Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I am currently in Year 12, and it is getting close to when I must start choosing what I want to do at uni and writing my personal statement.

    I know how my exams have been, so I know I won't be predicted as high as A*AA, I think I should be predicted AAB.

    One of the main reasons why I am debating a History and Politics degree is because it interests me as much as Law does, and I know this as I do both subjects at A-level. Also, History and Politics degrees have lower entry requirements than Law, effectively allowing me to meet these for the universities I want to apply to. So I am looking for advice from current LLB Law students/ graduates or those who have done another undergraduate degree and then completed a GDL.

    I would generally like to know the benefits and drawbacks of both options, and answers to the questions below.

    Is it easier to get into Law by doing a GDL because of the lower entry requirements for History and Politics?

    How hard is the GDL?

    How do both options look to employers?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NK_26)
    I am currently in Year 12, and it is getting close to when I must start choosing what I want to do at uni and writing my personal statement.

    I know how my exams have been, so I know I won't be predicted as high as A*AA, I think I should be predicted AAB.

    One of the main reasons why I am debating a History and Politics degree is because it interests me as much as Law does, and I know this as I do both subjects at A-level. Also, History and Politics degrees have lower entry requirements than Law, effectively allowing me to meet these for the universities I want to apply to. So I am looking for advice from current LLB Law students/ graduates or those who have done another undergraduate degree and then completed a GDL.

    I would generally like to know the benefits and drawbacks of both options, and answers to the questions below.

    Is it easier to get into Law by doing a GDL because of the lower entry requirements for History and Politics?

    How hard is the GDL?

    How do both options look to employers?
    I don't really count but will be a Law student at the University of Manchester in September. History and Politics are both well respected and stringent subjects, so if you were to go with it, it will not be looked down at, especially if you attend a Russell Group uni (strongly recommended if you are looking to go into Law as a career). The major drawback is of course having to do the GDL; another year, more money. However, if you bag a TC before your undergrad is finished then the firm will pay your GDL and LPC fees. At Manchester, Law with Politics is still a qualifying Law degree and is entry grades AAB which is what you are looking at. Law and Politics are so intertwined just as History and Politics are, so if you could find some Law and Politics degrees that are still qualifying ones then it would save doing the GDL. If you do not have a passion for law as an academic subject (law is very different in practice) then I would not opt for Law and Politics as Law can be very dry and is extremely challenging. Many lawyers did not even do law degrees and firms are quick to assure people that not doing a law degree is not a bad thing at all. Obviously if it was a Micky mouse degree or something silly like Sociology then they would not be keen on that haha. The GDL, is an awful lot of work and some say even more work effort than your undergrad. I have a friend who went to Durham for Business Management and has just finished his GDL this year at ULaw. He definitely found it on the heavy side for work load as opposed to his degree. As far as I know he has a vac scheme lined up at Osborne Clarke's Bristol office this summer.
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    19
    Very Important Poster
    Doesnt really make a difference. Do the A levels where you get good grades.

    If you do the GDL, then its an extra year you may have to fund yourself, but hopefully your firm will pay. You are neither at an advantage or disadvantage for doing it. It can be quite intense.

    Its probably going to be easier getting a good grade in a degree you enjoy, but you dont know whether you will enjoy law or not.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ORW)
    I don't really count but will be a Law student at the University of Manchester in September. History and Politics are both well respected and stringent subjects, so if you were to go with it, it will not be looked down at, especially if you attend a Russell Group uni (strongly recommended if you are looking to go into Law as a career). The major drawback is of course having to do the GDL; another year, more money. However, if you bag a TC before your undergrad is finished then the firm will pay your GDL and LPC fees. At Manchester, Law with Politics is still a qualifying Law degree and is entry grades AAB which is what you are looking at. Law and Politics are so intertwined just as History and Politics are, so if you could find some Law and Politics degrees that are still qualifying ones then it would save doing the GDL. If you do not have a passion for law as an academic subject (law is very different in practice) then I would not opt for Law and Politics as Law can be very dry and is extremely challenging. Many lawyers did not even do law degrees and firms are quick to assure people that not doing a law degree is not a bad thing at all. Obviously if it was a Micky mouse degree or something silly like Sociology then they would not be keen on that haha. The GDL, is an awful lot of work and some say even more work effort than your undergrad. I have a friend who went to Durham for Business Management and has just finished his GDL this year at ULaw. He definitely found it on the heavy side for work load as opposed to his degree. As far as I know he has a vac scheme lined up at Osborne Clarke's Bristol office this summer.
    Thank you very much, I'll definitely look into joint honours degrees for law. Its still a hard choice for me to make, seeing as a downside of not taking LLB Law is that I won't be able to study optional modules, some of which may be very interesting.

    I suppose its between two subjects I love (have loved history since I can remember) or taking a leap of faith into the unknown. I am enthusiastic about studying law, but just wary that I might not love it as much as History and Politics.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Doesnt really make a difference. Do the A levels where you get good grades.

    If you do the GDL, then its an extra year you may have to fund yourself, but hopefully your firm will pay. You are neither at an advantage or disadvantage for doing it. It can be quite intense.

    Its probably going to be easier getting a good grade in a degree you enjoy, but you dont know whether you will enjoy law or not.
    But could the GDL suggest that I have less of an interest in law? This is not the case, by the way.
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by NK_26)
    But could the GDL suggest that I have less of an interest in law? This is not the case, by the way.
    Makes little difference when it comes to training contracts. They tend to take equally from them although I dont know the exact numbers of applicants. Its competitive, just up to you to be near the top of the pile.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NK_26)
    Thank you very much, I'll definitely look into joint honours degrees for law. Its still a hard choice for me to make, seeing as a downside of not taking LLB Law is that I won't be able to study optional modules, some of which may be very interesting.

    I suppose its between two subjects I love (have loved history since I can remember) or taking a leap of faith into the unknown. I am enthusiastic about studying law, but just wary that I might not love it as much as History and Politics.
    I cant talk for other Russell Group unis but at Manchester there is an excellent range of optional modules in the LLB as below.

    Human Rights; Company Law and Partnership; Criminal Justice; Law, Gender and Sexuality; Employment Law; Mental Health Law; Principles of Law, Medicine and Ethics; Medicine, Technology, Morals and the Law; Criminal Evidence; Family Law and Relationships; Law of Freedom of Expression; Counter Terrorism; Insurance Law; Youth Justice and Juvenile Delinquency; Consumer Law; Sale and Supply of Goods; Environmental Law; Constitutional Reform; Modern Constitutionalism; Prosecution and Pre-trial Process; Intellectual Property Law; Public International Law; Sentencing and Penal Policy; Miscarriages of Justice; Law and Ethics in War and Warfare; Education Law; Policing and the Police; Drugs and Society; International Courts and Tribunals; Legal History; Competition Law in an International Context; Commercial Law and Regulation; Religion, Law and Society; International Economic Law; Advocacy and the Law; Law, Literature and Art; and Law and Social Theory.

    Possibly something to consider if you decide on a straight LLB in the end. There is something to fit every interest and some great ones if you want do to corporate/commercial. Thats at Manchester anyway, other Russell Group unis also have great optional law modules

    It may be harder with the GDL to demonstrate an interest in Law but joining and partaking in the law society at whatever uni you end up at will partially help
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    19
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by NK_26)
    Thank you very much, I'll definitely look into joint honours degrees for law. Its still a hard choice for me to make, seeing as a downside of not taking LLB Law is that I won't be able to study optional modules, some of which may be very interesting.

    I suppose its between two subjects I love (have loved history since I can remember) or taking a leap of faith into the unknown. I am enthusiastic about studying law, but just wary that I might not love it as much as History and Politics.
    Do as suggested and find a joint course with law and history. You are likely to get far fewer options if it means the law part is a qdl. I dont really see the problem of doing a non law degree, except it gives you a more in depth knowledge and you get to know first hand whether you like to as a subject.

    What one person finds interesting another might find tedious. This goes for law at any stage.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.