all remember that the PMs position is weak as he only has a majority of around 6 in Commons.
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks for explaining labours old style to me. On point 2, didn't Theresa May favour remain though? So if she does become leader I expect some Tory's won't be happy and might defect to Ukip.

    Re-branding of Ukip is of course going to happen and like you said I think they will push for the issues you stated (but I wonder what other issues they will focus on that we haven't heard of). Do you think Nigel will resign or is he in a strong position as leader?

    (Original post by Dieselblue)
    The far left is much more likely to happen and is far more scary than far right could ever potentially be. The left is destroying western civilisation with it's political correct ******** and is the reason why people are turning away from the far left and why Trump doing so well in America.
    Agreed
 
 
 
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