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Science Foundation Year - One of the easiest routes into University. Watch

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    I studied the Science foundation year course at Kingston College during 2014/2015.

    I'll just do this post in a Q & A format, since it will probably be more useful for those who have questions about the course.
    Note: This is an unofficial Q & A post based on my personal experience.



    Q.1) I applied for the Science Foundation Year, where is it?
    A.1) You should be told by email and/or through UCAS where it will be taught. Most will get taught it at Kingston College.
    However, it's possible you may be taught it exclusively at Kingston University (Penrhyn road campus).
    My friends who were taught it at the University complained that they weren't as organised as the College and that the teachers followed instructions set by the college teachers, as it was the college teachers who decided what would appear in the exams and whatnot.

    Q. 2) As a UK student, how much will it cost me? Will Student Finance cover the cost?
    A.1) As of 2016, it costs £6,000. When I did it in 2014/2015, it cost £4600.
    If you're eligible for student finance, then yes, they should cover the foundation year along with all subsequent years (when you actually enter University with your desired course).

    Q. 3) I picked a specific science course (e.g: Chemistry), can I change my mind to another Science course (e.g: Biomedical science) later on?
    A. 3) Yes you can. You should be able to transfer onto another Kingston University Science course if you pass the Science foundation year course (40%+ in all modules).
    However, If you want to get into Pharmacy, you will need 70%+ overall and (possibly) 60%+ in Chemistry & Biology.
    If you don't, you can still ask the staff whether you're still eligible or not. If the University is feeling lenient/they have space, they might let you through even if you don't meet the requirements.

    Q. 4) Can I apply to other Universities (via UCAS) based on the Science foundation year course?
    A. 4) Yes, you should be able to for most Universities (not the top Universities though). Make sure to ring the other Universities first to ask if they accept the Science Foundation year course at Kingston University as an alternative route for doing a science course at their University.
    You should apply to other courses (via UCAS) the moment you've enrolled into this Science foundation course. You'll most likely be interviewed later in the year. Assuming you pass the interview, the other Universities (like Hertfordshire) may expect a higher passing percentage on average though. So instead of 40% which Kingston requires, they may expect an average of 50%. They may require you to have some A-Level grades too.If you stick with Kingston University, you'll not be interviewed (unless you want to go into Pharmacy) and everything afterwards is done internally. So you don't ever need to use UCAS again, after being enrolled into the Science foundation year course if you stick with Kingston University.

    Q. 5) Can I retake if I fail the year?
    A. 5) Depends on how many modules you fail. If you've failed any modules, speak to your course leader and/or your personal tutor immediately after receiving your results.
    From what I've seen though, if you fail 1 or 2, shortly after the results are released, you'll be informed (on Moodle) that you can re-take the entire module(s) (new retake exam & new retake courseworks). They have a similar standard at the University, although instead of 'Moodle' everything is done on 'Studyspace'.

    Q. 6) Do you believe this course is easier than A-Level science courses?
    A. 6) Most definitely! Just to put things into perspective, if you can get E at A-levels in Maths/Science subjects, you're most likely going to easily pass this course. Heck, if you can get D at AS Maths/Science subjects, you'll still find this course relatively easy. However that's not to say you should lack off. Make sure to attend as many lectures as possible. There is no point increasing your chances of failing just because you're too lazy to show up to the lectures (no matter how easy you may think they are). All the students I know that got into Pharmacy, were the people who showed up to as many lectures as possible.

    Q. 7) How much did you revise before the exams?
    A. 7) The night before the exams, for all of them. I didn't revise anything at home, or at University/College outside of lectures/classes.
    I put in the same effort for GCSE's too. So I mainly got all A's and B's while only studying the night before an exam.

    If I had known the exams were this easy in the Science foundation course & University, I may have put in more effort to get into Pharmacy. I think even revising a little can make a huge difference. As the revision material is actually relevant to what appears in the exams- I never felt this way at all during A-levels. Additionally, I've only recently realised that University isn't much more difficult than Science foundation year.

    Q. 8) How many lectures/classes did you attend?
    A. 8) My attendance was ~95%. Attendance is recorded. If your attendance drops too low (below 50%), you might be kicked from the course and/or not be allowed re-takes, if you end up failing any modules. I was probably one of the very few students who attended nearly every single lecture.
    Think of it this way. If you can average 95% attendance, you're guaranteed to pass all the modules (I had 4 modules in total).
    Furthermore, make sure you do well in all courseworks. Ask your fellow peers for help. However, don't just email your work to them. Make sure you both do the work yourselves and then in person, show your work to each other (print it out). This should prevent plagiarism from both parties, at the same time you both can learn from each other and improve your own coursework.
    Getting good marks in the coursework will significantly reduce your stress, as you won't have to worry as much for the final exams.

    Q. 9) Which course was the hardest? Why?
    A. 9) Without a doubt, it was Biology. The lectures are extremely boring, especially late in the afternoon and they cover so much material. They try to cram AS and A2 Biology into a single year.
    What makes this a joke is that the final exam is so simple. So ~90% of the stuff you're taught will not appear in the exam. Do not feel bad if you go into the lecture, and you don't remember a single thing that was said.
    Chemistry was the second most difficult. It mostly consists of AS chemistry, with a couple of parts coming from A2 chemistry. Basically, most of the easier parts from A-Level Chemistry, so don't worry if you failed A-Level Chemistry.

    Q. 10) Which course was the easiest? Why?
    A. 10) Maths. I got A in GCSE Maths. The Maths in this course literally starts from primary school level and then works it way up to AS Maths (near the end). If you know the basics, you'll find this course almost a joke. I got my 14 year old cousin (who got level 6 in KS3 Maths) to do the final exam (past paper), and he managed to pass with ~50% (I was supervising over him, to prevent him from cheating). That pretty much says it all. I had already passed the course without needing to do the final exam (I had 45% out of 50% before the final exam).

    Q. 11) Could you use University facilities as well as the College facilities?
    A. 11) Yes I could. There are a 'help' lessons, which specifically help you integrate with the University. You basically have access to the University, just like anyone else who is studying at the University. The staff will constantly mention this, just so you feel like a University student. So don't feel pessimistic if you do end up studying at the college, because you still are a University student. Don't let anybody else tell you otherwise.

    Q. 12) What did you generally think of the lectures?
    A. 12) Most of them are decent. However, I had this one teacher, who was new to the job (teaching biology). She was pretty incompetent. If you want help, make sure to email them. They should reply back to you pretty fast (within 48 hours). Don't expect much from them though, it's not like 6th Form at A-Levels. They don't care too much whether you pass or not. If you don't pay attention, you're losing out, not them.

    Q. 13) What is the best way to revise?
    A. 13) During my time, they used a system called 'Moodle' to keep us updated. The chemistry teacher made sure to keep things up to date. Whereas the other subjects were not very organised. You'll also submit courseworks on 'Moodle'. When I revised one day before an exam, I just read up on the powerpoints posted on Moodle by the lecturers. It was extremely useful to quickly read up on the topics I was unsure about.
    I wouldn't recommend buying any books. Just borrow from the library (either the College or University). If you can't get it, don't bother unless you want to get into Pharmacy.

    Q. 14) Is the foundation course similar to your University course?
    A. 14) Based on personal experience, yes it is. I'm currently doing 'Pharmaceutical Science'. The foundation course definitely has a lot of traits which are similar to my course.
    The difficulty is similar too. If you do well in the foundation year, you'll probably do just as well (if not better) during University (first year). I can only speak for my course though, I'm not sure about the other courses that have more biology.

    Q. 15) What results did you get during the foundation year?
    A. 15) Maths: ~75%. Skills: ~75%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~45%.

    Q. 16) What results did you get during your first year at University (Pharmaceutical Science)?
    A. 16) Molecular Skills: ~80%. Spectroscopy: ~80%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~60%.

    Q. 17) Overall experience?
    A. 17) If you're a mature student and/or somebody who has been out of education for quite some time (3+ years), this course will definitely help you refresh and it's worth doing it.
    I wasn't a mature student though. I came directly after not getting the required A-Level grades. I must say, this course is a much easier route into University than A-Levels.
    I'd say the foundation year difficulty wise, is the same as doing Science and Math at GCSE (while achieving B in GCSE at minimum).
    You can fail the final exams, yet still pass due to good coursework marks, which makes this course an extremely easy route to get into University. Honestly, I don't think a single student who manages to attend 90%+ lectures should fail any modules.
    The hardest challenge is attending all the lectures. Commuting took me roughly 2 hours (2 trains and 2 buses).
    As my UCAS points were below 160, there was no way I was going to get into any University to do my desired course. So I'm extremely thankful that this course exists for lazy people like me, who struggle to revise due to procrastination and/or other personal reasons.
    I've applied to live out for my 2nd year (3rd year, if you count foundation year) at University (1st year doesn't count towards your degree grade, 2nd and 3rd year do). Hopefully by living out, I can actually concentrate on revising for the first time in my life. This way, I should easily manage to get a first degree (70%+).

    Q. 18) How do you think the foundation course can be improved?
    A. 18)
    - Lower tuition prices. I honestly don't see why they need that much money.
    - If somebody fails to get into University straight away, allow them to do 'entry' exams, to see if they really need to attend a foundation course or not.
    They can put the study material on their website. They can set a specific date for when the 'entry exams' will take place (probably should be set in late August).
    If something like that existed, I'm pretty sure I would have passed without needing to do the foundation course. However I doubt they'll do that, because they're greedy for money, rather than to judge whether somebody is intellectually competent enough to cope with University or not.
    - Generally, food prices are too expensive. Example: Sandwich prices shouldn't cost more than £1. The local shops at Kingston literally sell it for £1. So why can't the College & University?
    You'd think they'd get better deals than a local shop... Food prices are cheaper at the College though, but not by much.



    TL;DR =
    If you failed AS/A-Levels, this course is probably the easiest route into a Science course at University. The minute you get your AS results and if you didn't get C or above in most subjects, I'd recommend you apply for this course straight away. Don't bother doing A2/completing A levels- you'll probably end up wasting time & it (AS/A2) requires far more effort (plus you'll avoid retakes).
    Heck, even if you have only done GCSE with B's and above (in Science and Maths), you should find this course relatively easy as long as you attend nearly all of the lectures (~95%).
    I didn't even have enough UCAS points to meet this course's minimum requirement, as I only did AS (I got 3 E's). I only revised the night before an exam for all of the foundation module exams, yet I still passed this course easily.

    If you know anybody who has failed A-Levels and failed to get into a Science course via UCAS clearing. Then I'd highly recommend you tell them about this course, which is almost a guaranteed route into a Science course at University.
    I wish more schools told students about foundation courses. They make it seem like you can never get into University if you fail A-Levels.




    Module Guides - Click here to download!

    Revision: Kingston Science Foundation Year - Click here to download!
    (mostly past papers)

    You don't just have to take my word for it that this course is easy.
    Have a look yourself by downloading the module guides & revision material.
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    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    I studied the Science foundation year course at Kingston College during 2014/2015.

    I'll just do this post in a Q & A format, since it will probably be more useful for those who have questions about the course.
    Note: This is an unofficial Q & A post based on my personal experience.



    Q.1) I applied for the Science Foundation Year, where is it?
    A.1) You should be told by email and/or through UCAS where it will be taught. Most will get taught it at Kingston College.
    However, it's possible you may be taught it exclusively at Kingston University (Penrhyn road campus).
    My friends who were taught it at the University complained that they weren't as organised as the College and that the teachers followed instructions set by the college teachers, as it was the college teachers who decided what would appear in the exams and whatnot.

    Q. 2) As a UK student, how much will it cost me? Will Student Finance cover the cost?
    A.1) As of 2016, it costs £6,000. When I did it in 2014/2015, it cost around £4000.
    If you're eligible for student finance, then yes, they should cover the foundation year along with all subsequent years (when you actually enter University with your desired course).

    Q. 3) I picked a specific science course (e.g: Chemistry), can I change my mind to another Science course (e.g: Biomedical science) later on?
    A. 3) Yes you can. As long as it isn't Pharmacy, you should be able to change to any of the other University Science courses if you get above 40% in all the foundation modules.
    If you want to get into Pharmacy, you will need 70%+ overall and (possibly) 60%+ in both the chemistry and biology modules.
    If you don't, you can still ask the staff whether you're still eligible or not. If the University is feeling lenient/they have space, they might let you through even if you don't meet the requirement.
    Q. 4) Can I apply to other Universities based on the Science foundation year course?A. 4) Yes you can. You should apply to other courses the moment you've enrolled into this science foundation course. You'll most likely be interviewed. Assuming you pass the interview, the other Universities (like Hertfordshire) may expect a higher passing percentage on average though. So instead of 40% which Kingston requires, they may expect an average of 50%. They may require you to have some A-Level grades too.If you stick with Kingston University, you'll not be interviewed (unless you want to go into Pharmacy) and everything afterwards is done internally. So you don't ever need to use UCAS again, after being enrolled into the Science foundation year course.

    Q. 5) Can I retake if I fail the year?
    A. 5) Depends on how many modules you fail. If you fail 1 or 2, during the summer holidays, you'll be informed that you can re-take the entire module(s) (new retake exam & new retake courseworks).
    It's the same standard at the University.

    Q. 6) Do you believe this course is easier than A-Level science courses?
    A. 6) Most definitely! Just to put things into perspective, if you can get E at A-levels in Maths/Science subjects, you're most likely going to easily pass this course. Heck, if you can get D at AS Maths/Science subjects, you'll still find this course easy.
    I know, because I ended up getting that for A-Level. I didn't even meet the minimum 160 UCAS points required to apply for this course.

    Q. 7) How much did you revise before the exams?
    A. 7) The night before the exams, for all of them. In GCSE, I mainly got all A's and B's while only studying the night before an exam. If you're like me, then you shouldn't have anything to worry about.
    I didn't revise anything at home, or at college outside of lectures/classes.

    Q. 8) How many lectures/classes did you attend?
    A. 8) My attendance was ~95%. Attendance is recorded. If your attendance drops too low (below 50%), you might be kicked from the course and/or not be allowed re-takes, if you end up failing any modules.
    I was probably one of the very few students who attended nearly every single lecture.
    Think of it this way. If you can average 95% attendance, you're guaranteed to pass all the modules (I had 4 modules in total).
    However, make sure you do well in the coursework (~70%). This will significantly reduce your stress, as you won't have to worry as much for the final exams.

    Q. 9) Which course was the hardest? Why?
    A. 9) Without a doubt, it was Biology. The lectures are extremely boring, especially late in the afternoon and they cover so much material. They try to cram AS and A2 Biology into a single year.
    What makes this a joke is that the final exam is so simple. So ~90% of the stuff you're taught will not appear in the exam. Do not feel bad if you go into the lecture, and you don't remember a single thing that was said.
    Chemistry was the second most difficult. It mostly consists of AS chemistry, with very few parts being from A2 chemistry. Basically, most of the easier parts from A-Level Chemistry, so don't worry if you failed A-Level Chemistry.

    Q. 10) Which course was the easiest? Why?
    A. 10) Maths. I got A in GCSE Maths. The Maths in this course literally starts from primary school level and then works it way up to AS Maths (near the end). If you know the basics, you'll find this course almost a joke. I got my 14 year old cousin (who got level 4 in KS2 Maths) to do the final exam (past paper), and he managed to pass with ~50% (I was supervising over him, to prevent him from cheating). That pretty much says it all. I had already passed the course without needing to do the final exam (I had 45% out of 50% before the final exam).

    Q. 11) Could you use University facilities as well as the College facilities?
    A. 11) Yes I could. There are a 'help' lessons, which specifically help you integrate with the University. You basically have access to the University, just like anyone else who is studying at the University. The staff will constantly mention this, just so you feel like a University student. So don't feel pessimistic if you do end up studying at the college, because you still are a University student. Don't let anybody else tell you otherwise.

    Q. 12) What did you generally think of the lectures?
    A. 12) Most of them are decent. However, I had this one teacher, who was new to the job (teaching biology). She was pretty incompetent. If you want help, make sure to email them. They should reply back to you pretty fast (within 48 hours). Don't expect much from them though, it's not like 6th Form at A-Levels. They don't care too much whether you pass or not. If you don't pay attention, you're losing out, not them.

    Q. 13) What is the best way to revise?
    A. 13) During my time, they used a system called 'Moodle' to keep us updated. The chemistry teacher made sure to keep things up to date. Whereas the other subjects were not very organised. You'll also submit courseworks on 'Moodle'. When I revised one day before an exam, I just read up on the powerpoints posted on Moodle by the lecturers. It was extremely useful to quickly read up on the topics I was unsure about.
    I wouldn't recommend buying any books. Just borrow from the library (either the College or University). If you can't get it, don't bother unless you want to get into Pharmacy.

    Q. 14) Is the foundation course similar to your University course?
    A. 14) Based on personal experience, yes it is. I'm currently doing 'Pharmaceutical Science'. The foundation course definitely has a lot of traits which are similar to my course.
    The difficulty is similar too. If you do well in the foundation year, you'll probably do just as well (if not better) during University (first year). I can only speak for my course though, I'm not sure about the other courses that have more biology.

    Q. 15) What results did you get during the foundation year?
    A. 15) Maths: ~75%. Skills: ~75%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~45%.

    Q. 16) What results did you get during your first year at University (Pharmaceutical Science)?
    A. 16) Molecular Skills: ~80%. Spectroscopy: ~80%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~65%.

    Q. 17) Overall experience?
    A. 17) If you're a mature student and/or somebody who has been out of education for quite some time (3+ years), this course will definitely help you refresh and it's worth it.
    I wasn't a mature student though. I came directly after not getting the required A-Level grades. I must say, this course is a much easier route into University then A-Levels.
    I'd say the foundation year difficulty wise, is the same as doing Science and Math at GCSE (while achieving B in GCSE at minimum).
    You can fail the final exams, yet still pass due to good coursework marks, which makes this course an extremely easy route to get into University. Honestly, I don't think a single student who manages to attend 90%+ lectures should fail any modules. The hardest challenge is attending all the lectures. Commuting took me roughly 2 hours (2 trains and 2 buses).
    As my UCAS points was below 160, there was no way I was going to get into any University to do my desired course. So I'm extremely thankful that this course exists for lazy people like me, who struggle to revise due to procrastination and other personal reasons.
    I've applied to live out for my 2nd year (3rd year, if you count foundation year) at University (1st year doesn't count, 2nd and 3rd year do). Hopefully by living out, I can actually concentrate on revising for the first time in my life. This way, I should easily manage to get a first degree (70%+).

    Q. 18) How do you think the foundation course can be improved?
    A. 18)
    - Lower tuition prices. I honestly don't see why they need that much money.
    - If somebody fails to get into University straight away, allow them to do 'entry' exams, to see if they really need to attend a foundation course or not.
    They can put the study material on their website. They can set a specific date for when the 'entry exams' will take place (probably should be set in late August).
    If something like that existed, I'm pretty sure I would have passed without needing to do the foundation course. However I doubt they'll do that, because they're greedy for money, rather than to judge whether somebody is intellectually competent enough to cope with University or not.
    - Generally, food prices are too expensive. Example: Sandwich prices shouldn't cost more than £1. The local shops at Kingston literally sell it for £1. So why can't the College & University?
    You'd think they'd get better deals than a local shop... Food prices are cheaper at the College though, but not by much.



    TL;DR =
    If you failed A-Levels (didn't get C or above), this course is probably the easiest route into a Science course at University.
    Heck, even if you have only done GCSE with B's and above (in Science and Maths), you should find this course relatively easy as long as you attend nearly all of the lectures (~95%).
    I didn't even have enough UCAS points to meet this course's minimum requirement, as I only did AS (I got 3 E's). I only revised the night before an exam for all of them, yet I still passed this course easily.

    If you know anybody who has failed A-Levels and failed to get into a Science course via UCAS clearing. Then I'd highly recommend you tell them about this course, which is almost a guaranteed route into a Science course at University.
    I wish more schools told students about foundation courses. They make it seem like you can never get into University if you fail A-Levels.
    Hi,

    I would really appreciate it if you could answer the following questions

    1. Which subjects did you study at A-Level?
    2. Did you do A2 originally or just did AS and applied to university?
    3. How many students are there per lecture?
    4. Did you apply through clearing? If so, is it hard to go through clearing?
    5. Do they generally accept students with lower than UCAS entry criteria?
    6. Is there any A2 Maths (similar to Edexcel C3,C4,S2) or just AS?
    7. How long are the exams?
    8. What does the coursework consist of?
    9. What percentage of coursework counts towards final grade?
    10. Do you have any sample past paper questions available for Biology, Chemistry, Maths?
    11. Is there anything a student can do to prepare over the summer for this course?
    12. Are students who are applying for Pharmacy, Biomedical Science, Chemistry will all be in the same Foundation year class? Or, different classes?
    13. What is skills?


    Thanks
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    (Original post by LionKing101)
    1. Which subjects did you study at A-Level?
    2. Did you do A2 originally or just did AS and applied to university?
    I did AS for 2 years (retook the year- I pretty much got the sames grades during my retake year), followed by a gap year (A-Levels was the worst time of my life, for several different reasons). My school didn't allow me to do A2, as my grades were too low.
    My AS Results:
    AS Maths: E
    AS Biology: E
    AS Chemistry: E
    AS Physics: U (I didn't retake Physics)
    EPQ: C

    My attendance in AS was around 70%. I only studied the night before every single exam. I didn't study outside of class at all.
    I basically put in the same effort as I did in GCSE for AS, whilst also having a much lower attendance. My GCSE attendance was around 95%.

    My GCSE grades are:
    3 A's
    8 B's.
    1 C.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    3. How many students are there per lecture?
    It depends on a variety of different things such as: The module, how big the classroom is, semester 1 or 2, time of day, and your timetable.
    Example 1: if you have a lecture at 9am, fewer students will show up than normal.
    Example 2: If there is only 1 lecture for the entire day, then students who have to commute will probably not show up. I tried to attend every single lecture, no matter what.
    Semester 1 = Before Christmas Holidays.
    Semester 2 = After Christmas Holidays.

    I'll go over all the modules below, giving you a rough idea how many students show up on average.
    Biology/Chemistry Lectures: The room can handle up to 60 people.
    Semester 1: Attendance is around 50.
    Semester 2: Attendance is around 40.

    Biology/Chemistry workshop (lab room): A normal sized lab room. So it can only handle up to 30 people.
    Semester 1: Attendance is around 25.
    Semester 2: Attendance is around 20.
    Note: For the workshop, more students will show up for Chemistry than Biology. However, more students will show up for the Biology lectures than Chemistry lectures.

    Maths: A normal sized classroom. So it can only handle up to 30 people.
    Semester 1: Attendance is around 15.
    Semester 2: Attendance is around 10.
    Maths has the least number of students show up for it, because the course is extremely easy (starting from primary school).

    Skills workshop: A normal sized classroom. So it can only handle up to 30 people.
    Semester 1: Attendance is around 25.
    Semester 2: Attendance is around 20.

    Skills lectures: The room can handle up to 60 people.
    Semester 1: Attendance is around 40.
    Semester 2: Attendance is around 30.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    4. Did you apply through clearing? If so, is it hard to go through clearing?
    Yes I applied through clearing, after a Gap year.
    I only had 120 UCAS points.
    I wasn't even registered for UCAS that year. I registered for UCAS after clearing began. I then rang Kingston University's clearing number and I told them my grades and that I wanted to do the Science foundation year course to apply for Biochemistry (I changed my mind to Pharmaceutical science midway through the foundation year). It was an extremely quick and easy process.
    If I had better grades, I would have applied into Pharmacy. But I honestly never even considered doing it, as I lost all hope during A-Levels. Turns out it really isn't difficult getting into Pharmacy via the Science foundation year route.
    The staff told me that they've even accepted students with just GCSE and/or those who barely have any qualifications and are mature students.
    So pretty much anybody can get through if they have the space. If people end up failing, they'll still make money regardless. If you pass however, your spot is guaranteed into the University.
    Some people even came into the course 1 month late.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    5. Do they generally accept students with lower than UCAS entry criteria?
    No idea. You'll have to ask them to release statistics on this.
    Most of the people I talked to in the course did meet the UCAS criteria though. Many weren't bothered showing up to lectures and most of them seemed pretty clueless- I only realised how truly dumb people are after enrolling in this course.

    A-levels forces students to revise on a regular basis and throughout the year (tests long term memory). My exam board was AQA for all my subjects. We had absolutely no coursework. Everything was exam based.

    Those who do last minute revision (rely on short term memory) will most likely not to do well at A-Levels (like me). Therefore will be discouraged/ won't think they can handle University.
    To do well in the foundation course and Kingston University (at least, during the first year), short term memory is all that is needed. Last minute revision actually works. However, obviously if you want to get into Pharmacy, you shouldn't rely on just short term memory.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    6. Is there any A2 Maths (similar to Edexcel C3,C4,S2) or just AS?
    I only did AS Maths (AQA). I don't remember there being anything I didn't already know.
    So no, I don't think there was any A2.
    In the in-class Maths exam (25% overall), I got 88% - the second highest in my class. In the coursework (statistics- 25% overall) I got 91%. I was surprised by how many people didn't know basic arithmetic and statistics. In all of the practice tests, I consistency got ~95% without revising a single thing at home.
    Even some people who supposedly got A in GCSE Maths like I did, seemed pretty clueless how to do GCSE/KS3 Maths.

    AS Maths material they covered (what I remember doing) = Logarithm, exponential functions, differentiation and integration (the absolute basics- which was done near the end of the course).
    Aside from that, it's mostly just KS3 and GCSE Maths.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    7. How long are the exams?
    End of year exams = 2 hours.
    In class tests = Most were 1 hour. Aside from the lab examination, that was 2 hours (experiment + exam paper).

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    8. What does the coursework consist of?
    Most were just lab reports.
    Lab report consists of: Title, aims, methodology, results obtained, data/result analysis, discussion and conclusion.

    There was an extremely long Chemistry coursework though (25%), with a bunch of questions (AS and A2 questions- 50+ questions). There was also this Biology coursework on genetics (~10 questions).

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    9. What percentage of coursework counts towards final grade?
    For most modules, it was 50% 50% or 60% (exam) 40% (coursework).
    You had to do more than 1 coursework per module though. Biology and Chemistry you also had in-class tests which count towards your coursework percentage.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    10. Do you have any sample past paper questions available for Biology, Chemistry, Maths?
    I don't think I do now. They'll provide you with relevant sample papers (before exams), so you'll be fine. The sample papers are very similar to the actual exam.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    11. Is there anything a student can do to prepare over the summer for this course?
    Revise AS and A2 Biology & AS Chemistry. Any A-Level book will do.
    If you want, I could sell you my 'advanced biology' textbook. That's the only Biology book they'll recommend for you to buy. These are usually not available in the library. If they are, they'll probably ask you for to return it within 7 days or face a fine. I know this, because I tried to keep renewing it lol. The chemistry one wasn't in demand, so I kept renewing that.
    If you plan on going to Pharmacy, then I'd recommend you buy it. Otherwise there is no point.

    The main reason why I did so much better in the foundation year and University 1st year in-comparison to AS is because:
    - There is coursework. Also, they usually count as 50% towards your final grade - I generally am good at doing coursework.
    - The exams are much easier. By this I mean there is less material to study from, multiple choice questions, no questions that required external knowledge outside of what was taught.
    - The exams are pretty similar to sample/past papers.
    - The lecturer knows how the exam will be, so will help you focus on the important parts in the workshops and in lectures.
    - You also get assessed in practicals.

    I didn't put in any more effort (aside from higher attendance), yet I got so much better. Hence I assume this means A-Levels in contrast to University 1st year & Foundation courses (probably most Universities) do not require the same standards in order to do well.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    12. Are students who are applying for Pharmacy, Biomedical Science, Chemistry will all be in the same Foundation year class? Or, different classes?
    Same class. They'll just mix you in.
    There are so many Science courses Kingston offers. Like nutrition, forensic science, biochemistry, biomedical science, chemistry, biology etc... Check out their website, to know all the different science courses available. This Science foundation year is a gateway to pretty much all of them. You'll know all the specific Science courses on the day you get your student ID. As you'll have to collect a sheet with your induction week timetable. They mention all the Science courses in it.

    (Original post by LionKing101)
    13. What is skills?
    GCSE and AS Physics.
    Also just general skills. Like how to borrow a library book, use email, avoid plagiarism, take notes etc...

    In Pharmaceutical Science at the University, it's pretty much the same thing except Physics is replaced with Maths and ICT (how to use excel).

    Science foundation year: Entry requirements
    "Please note: We will consider you as overqualified for the foundation route into Pharmacy if you have two or more science A2s. In such cases, we will either make you an offer on an alternative course or mark your application as unsuccessful."
    Don't lose hope if you can't apply to this foundation course. This probably means they'll give you an alternative, better offer.
    Please look at my post over here for more details:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post66208059
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    Just completed SDF course this year (2015/16) and everything you mentioned in the main post is still very true. Just got my results the other day and I'm happy to say that I got into first year of Pharmaceutical Science just like you. Just wondering (and not really related to the topic) how did you find the first year of Pharmaceutical Science? Are the classes similar if not, better than the college?
    Thanks,
    Mo
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    (Original post by MoMo8)
    Just wondering (and not really related to the topic) how did you find the first year of Pharmaceutical Science? Are the classes similar if not, better than the college?
    I'd say it's better/easier at the University than College for our course.
    If you're somebody like me, you'll enjoy it more too. As there is more problem solving and much more lab work. Furthermore, as I don't revise much, I'll obviously do better in courses where there isn't as much to memorise.
    College still felt like doing AS/GCSE, whereas the University (our course) takes a more practical approach. So I'd say it's definitely a new experience, but not by much (at least, not the first year).
    However, the lectures are still pretty much taught the same way - you get a handout and they read off a power point presentation.
    I found University lecturers to be more organised. For instance, all the power points & workshop material is immediately put on 'study space' after the lesson.

    Going into more detail about each module in Pharmaceutical Science:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    - There are practicals in all modules except molecular skills. Hence you'll be doing far more lab work and you'll notice many of them are being assessed (the quality of product is tested).
    You will have to work with a partner though (the product being assessed, you'll both receive the same mark).
    Important note: Don't leave the filter paper in the sample bag. If you do, you'll lose marks.

    - Each module in the final exam has multiple choice questions in it (~20), as well as Long Answer Questions (~4 sections).

    - Workshop lessons pretty much go over past paper questions (non-multiple choice questions).

    - Near the end of the year, some of the teachers will go through 'multiple choice' past paper questions (most multiple choice questions are removed online from the past papers).
    This is extremely helpful. Hence make sure to attend workshop and lectures, especially near the end of each semester. Although it's probably best to not miss anything.

    - Spectroscopy:
    Most of it is lab based. If you do good lab work (most people get ~90%) and you do well in the coursework (~70%), you've pretty much passed this course even if you get 0% in the final exam. The final exam is not difficult. Past papers are your ally here, as they repeat a lot of questions. Finally, if you can do all the workshop questions correctly and understand it, you'll probably get 80%+ in the course like I did.

    - Biology:
    Modules are decent/easy to remember. Make sure to actually study in semester 1 though, because there will be two mid-module tests (MMTs) together (so right before the Christmas holidays). The Biology 'MMTs' are both multiple choice (20 & 30 multiple choice questions). So it's important to do well in this, to ease stress for the final exam, if nothing else.
    For the MMTs I got ~60% and that was by only revising 2 hours before the exam. However, I did pay attention in most of the lectures.
    Dr Snabaitis: He covers a lot of material, hence I found it quite difficult remembering all of his parts. I'd recommend you revise all of the 'diagrams' and all of his workshops. Thankfully, most of what he taught didn't appear in the exams. What all the other Biology teachers teach is manageable.
    The final exam for Biology is worth 60%. Mid-Module Tests are 30% (10%+20%). Urine Analysis Multiple Choice questions (done online) is worth 10%. So you can't slack off in this module.

    - Molecular skills:
    Mostly Maths, Statistics, and general skills (plagiarism, note taking etc). Extremely easy module. Most of the molecular skills module (~80%) is just answering multiple choice questions (the final exam is just 60 multiple choice questions). Coursework in this module (including in-class tests) is 70% of the module. Final exam is 30%.
    So you should pass this module before the final exam, if you attend all lectures and workshops (I had ~55% before the final exam).

    - Foundation Chemistry:
    Semester 1- Dr Sinclar: He covers way too much material. If you can remember most of what you did in AS and A2 chemistry (mechanics and naming), you'll be fine though. I personally forgot most of it, so I found it difficult.
    Semester 2- Dr Mann: I found his part the most difficult. Basically you're learning new mechanics and there is so many things to remember. In the final exam, for Dr Mann's part, I'm pretty sure I got 0/20 because this year they decided to change his section of the paper to something that wasn't in any of the recent past papers ¬_¬.
    Chapman and Kresenski's part I found fairly straightforward. But there is a lot Chapman covers (thankfully, it was lots of AS chemistry parts that I already knew).Do well in the lab experiment (15%) and summative lab report (15%) and assignment (20%), and you'll pretty much pass this course without having to do well in the final exam (as you should already have 30%-40% before final exam).


    If you want to know more about Pharmaceutical Science, please private message me.
    As I probably won't be taking about Pharmaceutical Science, in this thread, any further.
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    (Original post by MoMo8)
    Just completed SDF course this year (2015/16) and everything you mentioned in the main post is still very true. Just got my results the other day and I'm happy to say that I got into first year of Pharmaceutical Science just like you. Just wondering (and not really related to the topic) how did you find the first year of Pharmaceutical Science? Are the classes similar if not, better than the college?
    Thanks,
    Mo
    Hi,

    I just wanted to ask, how did you find the Science Foundation Year this year?
    Do you have any copy of any notes/revision books/syllabus/ or anything really?

    Thanks,

    Also, congratulations on your results and getting into Pharmaceutical Science.

    Regards
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    (Original post by LionKing101)
    Hi,

    I just wanted to ask, how did you find the Science Foundation Year this year?
    Do you have any copy of any notes/revision books/syllabus/ or anything really?


    Thanks,

    Also, congratulations on your results and getting into Pharmaceutical Science.

    Regards
    If you put your mind to it and don't get distracted the year should be a breeze for you.
    Also, in terms of revision/notes I recommend the CGP books that you use for A Levels and if you haven't done A levels then you should still buy the books (only for Biology and Chemistry btw) as the books the tell you to get are quite expensive and have way too much info for my liking; for instance for the Biology module the tell you get the 'Advanced Biology' by Micheal Kent for use throughout the whole year and the Course/Module Leader Phil will refer to it throughout the whole year but as I said way to much info and cost £50 (bear in mind I haven't used it much too)

    And in terms of the syllabus and stuff I still have it lying around somewhere as I though I'd be resitting some of the modules so if you need it just PM me.

    And finally thanks, looking forward to hopefully seeing you around next year!
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    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    I'd say it's better/easier at the University than College for our course.
    If you're somebody like me, you'll enjoy it more too. As there is more problem solving and much more lab work. Furthermore, as I don't revise much, I'll obviously do better in courses where there isn't as much to memorise.
    College still felt like doing AS/GCSE, whereas the University (our course) takes a more practical approach. So I'd say it's definitely a new experience, but not by much (at least, not the first year).
    However, the lectures are still pretty much taught the same way - you get a handout and they read off a power point presentation.
    I found University lecturers to be more organised. For instance, all the power points & workshop material is immediately put on 'study space' after the lesson.

    Going into more detail about each module in Pharmaceutical Science:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    - There are practicals in all modules except molecular skills. Hence you'll be doing far more lab work and you'll notice many of them are being assessed (the quality of product is tested).
    You will have to work with a partner though (the product being assessed, you'll both receive the same mark).
    Important note: Don't leave the filter paper in the sample bag. If you do, you'll lose marks.

    - Each module in the final exam has multiple choice questions in it (~20), as well as Long Answer Questions (~4 sections).

    - Workshop lessons pretty much go over past paper questions (non-multiple choice questions).

    - Near the end of the year, some of the teachers will go through 'multiple choice' past paper questions (most multiple choice questions are removed online from the past papers).
    This is extremely helpful. Hence make sure to attend workshop and lectures, especially near the end of each semester. Although it's probably best to not miss anything.

    - Spectroscopy:
    Most of it is lab based. If you good good lab work (most people get ~90%) and you do well in the coursework (~70%), you've pretty much passed this course even if you get 0% in the final exam. The final exam is not difficult. Past papers are your ally here, as they repeat a lot of questions. Finally, if you can do all the workshop questions, you'll probably get 80%+ in the course like I did.

    - Biology:
    Modules are decent/easy to remember. Make sure to actually study in semester 1 though, because there will be two mid-module tests (MMTs) together (so right before the Christmas holidays). The Biology 'MMTs' are both multiple choice (20 & 30 multiple choice questions). So it's important to do well in this, to ease stress for the final exam, if nothing else.
    For the MMTs I got ~60% and that was by only revising 2 hours before the exam. However, I did pay attention in most of the lectures.
    Dr Snabaitis: He covers a lot of material, hence I found it quite difficult remembering all of his parts. I'd recommend you revise all of the 'diagrams' and all of his workshops. Thankfully, most of what he taught didn't appear in the exams. What all the other Biology teachers teach is manageable.
    The final exam for Biology is worth 60%. Mid-Module Tests are 30% (10%+20%). Urine Analysis Multiple Choice questions (done online) is worth 10%. So you can't slack off in this module.

    - Molecular skills:
    Mostly Maths, Statistics, and general skills (plagiarism, note taking etc). Extremely easy module. Most of the molecular skills module (~80%) is just answering multiple choice questions (the final exam is just 60 multiple choice questions). Coursework in this module (including in-class tests) is 70% of the module. Final exam is 30%.
    So you should pass this module before the final exam, if you attend all lectures and workshops (I had ~55% before the final exam).

    - Foundation Chemistry:
    Semester 1- Dr Sinclar: He covers way too much material. If you can remember most of what you did in AS and A2 chemistry (mechanics and naming), you'll be fine though. I personally forgot most of it, so I found it difficult.
    Semester 2- Dr Mann: I found his part the most difficult. Basically you're learning new mechanics and there is so many things to remember. In the final exam, for Dr Mann's part, I'm pretty sure I got 0/20 because this year they decided to change his section of the paper to something that wasn't in any of the recent past papers ¬_¬.
    Chapman and Kresenski's part I found fairly straightforward. But there is a lot Chapman covers (thankfully, it was lots of AS chemistry parts that I already knew).Do well in the lab experiment (15%) and summative lab report (15%) and assignment (20%), and you'll pretty much pass this course without having to do well in the final exam (as you should already have 30%-40% before final exam).


    If you want to know more about Pharmaceutical Science, please private message me.
    As I probably won't be taking about Pharmaceutical Science, in this thread, any further.
    I can't thank you enough mate for all the info for the first year. Starting to feel very confident for next year now. Bring it on!

    Once again thanks and if I need anything again I'll be sure to PM you mate.

    Regards
    Mo
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    (Original post by MoMo8)
    If you put your mind to it and don't get distracted the year should be a breeze for you.
    Also, in terms of revision/notes I recommend the CGP books that you use for A Levels and if you haven't done A levels then you should still buy the books (only for Biology and Chemistry btw) as the books the tell you to get are quite expensive and have way too much info for my liking; for instance for the Biology module the tell you get the 'Advanced Biology' by Micheal Kent for use throughout the whole year and the Course/Module Leader Phil will refer to it throughout the whole year but as I said way to much info and cost £50 (bear in mind I haven't used it much too)

    And in terms of the syllabus and stuff I still have it lying around somewhere as I though I'd be resitting some of the modules so if you need it just PM me.

    And finally thanks, looking forward to hopefully seeing you around next year!
    Thanks, I do appreciate it.

    Do you have to buy a wide range of books for Biology and Chemistry or do you just have to learn the information they teach in the lectures?

    How were the exams this year?
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    (Original post by LionKing101)
    Thanks, I do appreciate it.

    Do you have to buy a wide range of books for Biology and Chemistry or do you just have to learn the information they teach in the lectures?

    How were the exams this year?
    They give you handouts before the lecture but they're mainly based or are indeed the PowerPoint they put up. You have to learn what they teach you as they will come up in assignments they give you as well as the lab reports they ask you to do and of course what comes up in the exam throughout the year.

    During this years exam, Biology was the first and has the most content of all 4 modules. We were told certain things would come up and they certainly did not as the 30 multiple-choice questions (Section A) was based on evolution (a topic which we haven't gone in depth I felt). But the second part of the exam (Section B) was okay.

    Chemistry, if you revised well enough which I did fortunately should be easy. As I did well in the Practicals and 'Theory Assignment' I didn't need much in the exam to pass (40%).

    Maths for Science, again I already passed the module well before the exam and the Assignment as well as the time-constrained test are worth 25% each. If you good at Maths it should be easy, it's not even A level Maths till the end of the year when it finally hits differentiation and intergration.

    Skills, oh skills. Well there's not much to say for skills as its easy but at the same time hard. What they ask you to do is easy but are strict when it comes to the answers. The exam is basically simple physics, well not simple if you haven't done it before but still manageable.

    Any more queries?

    Regards
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    (Original post by MoMo8)
    ...
    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    ... .
    Hi,

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Bi...y+michael+kent

    Is this the book you guys were talking about? Will you be tested on this whole textbook for Biology?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by LionKing101)
    Hi,

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Advanced-Bi...y+michael+kent

    Is this the book you guys were talking about? Will you be tested on this whole textbook for Biology?

    Thanks
    Yes that is the book.
    I've still got a copy I can sell to you.

    You will not be tested on the whole book. Just a few topics.

    I don't currently have the module guide. If I did, I could have uploaded it so you can see which topics.
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    Module Guide and Revision Material has been added into my first post (at the bottom).

    I will remain active on this website for roughly 2 more months (before University starts).
    Feel free to ask me questions until then.
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    Hi,

    When did you get your timetable? I'm getting anxious now haha
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    (Original post by bkingkingking)
    Hi,

    When did you get your timetable? I'm getting anxious now haha
    If I remember correctly, it was during freshers week.
    So you should get it around 19th September (that's when freshers week starts).

    The timetable will be available on 'moodle' too.
    They should tell you during freshers week about 'moodle' and how you can access it (username and password).
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    (Original post by bkingkingking)
    Hi,

    When did you get your timetable? I'm getting anxious now haha
    Just adding to what Alchemist said, you can find your induction/welcome week timetables through this link

    http://www.kingston.ac.uk/welcome-we...on-timetables/

    Just find the course you'll be studying after your foundation year but click on the ones that's say 'with Foundation Year' on it (e.g
    If I was to be studying Pharmaceutical Science after my foundation year I'll find the one that says 'Pharmaceutical Science with Foundation Year BSc Hons (Full Time)').
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    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    If I remember correctly, it was during freshers week.
    So you should get it around 19th September (that's when freshers week starts).

    The timetable will be available on 'moodle' too.
    They should tell you during freshers week about 'moodle' and how you can access it (username and password).

    (Original post by MoMo8)
    Just adding to what Alchemist said, you can find your induction/welcome week timetables through this link

    http://www.kingston.ac.uk/welcome-we...on-timetables/

    Just find the course you'll be studying after your foundation year but click on the ones that's say 'with Foundation Year' on it (e.g
    If I was to be studying Pharmaceutical Science after my foundation year I'll find the one that says 'Pharmaceutical Science with Foundation Year BSc Hons (Full Time)'.

    Great, Thank you!
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    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    I studied the Science foundation year course at Kingston College during 2014/2015.

    I'll just do this post in a Q & A format, since it will probably be more useful for those who have questions about the course.
    Note: This is an unofficial Q & A post based on my personal experience.



    Q.1) I applied for the Science Foundation Year, where is it?
    A.1) You should be told by email and/or through UCAS where it will be taught. Most will get taught it at Kingston College.
    However, it's possible you may be taught it exclusively at Kingston University (Penrhyn road campus).
    My friends who were taught it at the University complained that they weren't as organised as the College and that the teachers followed instructions set by the college teachers, as it was the college teachers who decided what would appear in the exams and whatnot.

    Q. 2) As a UK student, how much will it cost me? Will Student Finance cover the cost?
    A.1) As of 2016, it costs £6,000. When I did it in 2014/2015, it cost £4600.
    If you're eligible for student finance, then yes, they should cover the foundation year along with all subsequent years (when you actually enter University with your desired course).

    Q. 3) I picked a specific science course (e.g: Chemistry), can I change my mind to another Science course (e.g: Biomedical science) later on?
    A. 3) Yes you can. You should be able to transfer onto another Kingston University Science course if you pass the Science foundation year course (40%+ in all modules).
    However, If you want to get into Pharmacy, you will need 70%+ overall and (possibly) 60%+ in Chemistry & Biology.
    If you don't, you can still ask the staff whether you're still eligible or not. If the University is feeling lenient/they have space, they might let you through even if you don't meet the requirements.

    Q. 4) Can I apply to other Universities based on the Science foundation year course?
    A. 4) Yes you can. You should apply to other courses the moment you've enrolled into this Science foundation course. You'll most likely be interviewed. Assuming you pass the interview, the other Universities (like Hertfordshire) may expect a higher passing percentage on average though. So instead of 40% which Kingston requires, they may expect an average of 50%. They may require you to have some A-Level grades too.If you stick with Kingston University, you'll not be interviewed (unless you want to go into Pharmacy) and everything afterwards is done internally. So you don't ever need to use UCAS again, after being enrolled into the Science foundation year course.

    Q. 5) Can I retake if I fail the year?
    A. 5) Depends on how many modules you fail. If you've failed any modules, speak to your course leader and/or your personal tutor immediately after receiving your results.
    From what I've seen though, if you fail 1 or 2, shortly after the results are released, you'll be informed (on Moodle) that you can re-take the entire module(s) (new retake exam & new retake courseworks). They have a similar standard at the University, although instead of 'Moodle' everything is done on 'Studyspace'.

    Q. 6) Do you believe this course is easier than A-Level science courses?
    A. 6) Most definitely! Just to put things into perspective, if you can get E at A-levels in Maths/Science subjects, you're most likely going to easily pass this course. Heck, if you can get D at AS Maths/Science subjects, you'll still find this course relatively easy. However that's not to say you should lack off. Make sure to attend as many lectures as possible. There is no point increasing your chances of failing just because you're too lazy to show up to the lectures (no matter how easy you may think they are). All the students I know that got into Pharmacy, were the people who showed up to as many lectures as possible.

    Q. 7) How much did you revise before the exams?
    A. 7) The night before the exams, for all of them. I didn't revise anything at home, or at University/College outside of lectures/classes.
    I put in the same effort for GCSE's too. So I mainly got all A's and B's while only studying the night before an exam.

    If I had known the exams were this easy in the Science foundation course & University, I may have put in more effort to get into Pharmacy. I think even revising a little can make a huge difference. As the revision material is actually relevant to what appears in the exams- I never felt this way at all during A-levels. Additionally, I've only recently realised that University isn't much more difficult than Science foundation year.

    Q. 8) How many lectures/classes did you attend?
    A. 8) My attendance was ~95%. Attendance is recorded. If your attendance drops too low (below 50%), you might be kicked from the course and/or not be allowed re-takes, if you end up failing any modules. I was probably one of the very few students who attended nearly every single lecture.
    Think of it this way. If you can average 95% attendance, you're guaranteed to pass all the modules (I had 4 modules in total).
    Furthermore, make sure you do well in all courseworks. Ask your fellow peers for help. However, don't just email your work to them. Make sure you both do the work yourselves and then in person, show your work to each other (print it out). This should prevent plagiarism from both parties, at the same time you both can learn from each other and improve your own coursework.
    Getting good marks in the coursework will significantly reduce your stress, as you won't have to worry as much for the final exams.

    Q. 9) Which course was the hardest? Why?
    A. 9) Without a doubt, it was Biology. The lectures are extremely boring, especially late in the afternoon and they cover so much material. They try to cram AS and A2 Biology into a single year.
    What makes this a joke is that the final exam is so simple. So ~90% of the stuff you're taught will not appear in the exam. Do not feel bad if you go into the lecture, and you don't remember a single thing that was said.
    Chemistry was the second most difficult. It mostly consists of AS chemistry, with a couple of parts coming from A2 chemistry. Basically, most of the easier parts from A-Level Chemistry, so don't worry if you failed A-Level Chemistry.

    Q. 10) Which course was the easiest? Why?
    A. 10) Maths. I got A in GCSE Maths. The Maths in this course literally starts from primary school level and then works it way up to AS Maths (near the end). If you know the basics, you'll find this course almost a joke. I got my 14 year old cousin (who got level 6 in KS3 Maths) to do the final exam (past paper), and he managed to pass with ~50% (I was supervising over him, to prevent him from cheating). That pretty much says it all. I had already passed the course without needing to do the final exam (I had 45% out of 50% before the final exam).

    Q. 11) Could you use University facilities as well as the College facilities?
    A. 11) Yes I could. There are a 'help' lessons, which specifically help you integrate with the University. You basically have access to the University, just like anyone else who is studying at the University. The staff will constantly mention this, just so you feel like a University student. So don't feel pessimistic if you do end up studying at the college, because you still are a University student. Don't let anybody else tell you otherwise.

    Q. 12) What did you generally think of the lectures?
    A. 12) Most of them are decent. However, I had this one teacher, who was new to the job (teaching biology). She was pretty incompetent. If you want help, make sure to email them. They should reply back to you pretty fast (within 48 hours). Don't expect much from them though, it's not like 6th Form at A-Levels. They don't care too much whether you pass or not. If you don't pay attention, you're losing out, not them.

    Q. 13) What is the best way to revise?
    A. 13) During my time, they used a system called 'Moodle' to keep us updated. The chemistry teacher made sure to keep things up to date. Whereas the other subjects were not very organised. You'll also submit courseworks on 'Moodle'. When I revised one day before an exam, I just read up on the powerpoints posted on Moodle by the lecturers. It was extremely useful to quickly read up on the topics I was unsure about.
    I wouldn't recommend buying any books. Just borrow from the library (either the College or University). If you can't get it, don't bother unless you want to get into Pharmacy.

    Q. 14) Is the foundation course similar to your University course?
    A. 14) Based on personal experience, yes it is. I'm currently doing 'Pharmaceutical Science'. The foundation course definitely has a lot of traits which are similar to my course.
    The difficulty is similar too. If you do well in the foundation year, you'll probably do just as well (if not better) during University (first year). I can only speak for my course though, I'm not sure about the other courses that have more biology.

    Q. 15) What results did you get during the foundation year?
    A. 15) Maths: ~75%. Skills: ~75%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~45%.

    Q. 16) What results did you get during your first year at University (Pharmaceutical Science)?
    A. 16) Molecular Skills: ~80%. Spectroscopy: ~80%. Chemistry: ~60%. Biology: ~60%.

    Q. 17) Overall experience?
    A. 17) If you're a mature student and/or somebody who has been out of education for quite some time (3+ years), this course will definitely help you refresh and it's worth doing it.
    I wasn't a mature student though. I came directly after not getting the required A-Level grades. I must say, this course is a much easier route into University than A-Levels.
    I'd say the foundation year difficulty wise, is the same as doing Science and Math at GCSE (while achieving B in GCSE at minimum).
    You can fail the final exams, yet still pass due to good coursework marks, which makes this course an extremely easy route to get into University. Honestly, I don't think a single student who manages to attend 90%+ lectures should fail any modules.
    The hardest challenge is attending all the lectures. Commuting took me roughly 2 hours (2 trains and 2 buses).
    As my UCAS points were below 160, there was no way I was going to get into any University to do my desired course. So I'm extremely thankful that this course exists for lazy people like me, who struggle to revise due to procrastination and/or other personal reasons.
    I've applied to live out for my 2nd year (3rd year, if you count foundation year) at University (1st year doesn't count towards your degree grade, 2nd and 3rd year do). Hopefully by living out, I can actually concentrate on revising for the first time in my life. This way, I should easily manage to get a first degree (70%+).

    Q. 18) How do you think the foundation course can be improved?
    A. 18)
    - Lower tuition prices. I honestly don't see why they need that much money.
    - If somebody fails to get into University straight away, allow them to do 'entry' exams, to see if they really need to attend a foundation course or not.
    They can put the study material on their website. They can set a specific date for when the 'entry exams' will take place (probably should be set in late August).
    If something like that existed, I'm pretty sure I would have passed without needing to do the foundation course. However I doubt they'll do that, because they're greedy for money, rather than to judge whether somebody is intellectually competent enough to cope with University or not.
    - Generally, food prices are too expensive. Example: Sandwich prices shouldn't cost more than £1. The local shops at Kingston literally sell it for £1. So why can't the College & University?
    You'd think they'd get better deals than a local shop... Food prices are cheaper at the College though, but not by much.



    TL;DR =
    If you failed AS/A-Levels, this course is probably the easiest route into a Science course at University. The minute you get your AS results and if you didn't get C or above in most subjects, I'd recommend you apply for this course straight away. Don't bother doing A2/completing A levels- you'll probably end up wasting time & it (AS/A2) requires far more effort (plus you'll avoid retakes).
    Heck, even if you have only done GCSE with B's and above (in Science and Maths), you should find this course relatively easy as long as you attend nearly all of the lectures (~95%).
    I didn't even have enough UCAS points to meet this course's minimum requirement, as I only did AS (I got 3 E's). I only revised the night before an exam for all of the foundation module exams, yet I still passed this course easily.

    If you know anybody who has failed A-Levels and failed to get into a Science course via UCAS clearing. Then I'd highly recommend you tell them about this course, which is almost a guaranteed route into a Science course at University.
    I wish more schools told students about foundation courses. They make it seem like you can never get into University if you fail A-Levels.




    Module Guides - Click here to download!

    Revision: Kingston Science Foundation Year - Click here to download!
    (mostly past papers)

    You don't just have to take my word for it, that this course is easy.
    Have a look yourself, by downloading the module guides & revision material.
    I have two lectures I can't attend because of work, if I didn't attend any of them all year would I fail?
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    (Original post by morganeluke)
    I have two lectures I can't attend because of work, if I didn't attend any of them all year would I fail?
    I know some people who had like 50% attendance and still passed the year.

    Just make sure to not miss any in-class exams or practical exams. It's up to you to find out when they are (check the module guide & ask the lecturers beforehand). Also make a few friends that attend all/most lectures, and have them keep you updated. Furthermore make sure to do well in the courseworks.

    As you're missing lectures, you should take it upon yourself to revise the material during your spare time. The lecture powerpoints should be put on 'moodle', so you can keep yourself updated by viewing that.
    You'll definitely need to revise for Biology no matter what you got in A-Levels (there is an exam before the Christmas holidays for that - 20%).
    But for the other modules, if you got at least B in GCSE & D in AS Chemistry & Maths, you should be fine without much revision for them.

    I'm pretty good at cramming in last minute revision, but not everybody can do that well. For many lectures, I could do most of the work without needing help/listening to the lecturers as I did AS Biology, Chemistry, and Maths.
    If I wasn't sure how to work something out, I just asked.
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    (Original post by Alchemist.)
    I know some people who had like 50% attendance and still passed the year.

    Just make sure to not miss any in-class exams or practical exams. It's up to you to find out when they are (check the module guide & ask the lecturers beforehand). Also make a few friends that attend all/most lectures, and have them keep you updated. Furthermore make sure to do well in the courseworks.

    As you're missing lectures, you should take it upon yourself to revise the material during your spare time. The lecture powerpoints should be put on 'moodle', so you can keep yourself updated by viewing that.
    You'll definitely need to revise for Biology no matter what you got in A-Levels (there is an exam before the Christmas holidays for that - 20%).
    But for the other modules, if you got at least D in AS Chemistry & Maths, you should be fine without much revision for them.

    I'm pretty good at cramming in last minute revision, but not everybody can do that well. For many lectures, I could do most of the work without needing help/listening to the lecturers as I did AS Biology, Chemistry, and Maths.
    If I wasn't sure how to work something out, I just asked.
    Thanks so much
 
 
 
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