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    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    Choose Chemistry since you said you prefer it more than Biology. As long as you manage your time effectively you will do well in any subject. The work load depends on your sixth form (some such as mine give you triple the amount of homework compared to other schools).
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    Choose Chemistry since you said you prefer it more than Biology. As long as you manage your time effectively you will do well in any subject. The work load depends on your sixth form (some such as mine give you triple the amount of homework compared to other schools).
    What if I'm relatively okay at maths? My maths teacher predicted for me to get an A but I personally don't think I'm capable of achieving that grade so my personal target is a B. However I enjoy the maths involved in chemistry like moles and concentration and whatnot but I'm aware there'll be a difference in the style of questions at gcse and a level
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    Biology... you will thank me later
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    (Original post by SuperHuman98)
    Biology... you will thank me later
    I hate revising plant biology but I have a feeling you might be right
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    I took both at AS chemistry is so hard but if you find it easier than biology its probably the route to go. Take what you like and what you are good at you have two years of it 😄 I take the current aqa course with the as and a2 there is relatively little plant biology whether that still stands I'm not sure
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    Biology is easier but much more tedious. You won't escape the plants.
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    Biology involves writing essays. Chemistry doesn't. Enough said.
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    (Original post by 1998RF)
    I took both at AS chemistry is so hard but if you find it easier than biology its probably the route to go. Take what you like and what you are good at you have two years of it 😄 I take the current aqa course with the as and a2 there is relatively little plant biology whether that still stands I'm not sure
    It's not exactly that I found chemistry easier than biology, I just enjoyed it more (so in a way that did make it easier because it meant I could learn the content quicker). I'm from Northern Ireland so ccea will be my exam board if I do a level chemistry or biology, but there's an even mix between human and plant bio
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    First of all, taking a science for the sake of "variety" isn't necessarily a good idea, although in this case I do think it could be useful because you're applying for psychology which is quite sciency. If you prefer Chemistry over Biology then I'd recommend going with Chemistry. There's no two ways about it: it is a hard A Level. But you're more likely to do well in it if you're interested in it. I personally thought that Chemistry was one of the most interesting A Levels I took.
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    It's not exactly that I found chemistry easier than biology, I just enjoyed it more (so in a way that did make it easier because it meant I could learn the content quicker). I'm from Northern Ireland so ccea will be my exam board if I do a level chemistry or biology, but there's an even mix between human and plant bio
    That sounds horrible. I also hate plant biology 😁😄
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    Biology... Chemistry is soooo hard at A level. I also preferred it to bio at GCSE's but when I actually studied it at AS level, I absolutely hated it. For Biology just keep on top of your work and you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    What if I'm relatively okay at maths? My maths teacher predicted for me to get an A but I personally don't think I'm capable of achieving that grade so my personal target is a B. However I enjoy the maths involved in chemistry like moles and concentration and whatnot but I'm aware there'll be a difference in the style of questions at gcse and a level
    Are you talking about Maths in A-level or the Maths in Chem? If its the latter you really shouldn't worry as the Maths is pretty much GCSE stuff. You will learn some A-level maths calculations such as logarithms, but not to A-level standards at all.
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    I would say do biology because it's considered the easiest of the sciences by most. Also, I have many intelligent friends who took bio and chem and it's scary to see how such smart people ended up with a D grade at GCSE...
    Also, biology is much more relevant to psychology and will become very useful when you do biopsycology
    Also, there is still quite a bit of maths involved in chemistry at A-level and was rated the hardest A-level.
    If I were you I'd do biology because it's more useful for psychology; it's easier; it comes down to just having to remember things; it's still very highly respected
    One last thing, my biology teacher said to me that at A-level and beyond, biology slowly becomes chemistry so you'll find you'll be doing some chemistry in biology anyway!
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    My friends who have taken both say that biology is much easier. Chemistry (apparently) gets much much harder at A level than GCSE and many of my friends who previously enjoyed it now hate it and regularly achieve Us. It's also virtually essential (though not completely necessary) to be doing maths, if you want to do Chemistry so bear that in mind. However, if you feel that you can cope then go for it.
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    Having completed both Biology and chemistry ALevels as of last week I feel like I can sympathise. I got a higher UMS in chemistry than biology at GCSE but I am much better at biology now. Chemistry is difficult but interesting and once you understand the concepts it's not too bad. But it may take a long time to get to the point where you can understand it. Biology on the other hand I find much easier as you literally just have to memorise pages and pages of text and you don't really need to understand it but be able to regurgitate it. Chemistry would provide a challenge and be more interesting but biology would probably be easier
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    I think you are better off doing biology since you like written exams. Psychology and history require lots of writing so it should be no problem in biology. There is last unit at the end of 2nd year where you will have to write a synoptic essay - it means it covers all the units which require lots to remember. Try out in the first week on both chemistry and biology and see which one you enjoy the most. Good luck!

    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    At A level, both were pretty easy but Chem was for sure more interesting imo. Depends what spec you're doing but AQA Biol modules were terrible other than Biol 5? Also, depends what course and what uni you want to go to, I wouldn't just do a science for the sake of looking rounded if I didn't like the subject and my future course didn't need it anyway?

    Ps to counter said horror story, A* at GCSE and A* at A level :) Had the same Chem teacher for most of school and sixth form and he oozed awesomeness!
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I just finished my GCSEs and now I'm having second thoughts about my A-Level subject choices. I know for definite that I'm doing psychology and history, however, I've read that uni's like to see a variety of subjects and therefore I would like to study a science.
    I've completely ruled out physics because I deteste it but I genuinely enjoyed chemistry and biology at GCSE (chemistry more than biology, if I'm honest).
    I've heard many stories about both subjects and how some people who achieved A*s in GCSE Chemistry ended up failing at a level, which scares me a lot.
    I need ABB to study psychology at my desired uni. I enjoy school and I'm motivated and committed to put in the work to try achieve these grades but I've heard the jump from GCSE to A-Level is large.
    I would really appreciate replies from people who are studying/studied one or both subjects - how they're coping with the workload and which science they would recommend!
    In my opinion, since you said you enjoy Chemistry more than Biology, it seems more obvious to choose Chemistry over Biology. However, that being said, I'd look in the content of the specification for each of the subjects & see which one appeals to you the most. Do some research. Also make sure that you are choosing the subject because you enjoy it not because universities want a candidate with a science A-Level.

    I take Chemistry for A-Level (since I hate Biology) and I got a Grade B at GCSE-trust me, the jump is huge but if you work hard, make notes and review them as soon as you get home and as often as possible(as well as doing past papers), there's absolutely no reason why you can't get a good grade. GCSE grades don't really matter too much-there's some people with A's & A*'s who struggle with Chemistry and those with B's & Cs who may find it easy (and vice versa). It really all depends on your dedication to the subject. AS-Level Chemistry is not easy- the same could be said for Biology (AS Biology students, correct me if I'm wrong). You'll still have to work hard anyway irrespective of that GCSE grade.

    I also do Psychology as well- trust me when I say just because you don't have any science subjects doesn't mean you have a less of an advantage over those scientists, you'll still have to work hard regardless of what subjects you take. In Psychology, you do cover Biopsychology (my least favourite part of the course but nevertheless compulsory) so it does have some Biology content- I'm not in any way behind because I don't take Biology. It's a good idea to read around each of the topics anyway to get a good idea of what you're expected to learn.

    Hope this helps!
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    I definitely think its worth looking at the A-level syllabus' for each, and perhaps watching some Youtube videos on the topics to make sure that you find the content interesting enough to want to put in a lot of work outside of class. I loved chemistry at gcse so I chose it for A-level but ended up hating the content (AQA new spec) and didn't enjoy it at all so ended up dropping it a few months into the year.

    I did read through the syllabus before picking it but I didn't bother looking deeper into the content so I was like "yeah, that sounds interesting" but when I had to actually go into greater depth, i did not find it interesting. It totally depends on you as a person whether you'll enjoy it or not but its best to make sure first, rather than finding out the hard way. The same goes for biology I guess.

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