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Is someone actually going to trigger Article 50 or simply back out? Watch

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    I know that Boris Johnson's plan is to be prime minister, but that means he'll be expected to trigger Article 50... and he seems very unhappy about this as you can see from the way he's acting. (Original here)

    In fact, if I was to go so far, I could even suggest that Cameron has effectively annulled the referendum result, and simultaneously destroyed the political careers of Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and leading Brexiters who cost him so much anguish, not to mention his premiership.How?Throughout the campaign, Cameron had repeatedly said that a vote for leave would lead to triggering Article 50 straight away. Whether implicitly or explicitly, the image was clear: he would be giving that notice under Article 50 the morning after a vote to leave. Whether that was scaremongering or not is a bit moot now but, in the midst of the sentimental nautical references of his speech yesterday, he quietly abandoned that position and handed the responsibility over to his successor.

    And as the day wore on, the enormity of that step started to sink in: the markets, Sterling, Scotland, the Irish border, the Gibraltar border, the frontier at Calais, the need to continue compliance with all EU regulations for a free market, re-issuing passports, Brits abroad, EU citizens in Britain, the mountain of legistlation to be torn up and rewritten ... the list grew and grew.The referendum result is not binding. It is advisory. Parliament is not bound to commit itself in that same direction.The Conservative party election that Cameron triggered will now have one question looming over it: will you, if elected as party leader, trigger the notice under Article 50?Who will want to have the responsibility of all those ramifications and consequences on his/her head and shoulders?

    Boris Johnson knew this yesterday, when he emerged subdued from his home and was even more subdued at the press conference. He has been out-maneouvered and check-mated.If he runs for leadership of the party, and then fails to follow through on triggering Article 50, then he is finished. If he does not run and effectively abandons the field, then he is finished. If he runs, wins and pulls the UK out of the EU, then it will all be over - Scotland will break away, there will be upheaval in Ireland, a recession ... broken trade agreements. Then he is also finished. Boris Johnson knows all of this. When he acts like the dumb blond it is just that: an act.

    The Brexit leaders now have a result that they cannot use. For them, leadership of the Tory party has become a poison chalice.When Boris Johnson said there was no need to trigger Article 50 straight away, what he really meant to say was "never". When Michael Gove went on and on about "informal negotiations" ... why? why not the formal ones straight away? ... he also meant not triggering the formal departure. They both know what a formal demarche would mean: an irreversible step that neither of them is prepared to take.All that remains is for someone to have the guts to stand up and say that Brexit is unachievable in reality without an enormous amount of pain and destruction, that cannot be borne. And David Cameron has put the onus of making that statement on the heads of the people who led the Brexit campaign.
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    http://qz.com/717182/a-brexit-conspi...ds-himself-in/

    what a situation for BoJo eh
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    We have to leave.

    Even if it's clear the main Brexit partisans don't have a clue what to do now, as evidenced by the fact that they failed to provide a coherent post-Brexit vision in the campaign, the die has already been cast.

    The people have spoken and their will has to be respected. To do anything else would make a mockery of the democratic process.

    This just goes to show the folly of referendums.
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    I hope we don't execute order 66- er, article 50.

    It just enters us into another EU process, which doesn't make sense since we voted to leave.

    We should leave on our own terms.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    We have to leave.

    Even if it's clear the main Brexit partisans don't have a clue what to do now, as evidenced by the fact that they failed to provide a coherent post-Brexit vision in the campaign, the die has already been cast.

    The people have spoken and their will has to be respected. To do anything else would make a mockery of the democratic process.

    This just goes to show the folly of referendums.
    There are uninformed people in EVERY SINGLE VOTE. Every General, Local, By Election, every referendum.

    Why are people saying this is something exclusive to referendums? It's not. It is an intrinsic feature of democracy.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I hope we don't execute order 66- er, article 50.

    It just enters us into another EU process, which doesn't make sense since we voted to leave.

    We should leave on our own terms.
    You do realise we are obligated by treaty and that has to be formally ended?

    What do you mean by leaving on our own terms? That's the whole point of negotiating the exit. For us to leave properly it takes more than a vote and if we dont sort things out then it will be chaos.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    There are uninformed people in EVERY SINGLE VOTE. Every General, Local, By Election, every referendum.

    Why are people saying this is something exclusive to referendums? It's not. It is an intrinsic feature of democracy.
    But elections just set the general trajectory in which the country is heading.

    A referendum is a choice on a single political decision, and we elect politicians precisely to make those kinds of decisions. That's why we live in a representative democracy, and not a direct one.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    But elections just set the general trajectory in which the country is heading.

    A referendum is a choice on a single political decision, and we elect politicians precisely to make those kinds of decisions. That's why we live in a representative democracy, and not a direct one.
    a) Referendums are not as important as General Elections because referendums are not binding, but General Election results are
    b) We live in a representative democracy for practicality reasons first; our country is too large for direct democracy only
    c) It is important that there are elements of direct democracy in every political system. It makes people feels that they have an direct impact. I'm sure that after this referendum, there will be more political participation than before, and I'm sure that more people will think the government is legitimate too.
    d) The percentage of the national vote that the Leave campaign got (51.9%) is larger than what the Conservatives got in the 2015 General Election (36.9%). Its democratic legitimacy is undeniable. It got a much larger turnout than the 2015 General Election too (66.1%).
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    You do realise we are obligated by treaty and that has to be formally ended?

    What do you mean by leaving on our own terms? That's the whole point of negotiating the exit. For us to leave properly it takes more than a vote and if we dont sort things out then it will be chaos.
    Watch as we execute order 66 and the leave process drags out to 10 years,
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    They dont know what to do, boris looked confused as hell, wait till it actually happens, london will no longer be the financial centre of the world but a flooded zoo & sunderland even poorer
 
 
 
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