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    So I'm taking A-level AQA Biology next year on the linear course and I need some advice as to which would be the best text book to buy? Also, I have been told by past bio students at my school that learning from the textbook will limit me to around a C grade. What else could I do to achieve the top grades?? A-levels are very different to GCSE as I'm now discovering!
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    (Original post by EverythingGreen)
    So I'm taking A-level AQA Biology next year on the linear course and I need some advice as to which would be the best text book to buy? Also, I have been told by past bio students at my school that learning from the textbook will limit me to around a C grade. What else could I do to achieve the top grades?? A-levels are very different to GCSE as I'm now discovering!
    I found (for GCSE AQA) printing off the specs and actually understanding what the exam board want you to say really helped me, especially for AQA because the mark scheme is so strict
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    I've just finished A2 biology so I might be able to offer some advice. Firstly, A level biology is very specific - mark schemes often require key terms such as 'a substrate is complementary to an active site, to which it binds, forming an enzyme substrate complex' is necessary to obtain marks - simply writing 'a substrate binds to an active site' would not get you the marks. So my 1st tip would be to learn mark schemes in detail and recognise what key terms you should be using in certain questions. Secondly, A level biology is one of the most content heavy A levels. I advise you utilise books (I used AQA Collins and I'm expecting an A on results day) but don't copy the book word for word, condense information so you learn only the necessary information. For example, the Collins book contains a lot of irrelevant nonsense e.g. The specific enzyme involved in DNA splicing.

    A level biology is interesting but requires a lot of work, be sure you start reading through your notes every night after each lesson to stay on top of the workload otherwise you'll start to feel overwhelmed. Good luck!


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    (Original post by Sacred Ground)
    I've just finished A2 biology so I might be able to offer some advice. Firstly, A level biology is very specific - mark schemes often require key terms such as 'a substrate is complementary to an active site, to which it binds, forming an enzyme substrate complex' is necessary to obtain marks - simply writing 'a substrate binds to an active site' would not get you the marks. So my 1st tip would be to learn mark schemes in detail and recognise what key terms you should be using in certain questions. Secondly, A level biology is one of the most content heavy A levels. I advise you utilise books (I used AQA Collins and I'm expecting an A on results day) but don't copy the book word for word, condense information so you learn only the necessary information. For example, the Collins book contains a lot of irrelevant nonsense e.g. The specific enzyme involved in DNA splicing.

    A level biology is interesting but requires a lot of work, be sure you start reading through your notes every night after each lesson to stay on top of the workload otherwise you'll start to feel overwhelmed. Good luck!


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    Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by EverythingGreen)
    So I'm taking A-level AQA Biology next year on the linear course and I need some advice as to which would be the best text book to buy? Also, I have been told by past bio students at my school that learning from the textbook will limit me to around a C grade. What else could I do to achieve the top grades?? A-levels are very different to GCSE as I'm now discovering!
    -Don't spend most of your revision time making notes. It's best to make all of it at the start of the course (you can find lots of notes you'l need online)
    -When making notes, it's best to skip all the unnecessary words (basically half of the textbook) and write only what's important (recommend doing bullet points)
    -Spend more time doing questions and testing your knowledge (using past paper questions by topic)
    -Develop a good study routine consisting of questions, and also revisit things you've learnt throughout the year. This way, everything you learnt will stay in your head
    -If you truly can't get your head around a particular concept, try talking to your teacher or asking someone here on the Biology forum to explain to you
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    (Original post by EverythingGreen)
    So I'm taking A-level AQA Biology next year on the linear course and I need some advice as to which would be the best text book to buy? Also, I have been told by past bio students at my school that learning from the textbook will limit me to around a C grade. What else could I do to achieve the top grades?? A-levels are very different to GCSE as I'm now discovering!
    - Past papers key if you want A/A*
    - The textbooks are useful but they will not teach you exam technique. They will provide you with the knowledge and information you need for the exam. If I remember correctly, the most common book that the teacher will use for classes is the nelson thornes book. They may have changed possibly since when I was at sixth form though.
    - *The revision book I would recommend is this (I used this book but the old spec version, they have now brought out a new spec which is the one I've attached the link for) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Biology-Stu...8Q2752Z6160Q4V

    I did AQA a level biology when I was in sixth form and really enjoyed it. It is definitely a jump up from GCSE but it's manageable. If you have any more questions feel free to ask. Good luck!
 
 
 
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