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Photography experts, which wide angle lens is the best here? Watch

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    I need one for an event i'm attending in 2 weeks time.

    1) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tokina-AT-X...+11-16mm+canon

    2) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sigma-10-20...=sigma+10-20mm

    3) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sigma-10-20...=sigma+10-20mm

    Thanks.
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    If this event involves low light shooting or you plan on doing low light shooting in general, get the Tokina for its f2.8 constant aperture. I used to use this lens whenni shot on Canon and it was great. If low light isn't a priority, the extra reach of the Sigmas could be more useful and let's the lens operate more as a general purpose lens, going from ultra-wide through to almost the "standard" 35mm equivalent at 20mm (20mm X 1.6 crop equals 32mm). I don't know which of the two you've linked to is supposed to be technically better, so have a read around.

    If I could also suggest a fourth option, I would strongly recommend looking into the Canon 10-18mm IS STM. It's stupidly sharp for the price and image stabilised, and for the price of those other lenses you could pick up the Canon, a Yongnuo flash and even another one of Canon's excellent "plastic fantastic" STM lenses like 50mm 1.8 or 55-250mm. Or you could just save some cash.

    All of those options have their advantages and all will produce nice sharp images, so it's just a case of picking the one that sounds like it fits your needs best :yep:
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    If this event involves low light shooting or you plan on doing low light shooting in general, get the Tokina for its f2.8 constant aperture. I used to use this lens whenni shot on Canon and it was great. If low light isn't a priority, the extra reach of the Sigmas could be more useful and let's the lens operate more as a general purpose lens, going from ultra-wide through to almost the "standard" 35mm equivalent at 20mm (20mm X 1.6 crop equals 32mm). I don't know which of the two you've linked to is supposed to be technically better, so have a read around.

    If I could also suggest a fourth option, I would strongly recommend looking into the Canon 10-18mm IS STM. It's stupidly sharp for the price and image stabilised, and for the price of those other lenses you could pick up the Canon, a Yongnuo flash and even another one of Canon's excellent "plastic fantastic" STM lenses like 50mm 1.8 or 55-250mm. Or you could just save some cash.

    All of those options have their advantages and all will produce nice sharp images, so it's just a case of picking the one that sounds like it fits your needs best :yep:
    Hiya mate, excellent advice as usual.

    Initially i was after the sigma with the fixed 3.5 aperture but someone pointed out the Tokina to me. I should mention that i'll be buying secondhand and my budget is £200 maximum. I came across this list and it's at the top with the Tokina surprisingly being at the bottom.
    http://www.techradar.com/news/photog...lens-1307770/2

    It's limited range is a little off putting though.

    That Canon 10-18 also looks decent. The aperture isn't all that appealing though but for the price i can't exactly complain. There's a cashback with Canon so i could pick one up for about £160 brand new. The event i'll be photographing will be in broad daylight so that won't be a problem although i'd like to use it for night photography of buildings and bridges e.t.c

    Do you think image stabilisation is important with a wide angle lens? Will the lack of it cause me problems? I have it on my 18-55 and it works fine. Also how do filters improve photographs and are they worth it?
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    (Original post by Silver Arrow)
    Hiya mate, excellent advice as usual. Initially i was after the sigma with the fixed 3.5 aperture but someone pointed out the Tokina to me. I should mention that i'll be buying secondhand and my budget is £200 maximum. I came across this list and it's at the top with the Tokina surprisingly being at the bottom. http://www.techradar.com/news/photog...lens-1307770/2 It's limited range is a little off putting though. That Canon 10-18 also looks decent. The aperture isn't all that appealing though but for the price i can't exactly complain. There's a cashback with Canon so i could pick one up for about £160 brand new. The event i'll be photographing will be in broad daylight so that won't be a problem although i'd like to use it for night photography of buildings and bridges e.t.c Do you think image stabilisation is important with a wide angle lens? Will the lack of it cause me problems? I have it on my 18-55 and it works fine. Also how do filters improve photographs and are they worth it?
    I'm not overly familiar with Techradar's camera journalism (although outside of dedicated photography sites I've found it to be a very hit-or-miss part of most Tech sites), so I can't comment on the quality of that list. All I would say is The Digital Picture have an excellent lens comparison tool that lets you see first hand how different lenses compare. to choose identical camera bodies where possible.

    If you're shooting in broad daylight then ideally you won't need to shoot the lens wide open, whichever option you decide (lenses get sharper as you "stop down" to larger aperture numbers), and if you want to take photos of static objects like architecture at night, you can use longer shutter speeds instead. This is where image stabilisation can come in handy with ultra-wides and you can use fairly long shutter speeds while handheld, although a tripod will always be superior.

    *There are numerous types of filters that all do different things. The main ones being;
    *UV Filters: Largely just used to protect the lens from damage without (overly) influencing image quality.
    *ND filters: Used to block out light to allow for longer shutter speeds or wider apertures without overexposing. For example I use a 6 stop ND filter, which lets me keep my shutter open long enough that the image would be overexposed by 6 stops if I didn't use it. There are also graduated ND filters, which only lower the exposure of a certain portion of the frame (for example to stop the sky being blown out against a darker foreground)
    *Polarising filters are primarily used to cut glare and reduce reflections in water, but also have the effect of making images more contrasty and saturated. Useful for the glare/reflections, but the changes to colour are better achieved by shooting RAW and editing in post.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    I'm not overly familiar with Techradar's camera journalism (although outside of dedicated photography sites I've found it to be a very hit-or-miss part of most Tech sites), so I can't comment on the quality of that list. All I would say is The Digital Picture have an excellent lens comparison tool that lets you see first hand how different lenses compare. to choose identical camera bodies where possible.

    If you're shooting in broad daylight then ideally you won't need to shoot the lens wide open, whichever option you decide (lenses get sharper as you "stop down" to larger aperture numbers), and if you want to take photos of static objects like architecture at night, you can use longer shutter speeds instead. This is where image stabilisation can come in handy with ultra-wides and you can use fairly long shutter speeds while handheld, although a tripod will always be superior.

    *There are numerous types of filters that all do different things. The main ones being;
    *UV Filters: Largely just used to protect the lens from damage without (overly) influencing image quality.
    *ND filters: Used to block out light to allow for longer shutter speeds or wider apertures without overexposing. For example I use a 6 stop ND filter, which lets me keep my shutter open long enough that the image would be overexposed by 6 stops if I didn't use it. There are also graduated ND filters, which only lower the exposure of a certain portion of the frame (for example to stop the sky being blown out against a darker foreground)
    *Polarising filters are primarily used to cut glare and reduce reflections in water, but also have the effect of making images more contrasty and saturated. Useful for the glare/reflections, but the changes to colour are better achieved by shooting RAW and editing in post.
    I got the Canon in the end. From those filters, a polarising one is the one i need the most now IMO. I've read however that you shouldn't use them on a wide angle lens as they can cause lots of problems.

    However i think i might get one for my 18-55. Can they only be used in sunny conditions or in all of them? I have no photo editing software atm.
 
 
 
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