LLM at UCL or LPC with LLM component at the University of Law?

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Triplen
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Hello,

I got accepted to study an LLM at UCL but had also applied to UoL as a backup in case I didn't get into my LLM. When I asked UoL if I could defer my offer they responded reminding my that the LPC at UoL has a masters package.

I get the impression that an LLM from UCL would be more highly valued than an LLM/LPC combination from UoL. Can anyone let me know if I'm correct or if there's an obvious advantage to one or the other that I'm missing?
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The LLM/LPC from UoL isn't a "proper" LLM at all. It is just the regular LPC with an additional module added on, and it is not an academic course if that is what you are looking for.
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ORW
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(Original post by Forum User)
The LLM/LPC from UoL isn't a "proper" LLM at all. It is just the regular LPC with an additional module added on, and it is not an academic course if that is what you are looking for.
Exactly, and UoL is not a prestigious institution... I am shocked it is allowed to award an LLB. I know people doing it and well, its so much less stringent than a proper LLB yet they try and make out 1sts in their modules on it are amazing when at a proper uni their 1st would be a low 2:1. They also are not respected by law firms. Definitely go with UCL, a proper LLM and an excellent reputation. Dont know why UoL offers an LLM as its rubbish and not proper or respected.
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999tigger
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They serve different purposes. What is it you want to do? If you want academic, then do UCL. If you can afford it.
The LPC serves a specific puprose as the vocational stage of yout prep to be a solicitor.
Decide what it is you want to be doing.

Loving the shock above.
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(Original post by ORW)
I am shocked it is allowed to award an LLB.
That is a pretty absurd position to take, in my opinion. Then again I am a chippy BPP grad, and I assume you are shocked they are allowed to award LLBs too.
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ORW
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(Original post by Forum User)
That is a pretty absurd position to take, in my opinion. Then again I am a chippy BPP grad, and I assume you are shocked they are allowed to award LLBs too.
Yes I am because the entry requirements are very low and the calibre of students is low as I know from people doing the UoL (practically the same as BPP) LLB. City law firms do not really bother looking at them. To my own admission though I am quite elitist in my opinion of where people should do Law (Oxbridge or Russell Group), but to be honest a lot of law firms are too
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999tigger
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Can we have more shock and a bit of outrage please.
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(Original post by ORW)
Yes I am because the entry requirements are very low and the calibre of students is low as I know from people doing the UoL (practically the same as BPP) LLB. City law firms do not really bother looking at them. To my own admission though I am quite elitist in my opinion of where people should do Law (Oxbridge or Russell Group), but to be honest a lot of law firms are too
I think you are taking a legitimate point (UoL is not as reputable as a Russell Group uni) and taking it to ridiculous lengths. There are poor students everywhere (including Oxford, Cambridge, UCL etc). No doubt there are more poor students at UoL, but there will be some good students and some of them will no doubt get training contracts at large commercial law firms.
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ORW
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(Original post by Forum User)
I think you are taking a legitimate point (UoL is not as reputable as a Russell Group uni) and taking it to ridiculous lengths. There are poor students everywhere (including Oxford, Cambridge, UCL etc). No doubt there are more poor students at UoL, but there will be some good students and some of them will no doubt get training contracts at large commercial law firms.
Only a very very small amount would in regards to your second point. UoL requirements are below what city law firms ask for in academic minimums e.g their A level filter. Most who attend will have the unis requirements which does not meet the firm's filters, hence why the big firms do not bother visiting UoL students as well as its lower reputation. It is quite rare someone doing an LLB at BPP or UoL with the necessary grades for a top firm will have chosen there to do their LLB...
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wabi-sabi
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They are quite different courses.

The LPC LLM is a vocational course usually taken by those who want to qualify as a solicitor. The LLM is an academic study of an area of law in more depth. If you have no intention in becoming a solicitor don't bother doing the LPC LLM.
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(Original post by ORW)
Only a very very small amount would in regards to your second point. UoL requirements are below what city law firms ask for in academic minimums e.g their A level filter. Most who attend will have the unis requirements which does not meet the firm's filters, hence why the big firms do not bother visiting UoL students as well as its lower reputation. It is quite rare someone doing an LLB at BPP or UoL with the necessary grades for a top firm will have chosen there to do their LLB...
Hmm, true, I'd forgotten about the A-Level filters as I was never interested in becoming a solicitor.
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(Original post by Triplen)
I get the impression that an LLM from UCL would be more highly valued than an LLM/LPC combination from UoL. Can anyone let me know if I'm correct or if there's an obvious advantage to one or the other that I'm missing?
Going back on-topic, feel free to ask me anything about the LLM at UCL. I've just finished mine (apart from the dissertation, which I am in the middle of writing).
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InvestmentBankin
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One is academic, the other is professional, no common denominator apart from the [misleading] titles.
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username738914
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(Original post by ORW)
Only a very very small amount would in regards to your second point. UoL requirements are below what city law firms ask for in academic minimums e.g their A level filter. Most who attend will have the unis requirements which does not meet the firm's filters, hence why the big firms do not bother visiting UoL students as well as its lower reputation. It is quite rare someone doing an LLB at BPP or UoL with the necessary grades for a top firm will have chosen there to do their LLB...
Not as rare as you'd think actually

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djh93
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hi does anyone has pointers with a UCL LLM application?
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(Original post by djh93)
hi does anyone has pointers with a UCL LLM application?
It's really not that competitive. If you're on course for at least a high 2:1, can get a couple of decent references and give some kind of sensible reason why you want to do it then I would be surprised if you didn't get an offer.
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djh93
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(Original post by Forum User)
It's really not that competitive. If you're on course for at least a high 2:1, can get a couple of decent references and give some kind of sensible reason why you want to do it then I would be surprised if you didn't get an offer.
Thanks, that's reassuring to hear

Except I averaged at 66% at Bristol and am unsure if that's considered a high 2:1. Will I stand a chance at LSE?
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(Original post by djh93)
Thanks, that's reassuring to hear

Except I averaged at 66% at Bristol and am unsure if that's considered a high 2:1. Will I stand a chance at LSE?
Offer at UCL are usually conditional on a 65%+ average so if you have finished with a 66 average from what is a decent university then I expect you'll be fine. No idea about LSE but in general LLMs are not as competitive to get onto as LLBs.
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djh93
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(Original post by Forum User)
Offer at UCL are usually conditional on a 65%+ average so if you have finished with a 66 average from what is a decent university then I expect you'll be fine. No idea about LSE but in general LLMs are not as competitive to get onto as LLBs.
Thank you so much! Will be getting down to my applications!
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han55
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(Original post by Triplen)
Hello,

I got accepted to study an LLM at UCL but had also applied to UoL as a backup in case I didn't get into my LLM. When I asked UoL if I could defer my offer they responded reminding my that the LPC at UoL has a masters package.

I get the impression that an LLM from UCL would be more highly valued than an LLM/LPC combination from UoL. Can anyone let me know if I'm correct or if there's an obvious advantage to one or the other that I'm missing?
If you haven't already secured a training contract, I wouldn't bother with the LPC to be honest. But it depends what you want to do after the LLM.
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