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    For those who had the earth moved for you in 2002 here is a list of all the quakes that happened.

    http://www.quakes.bgs.ac.uk/manchester_event_list.htm

    Yes I am that bored!:confused:
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    will you ever move out of manchester?
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    will you ever move out of manchester?
    lol dont be silly
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    For those who had the earth moved for you in 2002 here is a list of all the quakes that happened.

    http://www.quakes.bgs.ac.uk/manchester_event_list.htm

    Yes I am that bored!:confused:
    :confused:
    You must be really *really* bored!
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    They were quite big news at the time, I got woken by them a few times, I remember being a lecture and the whole room shook quite badly. Everything paused for 5 minutes, when we went out we half expect rubble every where, there wasn't up damage but later I found out the lecture theatre was just a few hundered yards from the epicentre.
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    If you think you have it bad try going to a place that's actually near plate boundaries. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    If you think you have it bad try going to a place that's actually near plate boundaries. :rolleyes:
    Is this abroad or is there some where like that in the UK? I didn't think therewas any bounderies in the UK.

    It wasn't bad really, it was actually a good experience because we had plenty of warning about it.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Is this abroad or is there some where like that in the UK? I didn't think therewas any bounderies in the UK.

    It wasn't bad really, it was actually a good experience because we had plenty of warning about it.
    How can you have warning for an earthquake? :confused:
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    (Original post by Cate)
    How can you have warning for an earthquake? :confused:
    They can predict where the tectonics plates are, they have somthing ometre's (siezeometre??) its years since I last studied it.

    Anyway these measure minor quakes very small on the richer scale, these are then used as a warning, the more frequent they become the more likely a big one is going to happen.

    No real damage was caused in the Manchester ones other than a few cracks here and there.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Is this abroad or is there some where like that in the UK? I didn't think therewas any bounderies in the UK.
    lol i did mean abroad, i'm not stupid, it's not like i believe that Bath is at risk of a scale 8 on the richter scale earthquake!
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    lol i did mean abroad, i'm not stupid, it's not like i believe that Bath is at risk of a scale 8 on the richter scale earthquake!
    Lol I am not sure what caused the Manchester ones, I think its somthing to do with the plates moving in the North Sea and the fact it was a built up city which puts weight on the ground or somthing. I don't really understand it.

    I really regret not being able to study A level geography:mad:
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    (Original post by amazingrade)
    I really regret not being able to study A level geography
    Well i did GCSE geography, i can tell you why the Andes were formed, but not about this, sorry.
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    Well i did GCSE geography, i can tell you why the Andes were formed, but not about this, sorry.
    I only did GCSE Geography too, I was more interested in the human side of at the time, but now I am more interested in Geology. Like when I see rivers and spend time trying work out how it was formed and stuff. I sound really sad now:mad:
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Lol I am not sure what caused the Manchester ones, I think its somthing to do with the plates moving in the North Sea and the fact it was a built up city which puts weight on the ground or somthing. I don't really understand it.

    I really regret not being able to study A level geography:mad:
    lol, I think they happened cos there is a fault line there, and they slip every now and then causing and earthquake.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I only did GCSE Geography too, I was more interested in the human side of at the time, but now I am more interested in Geology. Like when I see rivers and spend time trying work out how it was formed and stuff. I sound really sad now
    lol i never got on with geography, i only got an A in my mock, though i was only 1% of A*, but still....

    I've always liked the physical side more, tectonics, rivers and coasts, you don't sound really sad to me at least, though now both of us probably do to everybody else.
 
 
 
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