Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone!

    I've just finished my Law degree (LLB) at the University of Sheffield to a good 2:1 standard which I am quite pleased about. I now feel like I would like to further my studies but I would not like to pursue anything more in Law as I don't think I could do it in my future.

    As I have always been interested in business and can see myself working in a business environment e.g sales or consultancy, I was hoping to apply for an MBA.

    Due to the lateness of my decision, I can't apply for 2016/2017 entry and will have to wait a few months to apply for the 2017 entry.

    The university I want to apply for is Oxford University.

    I'm wondering, if anyone has applied before or if anyone studies an MBA there currently, whether it is worth me applying with my current credentials?

    I have a solid 2:1 in Law at Uni of Sheff, I have good A-Levels (not that it counts probably lol), I am looking to take the GMAT and hopefully get an above average grade. The only thing that I am lacking is work experience as it is noted that they require at least two years.

    I have done business like ventures in the past for my sixth form, as well as working part time in high end retail and other small doses of work experience throughout the past few years but I have not got two solid years of proper corporate work experience. As I am hoping to apply for 2017 entry, I am applying for professional graduate jobs now and will hopefully work for a good year until I apply and past that too.

    I was wondering if anybody could advise me as to whether this might be enough to get into such a prestigious course or whether there is no point of me applying? Thanks!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    At the moment, you would be wasting your time applying. An MBA is designed to build on business experience and isn't purely an academic qualification. The Oxford MBA demands a minimum of two years' full-time relevant professional experience, so you won't get in straight from an undergrad degree with a school project and some part-time retail work:
    http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/programmes/d...n-requirements

    You need to have some kind of solid business - and potentially low-level management - experience for an MBA to build on. You would be better served by going out into the working world and getting to a position where an MBA would be useful and relevant. You may even find an employer which would sponsor you for an MBA, which would be enormously helpful given the high fees for these courses.
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    As @klix88 says, you won't be considered without at least a couple years of work experience.

    If you really want to do a management course have a look at MSc Management or MiM courses from good unis, they're designed for recent graduates without enough experience to get on an accredited MBA.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks both Is there no way that if I work from now up until September 2017 in the business field I will be considered? And is there any chance a high grade in the GMAT may counteract the lack of experience?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JusticeJunkie)
    Thanks both Is there no way that if I work from now up until September 2017 in the business field I will be considered? And is there any chance a high grade in the GMAT may counteract the lack of experience?
    You do realise the MBA at Oxford costs £50,000?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by physicsphysics91)
    You do realise the MBA at Oxford costs £50,000?
    I do, yes, my main concern is being considered haha. The finance I will find a way to take care of
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JusticeJunkie)
    Thanks both Is there no way that if I work from now up until September 2017 in the business field I will be considered? And is there any chance a high grade in the GMAT may counteract the lack of experience?
    Almost certainly not.
    Definitely not.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    Almost certainly not.
    Definitely not.
    Haha fair enough, Dreams = crushed
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JusticeJunkie)
    Hi everyone!

    I've just finished my Law degree (LLB) at the University of Sheffield to a good 2:1 standard which I am quite pleased about. I now feel like I would like to further my studies but I would not like to pursue anything more in Law as I don't think I could do it in my future.

    As I have always been interested in business and can see myself working in a business environment e.g sales or consultancy, I was hoping to apply for an MBA.

    Due to the lateness of my decision, I can't apply for 2016/2017 entry and will have to wait a few months to apply for the 2017 entry.

    The university I want to apply for is Oxford University.

    I'm wondering, if anyone has applied before or if anyone studies an MBA there currently, whether it is worth me applying with my current credentials?

    I have a solid 2:1 in Law at Uni of Sheff, I have good A-Levels (not that it counts probably lol), I am looking to take the GMAT and hopefully get an above average grade. The only thing that I am lacking is work experience as it is noted that they require at least two years.

    I have done business like ventures in the past for my sixth form, as well as working part time in high end retail and other small doses of work experience throughout the past few years but I have not got two solid years of proper corporate work experience. As I am hoping to apply for 2017 entry, I am applying for professional graduate jobs now and will hopefully work for a good year until I apply and past that too.

    I was wondering if anybody could advise me as to whether this might be enough to get into such a prestigious course or whether there is no point of me applying? Thanks!
    You've got this completely wrong to be saying all of this.

    An MBA is a post-experience qualification. Look at the most elite business institution in the UK - London Business School and they offer the MiM for non-experience students and the MBA is at minimum 3 years experience, as the case studies try to use previous experiences and how they would be done better.

    To be asking about an MBA at Oxford, again, completely wrong, as you wouldn't be considered at all.

    The most bizarre thing is that you have studied law for 3 years and then say proudly that you have a solid 2:1 but then that you know that you won't do anything with law in the future?! I'm beyond confused.

    A lot of lawyers go on to work in the City amongst the traders and bankers, finance requires a lot of contracts some of which are in tricky regulated areas so there is always plenty of work for a financially adept lawyer.

    A lawyer would find a lot of work and interest in mergers and acquisitions, which is an important part of business, as acquiring can really change the dynamic and position of business in a market.

    I would ultimately recommend the LL.M. in International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law at the Institute of Advaned Legal Studies at the University of London. You don't need a law degree to enter the course, you would find yourself amongst economists and management students.

    With a combination of a Sheffield LLB and the IALS LLM, I would be looking at HMRC Graduate programme (Taxation) which would lead into a great career in government: Treasury, FCO etc and after so many years 5-8 years minimum, there would put you in a great position for a career in the City: Goldman Sachs, Bank of England, Hedge Funds.. Hedge Funds particularly deal with keeping money in shadily regulated areas and would pay really really well and you would be working in Mayfair, they would love you so much for having an inside knowledge of how the government, (FCO and HMRC) and regulation works.

    Alternatively, I would recommend learning business or finance at masters level and the best I have seen in London would be Newcastle University's new London campus offering courses for £5900, which is fantastic as KCL and QMUL offer masters for 11k - so Banking and Finance or International Business Management.

    A law degree can be really useful for a career in sales, so pursuing masters might not be necessary.

    if you got moving, you could apply for September but there is nothing wrong with getting some work experience and having a long holiday and doing lot's of research into your preferred masters in September 2017.

    * The IALS LLM is accepting applications up to 31st August so clearly they have places for enthusiastic and bright students who can make most of the programme.

    ** Again another alternative and possible the most exciting is at ULIP - University of London in Paris, which now offers an LL.M. with which you can specialise in banking and finance law! ULIP LLM, taught in english which is delivered with Queen Mary in London

    To be able to live in Paris for a year and recent events of the Brexit won't be an issue to getting a student visa! Definitely something to consider seriously!

    ULIP LLM modules being:
    - Corporate Finance Law
    - Financial Models and Derivatives in a legal context
    - International Insolvency and Debt Restructuring
    - International Banking Law

    Paris is fascinating as a international financial centre and London would appreciate your experience of their twin sister.

    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JusticeJunkie)
    Haha fair enough, Dreams = crushed
    Oh come on. There's no reason you can't do an MBA at Oxford, I'm just saying you can't do one at the moment. A little bit of research would have told you that it's not possible, so you're the one who gave yourself unrealistic expectations.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by post-grad-u-ate)
    You've got this completely wrong to be saying all of this.

    An MBA is a post-experience qualification. Look at the most elite business institution in the UK - London Business School and they offer the MiM for non-experience students and the MBA is at minimum 3 years experience, as the case studies try to use previous experiences and how they would be done better.

    To be asking about an MBA at Oxford, again, completely wrong, as you wouldn't be considered at all.

    The most bizarre thing is that you have studied law for 3 years and then say proudly that you have a solid 2:1 but then that you know that you won't do anything with law in the future?! I'm beyond confused.

    A lot of lawyers go on to work in the City amongst the traders and bankers, finance requires a lot of contracts some of which are in tricky regulated areas so there is always plenty of work for a financially adept lawyer.

    A lawyer would find a lot of work and interest in mergers and acquisitions, which is an important part of business, as acquiring can really change the dynamic and position of business in a market.

    I would ultimately recommend the LL.M. in International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law at the Institute of Advaned Legal Studies at the University of London. You don't need a law degree to enter the course, you would find yourself amongst economists and management students.

    With a combination of a Sheffield LLB and the IALS LLM, I would be looking at HMRC Graduate programme (Taxation) which would lead into a great career in government: Treasury, FCO etc and after so many years 5-8 years minimum, there would put you in a great position for a career in the City: Goldman Sachs, Bank of England, Hedge Funds.. Hedge Funds particularly deal with keeping money in shadily regulated areas and would pay really really well and you would be working in Mayfair, they would love you so much for having an inside knowledge of how the government, (FCO and HMRC) and regulation works.

    Alternatively, I would recommend learning business or finance at masters level and the best I have seen in London would be Newcastle University's new London campus offering courses for £5900, which is fantastic as KCL and QMUL offer masters for 11k - so Banking and Finance or International Business Management.

    A law degree can be really useful for a career in sales, so pursuing masters might not be necessary.

    if you got moving, you could apply for September but there is nothing wrong with getting some work experience and having a long holiday and doing lot's of research into your preferred masters in September 2017.

    * The IALS LLM is accepting applications up to 31st August so clearly they have places for enthusiastic and bright students who can make most of the programme.

    ** Again another alternative and possible the most exciting is at ULIP - University of London in Paris, which now offers an LL.M. with which you can specialise in banking and finance law! ULIP LLM, taught in english which is delivered with Queen Mary in London

    To be able to live in Paris for a year and recent events of the Brexit won't be an issue to getting a student visa! Definitely something to consider seriously!

    ULIP LLM modules being:
    - Corporate Finance Law
    - Financial Models and Derivatives in a legal context
    - International Insolvency and Debt Restructuring
    - International Banking Law

    Paris is fascinating as a international financial centre and London would appreciate your experience of their twin sister.

    Thanks for the helpful answer! I will be considering these causes and do more research in what I want to go into
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    Oh come on. There's no reason you can't do an MBA at Oxford, I'm just saying you can't do one at the moment. A little bit of research would have told you that it's not possible, so you're the one who gave yourself unrealistic expectations.
    (Original post by JusticeJunkie)
    Thanks for the helpful answer! I will be considering these causes and do more research in what I want to go into
    To be honest, I haven't seen many law students go on to MBA's mostly economics, PPE, mathematics and some natural sciences and engineers.. law is so equally vital to the machinery of finance that it is a path all in itself.

    The legal counsel of a board of directors is a very important person - ensuring corporate governance and keeping with the latest rules on political, financial and legal regulation - as to what the company can do as to taxation, company law and cases like environmental law.

    You might find someone wanting to move on to managing partner status will pursue some executive education in these managerial topics but in a law firm will be a president in business development who is the accountant and corporate strategist covering competitors and pricing and marketing etc.

    What OP needs to do is figure out what is out there to connect a legal education with what is required of a lawyer's services..

    with a masters in management could put you in a good place to become a clerk in a barristers chambers as these positions usually go to eager legal graduates and not business administration so a combination of the two would be good and you could find yourself working at the most prestigious like Blackstone or on King's Bench Walk.

    Look at the world's largest law firms - all of which have a base in London and the United Kingdom.

    It is completely understandable if you want to work in a bank where they would have a dedicated legal section and not in a law firm where it is all law, law, law and a small section of accountants and marketing and HR etc, so in a bank you are more likely to be given the space and platform for your specialist knowledge and it's contribution than in a law firm where there are so many lawyers that other opinions might drown out yours.

    I will tell you a specialism in financial law that interests me and that is debt restructuring which you will find the boutiques such as Rothschild and Lazard and this debt could be sovereign so the debt of governments and could be dealing in the creation of contracts of transactions in the tens of billions. So gaining experience in this area at the Treasury and the FCO before heading off into the City and the Hedge Funds, this is possible with the IALS LLM and the ULIP LLM with the debt restructuring module. Rothschild want legal advice for their M&A advisory and their restructuring advisory, this could be for foreign banks, corporations or governments.

    Go back to the financial crisis, as much as the traders created all these crazy products to trade essentially creating some legalised gambling, it was the lawyers who created the contracts on all these derivatives who then were bogged down by the sheer scale of the circulation of trades that they just shrugged their shoulders and let the traders get on with it and got paid big bucks for doing nothing.
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by post-grad-u-ate)
    What OP needs to do is figure out what is out there to connect a legal education with what is required of a lawyer's services..
    OP said they weren't looking for a legal career. Your advice would be excellent if they were.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    OP said they weren't looking for a legal career. Your advice would be excellent if they were.
    I think OP needs to know where they want to go with their career - into the City and finance with a law degree is good to go with an LLM specialising in banking and financial law, especially the chance to study in Paris!

    OP said an MBA would be good to go on to consultancy but if a company wants legal advice they are not going to go to a management consultancy and I don't see how a law bachelors is any use to management consultancy.
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by post-grad-u-ate)
    I think OP needs to know where they want to go with their career - into the City and finance with a law degree is good to go with an LLM specialising in banking and financial law, especially the chance to study in Paris!

    OP said an MBA would be good to go on to consultancy but if a company wants legal advice they are not going to go to a management consultancy and I don't see how a law bachelors is any use to management consultancy.
    Agreed that OP needs to figure out where they want to go - they mentioned sales or consultancy so I read that as not wanting to stay in the legal world. Something like an MSc in Management would help bridge the gap into the business world.

    I wonder what careers advice they got while at uni - their careers service will still be available for advice, contacts, networking event, jobs etc. I'm sure he'll come back if he's got further questions.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    Agreed that OP needs to figure out where they want to go - they mentioned sales or consultancy so I read that as not wanting to stay in the legal world. Something like an MSc in Management would help bridge the gap into the business world.

    I wonder what careers advice they got while at uni - their careers service will still be available for advice, contacts, networking event, jobs etc. I'm sure he'll come back if he's got further questions.
    My university allowed on-going careers advice after graduation, so they would be more than welcoming to talk to a recent graduate within the first year of graduating for sure.

    OP should look for companies they wish to work for like Goldman Sachs and then legal and then linkedin and see what comes up on Google: Goldman Sachs legal linkedin, see what the linkedin profiles say about the cases that legal analysts are involved in.

    And do this thorough research on loads of different banks - JP Morgan, Schroders, commodities traders like Koch or mining companies like BP and Rio Tinto, BHP Billiton, so many.

    Law is a great degree to cross back and forth that line between business and government.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.