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    So I'm going to be an NQT from September, and have been given a classroom that hasn't been used as a classroom before. It's smaller than a normal classroom, but then it is a smaller than normal class.

    Even so, I have decided that I do not want a desk for myself, and have said as much to the headteacher. However, I will need something to put my computer on, so that it stands next to the IWB and can be used whilst I am standing.

    Any suggestions as to what I should use? Filing cabinet? Chest of drawers? Something that locks? Considering that there is going to be plenty of storage available in my new classroom, it isn't as if I need something that stores the scissors, glue etc...
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    This looks pretty good also:
    http://www.wayfair.co.uk/House-Addit...-j8aAji18P8HAQ
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    So I'm going to be an NQT from September, and have been given a classroom that hasn't been used as a classroom before. It's smaller than a normal classroom, but then it is a smaller than normal class.

    Even so, I have decided that I do not want a desk for myself, and have said as much to the headteacher. However, I will need something to put my computer on, so that it stands next to the IWB and can be used whilst I am standing.

    Any suggestions as to what I should use? Filing cabinet? Chest of drawers? Something that locks? Considering that there is going to be plenty of storage available in my new classroom, it isn't as if I need something that stores the scissors, glue etc...
    I am very interested in why you don't want a desk. They serve some very useful purposes.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    I am very interested in why you don't want a desk. They serve some very useful purposes.
    There are a couple of reasons, really.

    Firstly, it's not a very large classroom, unlike others in the school, and I think the space saved by not having the large piece of furniture I was offered could be better used in some other way.

    Secondly, I don't ever want to be tempted into having a desk covered in clutter, or to be sat at it doing something instead of being with my class. Although I haven't felt like that so far, I've only been doing this since September, and it's never been a temptation, I don't want it ever to become one. I've seen it happen in some classrooms, and to my mind, the lack of desk will at the very least help, if not prevent, me from becoming a teacher that sits and works whilst ignoring my class.

    Whilst obviously not all teachers with desks are like this, it has struck a strong chord with me in the past year. Combined with the space issue, I think I would prefer my classroom without having a desk of my own.
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    There are a couple of reasons, really.

    Firstly, it's not a very large classroom, unlike others in the school, and I think the space saved by not having the large piece of furniture I was offered could be better used in some other way.

    Secondly, I don't ever want to be tempted into having a desk covered in clutter, or to be sat at it doing something instead of being with my class. Although I haven't felt like that so far, I've only been doing this since September, and it's never been a temptation, I don't want it ever to become one. I've seen it happen in some classrooms, and to my mind, the lack of desk will at the very least help, if not prevent, me from becoming a teacher that sits and works whilst ignoring my class.

    Whilst obviously not all teachers with desks are like this, it has struck a strong chord with me in the past year. Combined with the space issue, I think I would prefer my classroom without having a desk of my own.
    All very laudable. I can't agree that this is a practical option, I'm afraid, and there will be times when you will have to sit back and let the kids get on with practising the skill you have taught them. You will burn yourself out if you are full on all the time, and more to the point, the kids will burn out as well. You have to give them time out to do things by themselves, or they will never learn. There will also be times when you will need somewhere to sit with a child who needs to be talked to in some place away from the rest of the class, and in fact kids often like the privilege of being at the teacher's desk. However, it's your classroom, and it's up to you to arrange it how you like.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    All very laudable. I can't agree that this is a practical option, I'm afraid, and there will be times when you will have to sit back and let the kids get on with practising the skill you have taught them. You will burn yourself out if you are full on all the time, and more to the point, the kids will burn out as well. You have to give them time out to do things by themselves, or they will never learn. There will also be times when you will need somewhere to sit with a child who needs to be talked to in some place away from the rest of the class, and in fact kids often like the privilege of being at the teacher's desk. However, it's your classroom, and it's up to you to arrange it how you like.
    Completely agree with this. As an NQT I believed that I had to constantly walk around and chat and work with the students I taught. But that can in some ways distract them from longer, more challenging tasks. Now, 3 years on, I use my desk a lot while my students do more complex tasks. Whether that means I mark while they work (sometimes inevitable during heavy exam periods) or I have individuals come to the desk to work on something or have personal feedback. It is indispensable for me these days and the students appreciate my lessons more so now than they did when I first started. Be careful of shooting yourself in the foot and burning out too early plus, an organised desk sends out a clear message to students so they can follow your example with their work space!


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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    All very laudable. I can't agree that this is a practical option, I'm afraid, and there will be times when you will have to sit back and let the kids get on with practising the skill you have taught them. You will burn yourself out if you are full on all the time, and more to the point, the kids will burn out as well. You have to give them time out to do things by themselves, or they will never learn. There will also be times when you will need somewhere to sit with a child who needs to be talked to in some place away from the rest of the class, and in fact kids often like the privilege of being at the teacher's desk. However, it's your classroom, and it's up to you to arrange it how you like.
    (Original post by JustJen)
    Completely agree with this. As an NQT I believed that I had to constantly walk around and chat and work with the students I taught. But that can in some ways distract them from longer, more challenging tasks. Now, 3 years on, I use my desk a lot while my students do more complex tasks. Whether that means I mark while they work (sometimes inevitable during heavy exam periods) or I have individuals come to the desk to work on something or have personal feedback. It is indispensable for me these days and the students appreciate my lessons more so now than they did when I first started. Be careful of shooting yourself in the foot and burning out too early plus, an organised desk sends out a clear message to students so they can follow your example with their work space!


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    I can very much appreciate what you are both saying. And it is not as if I will not have the ability to sit down while the children work independently, or believe that I must be constantly working with the children 100% of the time. I don't. I'm more than happy to let them crack on with tasks, and I am aware that I can already do that. But the class I am about to get are one of those classes that need an eye keeping on them, and I am certain that, given the opportunity, I will happily sit down and start doing something and take my eye off the ball behaviour-wise - not a good idea with some of those that I am about to inherit! WIth a sort of desk area that allows me to stand to use it, I will have the organised work space, and hopefully something useful in terms of storage or functionality. But I will also have the ability to remain alert and aware at all times, if something needs to happen.

    And more importantly (although I think this point got a bit lost in amongst the other) I will not take up 2 square metres of valuable space in my small classroom.
 
 
 
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